Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > General Discussion > Tech Help, Electronics, & Gaming
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Tech Help, Electronics, & Gaming Discuss M$ Updates came out today at the General Discussion; Originally Posted by Lollie Thank God 10 is the last version of Windows. I believe Microsoft said there would never ...

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 05-15-2017, 01:19 PM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 35,095
Thanks: 17,386
Thanked 9,957 Times in 7,759 Posts
Default Re: M$ Updates came out today

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lollie View Post
Thank God 10 is the last version of Windows.
I believe Microsoft said there would never be an 11.


I guess M$ has realized the plain truth by now. It can't build a perfect P.C. and if they try harder all will crash...
__________________
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”
―Thomas Jefferson


Improvise-Adapt-Over Come.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to mlurp For This Useful Post:
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 05-16-2017, 05:50 AM
Empathist
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: London, England
Gender: Female
Posts: 10,441
Thanks: 6,763
Thanked 5,525 Times in 3,902 Posts
Default Re: M$ Updates came out today

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlurp View Post
What I am saying is I had no such option M$ made me take the upgrade by downloading it automatically and then applying it when I turned on my PC the next day.

There were no "I don't want this choices period!"
I got round that by accepting and then there was an option saying something like are you sure you want to accept and then I clicked no. I did that every single time, and it worked!
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 05-16-2017, 07:56 AM
Senior's Avatar
Political Independent 👌
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,552
Thanks: 971
Thanked 926 Times in 641 Posts
Default Re: M$ Updates came out today

Windows 10 is not vulnerable to the Wanna Crypt/Cry ransomware virus.

If you have an older legacy version of Windows (Windows Server 2003, XP, Windows 8), you can download the MS security patch for your version of Windows via links at the bottom of the page below...

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks
__________________
*
Semper Gumby / USMC - Always Be Flexible
*
When the ramp drops, the bullshıt stops
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Senior For This Useful Post:
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 05-16-2017, 10:57 PM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 35,095
Thanks: 17,386
Thanked 9,957 Times in 7,759 Posts
Default Re: M$ Updates came out today

Quote:
Originally Posted by Senior View Post
Windows 10 is not vulnerable to the Wanna Crypt/Cry ransomware virus.

If you have an older legacy version of Windows (Windows Server 2003, XP, Windows 8), you can download the MS security patch for your version of Windows via links at the bottom of the page below...

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks
One would think M$ would have made this plain as daylight in every news broadcast related to this hack.

But no we have to search for it.
__________________
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”
―Thomas Jefferson


Improvise-Adapt-Over Come.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 05-17-2017, 06:52 AM
Counselor
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 896
Thanks: 733
Thanked 237 Times in 198 Posts
Question Re: M$ Updates came out today

No. Korea suspected in Wannacry cyber attack...

Did North Korea cook up the sinister ransomeware cyber plot that infected over 150 countries?
Wednesday 17th May, 2017 - In a bid to catch the extortionists behind the global cyberattack that affected more than 150 countries, investigators are now searching for digital clues.
Quote:
Cybersecurity experts now reveal that circumstantial evidence indicates that North Korea may be behind the global “ransomware” attack - citing the modus operandi from previous similar cyberattacks attributed to North Korea According to Simon Choi, who advises the South Korean government and has been analyzing North Korean malware since 2008 - North Korea is no newcomer to the world of bitcoins. Choi, who is also a director at South Korean anti-virus software company Hauri Inc. has said that North Korea has been mining the digital currency using malicious computer programs since as early as 2013.

In the ransomware attack that has gripped the world since the weekend, hackers demand payment from victims in bitcoins to regain access to their encrypted computers. The malware struck hospitals, factories, government agencies, banks and other businesses - taking all the data hostage since Friday. However, as opposed to expert predictions - the second-wave outbreak largely failed to materialize after the weekend. Like Choi, a number of researchers around the world have suggested a possible link between the “ransomware” known as WannaCry and hackers linked to North Korea. According to researchers at Symantec and Kaspersky Lab - similarities between WannaCry and previous attacks blamed on North Korea have been found.


However, so far there has been no conclusive evidence of the links. Authorities meanwhile continue to investigate the ransomware and are focussed on the digital clues and following the money. Choi said, “We are talking about a possibility, not that this was done by North Korea.” Experts meanwhile have also said that the rapid spread of the worm globally suggests it did not rely on phishing, a method whereby an email is sent to people with the aim of having them click on infected documents or links. Analysts at the European Union cybersecurity agency have said that the hackers likely scanned the internet for systems that were vulnerable to infection and exploited those computers remotely.

They explained that the worm is likely to have spread through a channel that links computers running Microsoft Windows in a network. A similar method has been found in previously known North Korean cyberattacks, including the 2014 Sony hack that was blamed on North Korea. Choi said, “Since a July 2009 cyberattack by North Korea, they used the same method. It’s not unique in North Korea but it’s also not a very common method.” He has cited an accidental communication he had last year with a hacker traced to a North Korean internet address who admitted development of ransomware. According to Kaspersky Lab, portions of the WannaCry program use the same code as malware previously distributed by the Lazarus Group, a hacker collective that was said to be behind the 2014 Sony hack.

MORE
__________________
The water's always turbulent where two great rivers meet.
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 05-18-2017, 07:18 AM
Counselor
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 896
Thanks: 733
Thanked 237 Times in 198 Posts
Angry Re: M$ Updates came out today

Another large-scale cyberattack underway...

Another large-scale cyberattack underway: experts
May 17, 2017 • Another large-scale, stealthy cyberattack is underway on a scale that could dwarf last week's assault on computers worldwide, a global cybersecurity firm told AFP on Wednesday.
Quote:
The new attack targets the same vulnerabilities the WannaCry ransomware worm exploited but, rather than freeze files, uses the hundreds of thousands of computers believed to have been infected to mine virtual currency. Following the detection of the WannaCry attack on Friday, researchers at Proofpoint discovered a new attack linked to WannaCry called Adylkuzz, said Nicolas Godier, a researcher at the computer security firm. "It uses the hacking tools recently disclosed by the NSA and which have since been fixed by Microsoft in a more stealthy manner and for a different purpose," he said.

Instead of completely disabling an infected computer by encrypting data and seeking a ransom payment, Adylkuzz uses the machines it infects to "mine" in a background task a virtual currency, Monero, and transfer the money created to the authors of the virus. Virtual currencies such as Monero and Bitcoin use the computers of volunteers to record transactions. They are said to "mine" for the currency and are occasionally rewarded with a piece of it.


A global cybersecurity firm has warned that another large-scale, stealthy cyberattack is underway on a scale that could dwarf last week's assault on computers worldwide.

Proofpoint said in a blog that symptoms of the attack include loss of access to shared Windows resources and degradation of PC and server performance, effects which some users may not notice immediately. "As it is silent and doesn't trouble the user, the Adylkuzz attack is much more profitable for the cyber criminals. It transforms the infected users into unwitting financial supporters of their attackers," said Godier. Proofpoint said it has detected infected machines that have transferred several thousand dollars worth of Monero to the creators of the virus.

The firm believes Adylkuzz has been on the loose since at least May 2, and perhaps even since April 24, but due to its stealthy nature was not immediately detected. "We don't know how big it is" but "it's much bigger than WannaCry", Proofpoint's vice president for email products, Robert Holmes, told AFP. A US official on Tuesday put the number of computers infected by WannaCry at over 300,000. "We have seen that before -- malwares mining cryptocurrency -- but not this scale," said Holmes. The WannaCry attack has sparked havoc in computer systems worldwide.

MORE
__________________
The water's always turbulent where two great rivers meet.
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2017, 10:51 PM
Counselor
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 896
Thanks: 733
Thanked 237 Times in 198 Posts
Angry Re: M$ Updates came out today

Wannacry could continue to be a problem in the future...

Ransomware Attack Could Herald Future Problems
May 13, 2017 — Tech staffs around the world worked around the clock this weekend to protect computers and patch networks to block the computer hack whose name sounds like a pop song — "WannaCry" — as analysts warned the global ransomware attack could be just the first of a new wave of strikes by computer criminals.
Quote:
The United States suffered relatively few effects from the ransomware that appeared on tens of thousands of computer systems across Europe and into Asia, beginning Friday. Security experts remained cautious, however, and stressed there was a continuing threat. In contrast to reports from several European security firms, a researcher at the Tripwire company on the U.S. West Coast said late Saturday that the attack could be diminishing. "It looks like it's tailing off," said Travis Smith of Tripwire. "I hope that's the case," Smith added. The Oregon firm protects large enterprises and governments from computer security threats.

Ransomware attack

The code for the ransomware unleashed Friday remains freely available on the internet, experts said, so those behind the WannaCry attack — also known as WanaCryptor 2.0 and a variety of other names — could launch new strikes in coming days or weeks. Copycat attacks by other high-tech criminals also are possible. "We are not out of the woods yet," said Gary Davis, chief consumer security evangelist at McAfee, the global computer security software company in Santa Clara, California. "We think it's going to be the footprint for other kinds of attacks in the future." The attack hit scores of countries — more than 100, by some experts' count — and infected tens of thousands of computer networks.


A security specialist works at a computer station with a cyberthreat map displayed on a wall in front of him in the Cyber Security Operations Center at AEP headquarters in Columbus, Ohio

Industry reports indicate Russia, Taiwan, Ukraine and Britain were among the countries hit hardest, and more hacking reports can be expected when offices reopen for the new workweek Monday or, in some parts of the world, Sunday. One of the weapons used in the current attack is a software tool reportedly stolen from the U.S. National Security Agency and published on the internet by hackers last month. The tool affords hackers undetected entry into many Microsoft computer operating systems, which is what they need to plant their ransomware. However, Microsoft issued patches to fix that vulnerability in its software weeks ago that could greatly reduce the chances of intrusion.

Outdated operating systems

The crippling effects of WannaCry highlight a problem that experts have long known about, and one that appears to have hit developing countries harder. Some organizations are more vulnerable to intrusion because they use older or outdated operating systems, usually due to the cost of upgrading software or buying modern hardware needed to install better-protected operating systems. Companies like Microsoft eventually stop updating or supporting older versions of their software, so customers using those programs do not receive software patches or security upgrades. Much of the ransomware's spread around the world occurred without any human involvement. The WannaCry malware self-propagates, copying itself to all computers on a network automatically.

MORE
See also:

Clues Found to Ransomware Worm's Lingering Risks
May 18, 2017 — Two-thirds of those caught up in the past week's global ransomware attack were running Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system without the latest security updates, a survey for Reuters by security ratings firm BitSight found.
Quote:
Researchers are struggling to try to find early traces of WannaCry, which remains an active threat in hardest-hit China and Russia, believing that identifying "patient zero" could help catch its criminal authors. They are having more luck dissecting flaws that limited its spread.

Security experts warn that while computers at more than 300,000 internet addresses were hit by the ransomware strain, further attacks that fix weaknesses in WannaCry will follow that hit larger numbers of users, with more devastating consequences. "Some organizations just aren't aware of the risks; some don't want to risk interrupting important business processes; sometimes they are short-staffed," said Ziv Mador, vice president of security research at Israel's SpiderLabs Trustwave. "There are plenty of reasons people wait to patch and none of them are good," said Mador, a former long-time security researcher for Microsoft.

WannaCry's worm-like capacity to infect other computers on the same network with no human intervention appear tailored to Windows 7, said Paul Pratley, head of investigations & incident response at UK consulting firm MWR InfoSecurity. Data from BitSight covering 160,000 internet-connected computers hit by WannaCry, shows that Windows 7 accounts for 67 percent of infections, although it represents less than half of the global distribution of Windows PC users. Computers running older versions, such as Windows XP used in Britain's NHS health system, while individually vulnerable to attack, appear incapable of spreading infections and played a far smaller role in the global attack than initially reported.

In laboratory testing, researchers at MWR and Kyptos say they have found Windows XP crashes before the virus can spread. Windows 10, the latest version of Microsoft's flagship operating system franchise, accounts for another 15 percent, while older versions of Windows including 8.1, 8, XP and Vista, account for the remainder, BitSight estimated.

Computer basics
Related:

Hackers Mint Cryptocurrency with Technique in Global 'Ransomware' Attack
May 16, 2017 — A computer virus that exploits the same vulnerability as the global "ransomware" attack has latched on to more than 200,000 computers and begun manufacturing digital currency, experts said Tuesday.
Quote:
The development adds to the dangers exposed by the WannaCry ransomware and provides another piece of evidence that a North Korea-linked hacking group may be behind the attacks. WannaCry, developed in part with hacking techniques that were either stolen or leaked from the U.S. National Security Agency, has infected more than 300,000 computers since Friday, locking up their data and demanding a ransom payment to release it.

Researchers at security firm Proofpoint said the related attack, which installs a currency "miner" that generates digital cash, began infecting machines in late April or early May but had not been previously discovered because it allows computers to operate while creating the digital cash in the background. Proofpoint executive Ryan Kalember said the authors may have earned more than $1 million, far more than has been generated by the WannaCry attack. Like WannaCry, the program attacks via a flaw in Microsoft Corp's Windows software. That hole has been patched in newer versions of Windows, though not all companies and individuals have installed the patches.

Suspected links to North Korea

Digital currencies based on a technology known as blockchain operate by enabling the creation of new currency in exchange for solving complex math problems. Digital "miners" run specially configured computers to solve the problems and generate currency, whose value fluctuates according to market demand. Bitcoin is by far the largest such currency, but the new mining program is not aimed at Bitcoin. Rather it targeted a newer digital currency, called Monero, that experts say has been pursued recently by North Korean-linked hackers. North Korea has attracted attention in the WannaCry case for a number of reasons, including the fact that early versions of the WannaCry code used some programming lines that had previously been spotted in attacks by Lazarus Group, a hacking group associated with North Korea. Security researchers and U.S. intelligence officials have cautioned that such evidence is not conclusive, and the investigation is in its early stages.

In early April, security firm Kaspersky Lab said that a wing of Lazarus devoted to financial gain had installed software to mine Moreno on a server in Europe. A new campaign to mine the same currency, using the same Windows weakness as WannaCry, could be coincidence, or it could suggest that North Korea was responsible for both the ransomware and the currency mining. Kalember said he believes the similarities in the European case, WannaCry and the miner were "more than coincidence." "It's a really strong overlap," he said. "It's not like you see Moreno miners all over the world." The North Korean mission to the United Nations could not be reached for comment, while the FBI declined to comment.

Hackers Mint Cryptocurrency with Technique in Global 'Ransomware' Attack
__________________
The water's always turbulent where two great rivers meet.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
came, out, today, updates

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0