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Religion & Philosophy Discuss Feelings about Muslims at the General Discussion; Originally Posted by MrLiberty Well, I have got to put two cents in here.......... I'm watching the football game tonight! ...

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Old 09-26-2010, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by MrLiberty View Post
Well, I have got to put two cents in here..........

I'm watching the football game tonight!
I'm eating Pizza and drinking wine.
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Old 09-27-2010, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Freshwater View Post
I'm eating Pizza and drinking wine.
Wine and Pizza? Beer and/or grape juice are the only beverages to be served with pizza.

On second thought, grape juice is just like a non-alcoholic wine, so you might be on to something.......
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Last edited by MrLiberty; 09-27-2010 at 07:30 AM.. Reason: 09/2010
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Old 09-27-2010, 11:18 AM
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Default Re: Feelings about Muslims

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Originally Posted by MrLiberty View Post
Wine and Pizza? Beer and/or grape juice are the only beverages to be served with pizza.

On second thought, grape juice is just like a non-alcoholic wine, so you might be on to something.......
It wasn't just ordinary pizza, but gourmet, homemade pizza.
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Old 09-07-2017, 08:29 PM
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UPDATE:

Rohingya village burned to the ground...

Rohingya say village lost to spiraling conflict
Fri, Sep 08, 2017 - The villagers said the soldiers came first, firing indiscriminately. Then came civilians, accompanying the soldiers, to loot and burn. Now in Bangladesh, 20 Muslims and Hindus gave interviews in which they recounted how they were forced out of their village of Kha Maung Seik in Myanmar’s Rakhine State on Aug. 25. “The military brought some Rakhine Buddhists with them and torched the village,” said Kadil Hussein, 55. “All the Muslims in our village, about 10,000, fled. Some were killed by gunshots, the rest came here. There’s not a single person left,” he said.
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Hussein is staying with hundreds of other new arrivals at the Kutapalong refugee settlement, already home to thousands of Rohingya who fled earlier. Nearly 150,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when insurgents of the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army launched attacks on security forces in Rakhine. Reuters interviewed villagers from Kha Maung Seik and neighboring hamlets, who described killings and the burning of homes in the military response to the insurgent attacks. Reuters has been unable to verify their accounts. Access to the area has been restricted since October last year, when the same insurgent group attacked police posts, killing nine.

Myanmar says its forces are in a fight against “terrorists.” State media has accused Rohingya militants of burning villages and killing civilians of all religions. Myanmar does recognize the 1.1 million Rohingya as citizens, labeling them illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. The refugees from Kha Maung Seik and from numerous other villages across the north of Rakhine say Myanmar forces and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists are intent on forcing them out. One refugee, Body Alom, 28, said he hid in forest with thousands of others when the soldiers arrived. He waited for hours before emerging to look for his family. He says he saw corpses in paddy fields and eventually found his mother and brother dead with gunshot wounds. Two other villagers said they saw bodies in the fields. “It wasn’t safe, so I just left them,” he said. “I had no chance to give them a burial.”


Houses are on fire in Gawdu Zara village, Rakhine, Myanmar, yesterday. Reporters saw new fires burning yesterday in the Burmese village that had been abandoned by Rohingya Muslims, and where pages from the Koran were seen ripped and left on the ground.

A military official denied that Buddhist civilians were working with authorities and instead accused Muslims of attacking other communities. “The military arrived at the village later, but did not find any bodies,” said the military source, who declined to be identified because he is not authorized to speak to media. Another military source in the state capital, Sittwe, said Kha Maung Seik was in the conflict zone and clear information about what happened had yet to emerge. The main village of Kha Maung Seik was home to a mixed community, with Rohingya Muslims in the majority along with about 6,000 Rakhine Buddhists, Hindus and others. The village is known to the Rohingya as Foira Bazar for its market of about 1,000 shops where everyone did business.

However, relations have been strained for some time. A government plan to grant Hindus citizenship, violence in the state in 2012 and October last year, and an identity card scheme that the Rohingya rejected as it implied they were foreign, all contributed to tension, the refugees said. Since October, more soldiers were posted near the village, with border police. Patrols went house-to-house arresting anyone suspected of having militant links, they said.

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Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi blames fake news amid crisis
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi condemned international coverage of the migrant crisis in the country's Rakhine state, likening reports of atrocities to fake news or "misinformation."
Quote:
Suu Kyi, the recipient of a Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, reportedly told Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan a "huge iceberg of misinformation" is obscuring the truth about what is taking place among Myanmar's Muslim minority, according to the BBC. The statement from Suu Kyi's office comes as more people, including human rights activists, are calling on the de facto leader of Myanmar to return her Nobel prize. The latest round of violence began Aug. 25, when armed Rohingya militants attacked state police posts, resulting in a military retaliation.

Armed Buddhist civilians and security forces then burned entire Rohingya villages and fired on residents, forcing many Muslim families to flee to safety, across the border to Bangladesh. State officials, including Myanmar's border security minister, said the destruction of villages was part of the militants' strategy.


Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi has slammed international news coverage of the violence in the country's Rakhine state as "misinformation."

Suu Kyi has so far admitted to problems in Rakhine state, but dismissed reports of ethnic cleansing, according to the BBC. She has also said there are fake news photographs of violence that are being passed around with the "aim of promoting the interest of the terrorists." Critics say the government is partly to blame, because reporters are being banned from accessing conflict zones. "If they allowed the U.N. or human rights bodies to go to the place to find out what is happening then this misinformation is not going to take place," said BBC Burmese Service's Tin Htar Swe.

Suu Kyi's office has previously described an account of sexual assault, provided by a Rohingya woman, as "fake rape" on a government-run Facebook page, according to The Guardian. The United Nations has described the Rohingya as the world's most persecuted minority.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-N...&utm_medium=17

Last edited by waltky; 09-07-2017 at 08:42 PM..
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:19 AM
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Angry Re: Feelings about Muslims

Guterres tells Myanmar to end nightmare...

Rohingya: UN chief tells Myanmar to end nightmare
Friday 29th September, 2017 - At least 15 people drowned and scores are feared missing after a boat carrying Rohingya families capsized off Bangladesh on Thursday, as UN chief Antonio Guterres exhorted Myanmar's leaders to end the refugees' "nightmare".
Quote:
The growing Rohingya refugee crisis prompted the UN Security Council to hold a rare public meeting on Myanmar, with the US slamming the country for trying "to cleanse the country of an ethnic minority" while Beijing and Moscow backed the Myanmar authorities. More than half a million Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh in the last month, after the military in Buddhist-majority Myanmar launched vicious operations against Rohingya rebels.


Witnesses and survivors said the vessel that overturned on Thursday was just meters from the coast in rough waters, after it was lashed by torrential rain and high winds. Local police inspector Moahmmed Kai-Kislu told AFP 15 bodies including at least 10 children and four women had so far washed ashore, and there were fears the number could still rise. "They drowned before our eyes. Minutes later, the waves washed the bodies to the beach," said Mohammad Sohel, a local shopkeeper.

Rare meeting

Seven of the UN's 15-member Security Council voted to hold the body's first public meeting on Myanmar since 2009, though they failed to arrive at a joint resolution. Guterres urged authorities to halt military operations and open humanitarian access to its conflict-wracked western region. "The situation has spiralled into the world's fastest developing refugee emergency, a humanitarian and human rights nightmare," he said, while calling for those displaced from the conflict to be allowed to return home. The UN chief noted that the "systemic violence" could cause unrest to spill into the central part of Myanmar's Rakhine state, threatening 250 000 Muslims with displacement.

A donors' conference would be held on October 9, he said. Some of the strongest criticism came from US envoy Nikki Haley, who said: "We cannot be afraid to call the actions of the Burmese authorities what they appear to be: a brutal, sustained campaign to cleanse the country of an ethnic minority. "And it should shame senior Burmese leaders who have sacrificed so much for an open, democratic Burma," she added, in what appeared to be a rebuke to the country's Nobel Peace Prize-winning leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whose reputation as a human rights champion has been left battered by the crisis. Burma is an alternative name for Myanmar.

Stoking hatred
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Rohingya Muslims can return: Myanmar's Suu Kyi relents
Friday 29th September, 2017 - Following international pressure and a meeting with Foreign Office Minister Mark Field, Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi has declared that Rohingya Muslims can now return to Myanmar.
Quote:
Suu Kyi said that the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims, who fled the violence and persecution in Myanmar will now be allowed to return. According to reports from the region, the country's de facto leader gave her "strong commitment" during a meeting with Field. After an estimated 400,000 fled across the border into Bangladesh in the wake of violence from nationalist militias, the UN titled the treatment of the Rohingya in Myanmar as “ethnic cleansing.” Nationalist militias have been accused of torching dozens of villages in Rakhine State, killing and gang-raping Muslims in their path. Further, Myanmar government has been criticized of stoking ethnic tensions which have seen ultra-nationalist Buddhist mobs surround many Muslim Rohingya villages. Due to the violence, the Rohingya have fled Buddhist-majority Myanmar, with many of them packed into existing camps or huddled in makeshift settlements that have come up along roadsides and in open fields on the border with Bangladesh.

The region has drawn a lot of international criticism, in the wake of the situation, and now Field has questioned, “How many [Rohingya] will feel confident enough with the security implications of what has happened in the country to return?" He added that the treatment of the Rohingya in Myanmar in recent weeks "is an absolute and unacceptable tragedy.” So far, Suu Kyi has drawn widespread international condemnation for her refusal to condemn the actions of Myanmar's security forces. She has instead argued that there has been "an iceberg of misinformation" surrounding the reports from refugees of their villages being burned and of people being slaughtered. Following his meeting with Suu Kyi in Myanmar's capital, Naypyidaw, Field, however, did concede that she was in a difficult position since much power still remains in the hands of Myanmar's military.


Until two years ago, the military ruled the south-east Asian country alone. Suu Kyi currently does not have authority over the military. Field however clarified that Suu Kyi remained the best hope for democracy in Myanmar. He said, “She is in a difficult position. Under the constitution the military remains very powerful. There are only small steps that have taken place in recent years towards democracy. She finds herself treading a fine line between the international criticism, which we have obviously seen in the last six months, but also public opinion in Burma which remains very strong anti-Rohingya. Whatever else happens, she is the best hope for ongoing democracy in Burma. What would be calamitous would be for it to fall back into military dictatorship." Field added, "She is becoming increasingly aware, because I am not the only person who is telling her this, that there is much that needs to be done if the international community is going to have confidence is going to be moving into the right place and the right direction."

Earlier this month, Suu Kyi said in a televised speech that she does not fear “international scrutiny” of her government's handling of the growing Rohingya crisis. Suu Kyi had insisted that most Muslims had not fled the state and that violence had ceased. She also noted that it was “sad” that the world was concentrated on just one of the country's problems. She added that she was "concerned" about the allegations of violence and wanted "to find out what the real problems are. There have been allegations and counter-allegations.” Suu Kyi said, “We have to listen to all of them. We have to make sure those allegations are based on solid evidence before we take action." Adding that she wanted to find out why "this exodus" of Muslims fleeing across the border to Bangladesh is happening.

Rohingya Muslims can return Myanmars Suu Kyi relents
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