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Pets & Animals Discuss Walt's Animal & Pet News at the General Discussion; Elephants bein' poached in Myanmar for their skin... Poachers in Myanmar killing elephants for their skins June 6, 2017 -- ...

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Old 06-07-2017, 10:45 PM
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Elephants bein' poached in Myanmar for their skin...

Poachers in Myanmar killing elephants for their skins
June 6, 2017 -- High demand for elephant skin is threatening the survival of the animals in Myanmar, the World Wildlife Fund says.
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Poachers in the Southeast Asian country have turned to slaughtering the animals for their skin as the ivory trade dwindled under pressure from wildlife conservation advocates. There are about 1,400-2,000 wild elephants in Myanmar, according to Coconuts Yangon. The number of the animals being killed has doubled in recent months. Male, female and baby elephants are being targeted for their skin, which buyers believe bring the wearer good luck when it is worn like jewelry, the report states.


Elephants in Myanmar are being slaughtered at record numbers owing to a "skin trade fad," according to the World Wildlife Fund.

The illegal ivory tusk trade, by contrast, singles out male elephants. "Asian elephants are already facing tremendous challenges across their range," said Nilanga Jayasinghe, the World Wildlife Fund's senior program officer for the animals. "Adding to those is this new trend that we are seeing in Myanmar of herds being indiscriminately poached for their skin. It is extremely alarming."

Christy Williams, country director of WWF Myanmar, said there has been a rapid surge in the "skin trade fad," which has "been driven by growing Asia-based demand, compounded by weak law enforcements and fueled by borderless illegal syndicates operating across Southeast Asia." A lack of resources for training local authorities to guard against poachers was cited as a cause for the outbreak of poaching in the country.

Poachers in Myanmar killing elephants for their skins - UPI.com
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Old 06-10-2017, 12:40 AM
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Elephant woman!...

US War Veteran Now Fighting to Save Africa's Elephants
9 Jun 2017 | A decorated war vet with two decades' experience in military intelligence is using her expertise to fight a different conflict.
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A decorated U.S. war veteran with two decades' experience in military intelligence, Lt. Col. Faye Cuevas spent half her career providing intelligence support to U.S. counter-insurgencies in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Horn of Africa. Now she is using her expertise to fight a different kind of conflict: the war on wildlife poaching. Calling herself "the accidental conservationist," Cuevas, an air force officer and a trained lawyer originally from Le Center, Minnesota, is not your typical wildlife enthusiast. She is determined to use her skills, honed in conflicts all over the world, to help save the planet's remaining wild elephants. "If you start to really untangle how poaching happens — how poachers are armed, how they're connected into larger networks and how those networks can move ivory and horn on a global scale, who protects them? Who provides logistics? — it resembles a war in anything but name," Cuevas said.

In the U.S. Air Force, Cuevas worked on America's controversial drone program, collecting intelligence on individuals and organizations identified as threats. "Getting left of boom" was the term used to predict and prevent the next bomb attack. Cuevas can pinpoint the moment she realized that she wanted to fight poaching. "The first time that I saw an elephant in the wild was in Amboseli National Park here in Kenya two years ago," she said. "It was life-changing." "At the current rate of elephant decline, my 6-year-old daughter won't have an opportunity to see an elephant in the wild before she's old enough to vote," she said. "Which just is unacceptable to me, because if that is the case then we have nothing to blame that on but human apathy and greed." She realized that she could use the "left of boom" concept to help wildlife rangers get "left of kill."


Faye Cuevas of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) explains some of the tactics used, at the headquarters of the Kenya Wildlife Service in Nairobi, Kenya

Enter tenBoma — or "10 homesteads" — which uses technology to pull together diverse sources of information, from rangers to conservation groups. She analyzes the data to "create value in information in ways that it rises to the level of intelligence." Together with the U.S.-based International Fund for Animal Welfare, Cuevas introduced a smartphone-based software app that allows rangers and field investigators to enter and share information immediately, rather than write it up in reports at the end of a day's patrolling. "The Kenya Wildlife Service and other many conservation groups are doing fantastic conservation work," Cuevas said. "However, the reality is that there are other challenges — from a cyber perspective, from a global criminal network perspective — that really necessitate security approaches integrated into conservation strategies." The number of Africa's savannah elephants had dropped to about 350,000 by 2014 because of poaching, according to a recent study.

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Old 06-14-2017, 01:05 AM
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Default Re: Walt's Animal & Pet News

Dang waltky your going to have all these threads taken, Cnredd might as well turn this forum over to you now before you take it over.

And I thought I use to have so many threads to keep updating with new data..

I have to ask you, " do you ever get sleep, time to eat?"

What uppers do you take to handle all of these threads?
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Old 06-21-2017, 02:43 AM
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Here kitty, here kitty, kitty...

Science Says: DNA Shows Early Spread of Cats in Human World
June 19, 2017 — Long before cats became the darlings of Facebook and YouTube, they spread through the ancient human world.
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A DNA study reached back thousands of years to track that conquest and found evidence of two major dispersals from the Middle East, in which people evidently took cats with them. Genetic signatures the felines had on those journeys are still seen in most modern-day breeds. Researchers analyzed DNA from 209 ancient cats as old as 9,000 years from Europe, Africa and Asia, including some ancient Egyptian cat mummies. “They are direct witnesses of the situation in the past,” said Eva-Maria Geigl of the Jacques Monod Institute in Paris. She and colleagues also looked at 28 modern feral cats from Bulgaria and east Africa. It's the latest glimpse into the complicated story of domesticated cats. They are descendants of wild ancestors that learned to live with people and became relatively tame - though some cat owners would say that nowadays, they don't always seem enthusiastic about our company.

The domestication process may have begun around 10,000 years ago when people settled in the Fertile Crescent, the arch-shaped region that includes the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea and land around the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. They stored grain, which drew rodents, which in turn attracted wild cats. Animal remains in trash heaps might have attracted them too. Over time, these wild felines adapted to this man-made environment and got used to hanging around people. Previous study had found a cat buried alongside a human some 9,500 years ago in Cyprus, an island without any native population of felines. That indicates the cat was brought by boat and it had some special relationship to that person, researchers say. Cats were clearly tame by about 3,500 years ago in Egypt, where paintings often placed them beneath chairs. That shows by that time, “the cat makes its way to the household,” said Geigl. But the overall domestication process has been hard for scientists to track, in part because fossils skeletons don't reveal whether a cat was wild or domesticated.


The sarcophagus for Prince Thutmose's cat at an exhibit in Seattle.

It's easier to distinguish dogs, our first domesticated animal, from their wolf ancestors. Dogs evolved from wolves that had begun to associate with people even before farming began, perhaps drawn by the food the humans left behind. The new study tracked the spread of specific cat DNA markers over long distances through time, a sign that people had taken cats with them. Results were released Monday by the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. The study “strengthens and refines previous work,” said Carlos Driscoll of the Wildlife Institute of India. The extensive sampling of cat DNA going back so far in time is unprecedented, he said. Researchers also looked for a genetic variant that produces the blotchy coat pattern typical of modern-day domestic cats, rather than the tiger-like stripes seen in their wild cousins. It showed up more often in samples from after the year 1300 than earlier ones, which fits with other evidence that the tabby cat markings became common by the 1700s and that people started breeding cats for their appearance in the 1800s.

That's late in the domestication of cats, in contrast to horses, which were bred for their appearance early on, Geigl said. Most of the study focused on the ancient dispersals of cats. In the DNA samples analyzed, one genetic signature found first in the Asian portion of Turkey - and perhaps once carried by some Fertile Crescent cats - showed up more than 6,000 years ago in Bulgaria. That indicates cats had been taken there by boat with the first farmers colonizing Europe, Geigl said. It also appeared more than 5,000 years ago in Romania, as well as around 3,000 years ago in Greece. A second genetic signature, first seen in Egypt, had reached Europe between the first and fifth centuries, as shown by a sample from Bulgaria. It was found in a seventh-century sample from a Viking trading port in northern Europe, and an eighth-century sample from Iran. The dispersal of the cats across the Mediterranean was probably encouraged by their usefulness in controlling rodents and other pests on ships, the researchers said.

https://www.voanews.com/a/science-sa...d/3907560.html
See also:

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/science-dna-shows-early-spread-cats-human-world-48133207?yptr=yahoo
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:35 PM
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My daughter found a Rhinoceros Beetle today.
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:06 AM
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zori wrote: My daughter found a Rhinoceros Beetle today.

Granny say put him inna pile o' elephant dung...

... an' hell be happy as a clam.
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Old 08-12-2017, 05:31 PM
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The General Theory of Relative Kitties (a scientific paper)

The recent PBS program on Einstein's General Theory of Relativity was on local PBS when Buddy Kitty was scratchin' at the door, wantin' to be fed.

This got me to thinkin'. Have you ever wondered why, when you shake a box of cat food, it causes your kitty to move to where you put the food?

This can be expressed in the equation: Cf=BKm; where Cf is one side of the equation which represents Cat food, and BKm represents where Buddy Kitty, or any cat, moves to.

For example, if you shake a box of cat food, Buddy Kitty will move toward the sound of the shaking. Or if you pour a bowl of cat food into a container, he or she will move toward the container.

If you then place the container on the porch, the cat will move toward the place on the porch where one places the container.

Or if you walk down the steps and place the bowl on the patio, the cat (in this case, Buddy Kitty) will go to wherever you place the bowl on the patio.

So, not only can grand schemes such as space-time be expressed by simple, yet elegant equations; but also everyday occurances such as feeding the neighborhood stray.

(possum still thinks ya can't trust a cat. Right when ya think they's yer buddy - dey'll smack ya onna nose.)

Mebbe there's an equation for that. But that's for another day.
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Old 10-17-2017, 05:32 AM
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Question Re: Walt's Animal & Pet News

Mebbe a polar bear ate `em?...

Mass die-off of penguin chicks alarms researchers
Tue, Oct 17, 2017 - Almost the entire cohort of chicks from an Adelie penguin colony in the eastern Antarctic was wiped out by starvation last summer in what scientists say is only the second such incident in more than 40 years.
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The mass die-off occurred because unusually large amounts of sea ice forced penguin parents to travel farther in search of food for their young, researchers said on Sunday. By the time they returned, only two out of thousands of chicks had survived. “Not only did the chick starve, but the partner [who stayed behind] also had to endure a long fast,” said Yan Ropert-Coudert, a marine ecologist with the French science agency CNRS.

Ropert-Coudert, who leads the study of seabirds at the Dumont D’Urville Antarctic research station, said the Adelie colony numbers about 18,000 pairs that have been monitored since the 1960s. A similar breeding loss was observed for the first time during a 2013-2014 research expedition.

‘UNUSUAL’

“It is unusual because of the size of the population concerned,” he said in an e-mail to reporters. “Zero breeding success years have been noted before elsewhere, but never for colonies of this size.” Sea ice extent in the polar regions varies each year, but climate change has made the fluctuation more extreme. The environmental group WWF, which supported the research, urged governments meeting in Hobart, Australia, this week to approve a new marine protection area off East Antarctica.

Rod Downie, head of polar programs for the group’s British branch, said the impact of losing thousands of chicks was dramatic for an otherwise hardy species such as Adelie penguins. “It’s more like ‘Tarantino does Happy Feet,’ with dead penguin chicks strewn across a beach in Adelie Land,” he said. Ropert-Coudert said creating a protection zone in the D’Urville Sea-Mertz region, where the colony is located, would not prevent larger-than-usual sea ice, but it might ease the pressure on penguins from tourism and overfishing.

Mass die-off of penguin chicks alarms researchers - Taipei Times
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