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Opinions & Editorials Discuss A war with China at the General Forum; Grant Newsham, of The Epoch Times , notes that a conventional war between the US and China would not be ...

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Old 12-10-2021, 04:09 PM
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Default A war with China

Grant Newsham, of The Epoch Times, notes that a conventional war between the US and China would not be so easily won by the Chinese as many people think:

U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said last week that Chinese air force movements toward Taiwan look like a “rehearsal” for an invasion.” It is good that America’s military leadership is finally realizing that Xi Jinping is serious when he says he will use force, if necessary, to seize Taiwan.

Yet, in recent years whenever the U.S. military has “war-gamed” a fight with China over Taiwan, the Americans reportedly have “failed miserably.”

But there are war games and there are war games.

Depending on how you construct the scenario, things might turn out better for the United States.

You see, if the fight is confined to Taiwan and the surrounding area, the Chinese have a big advantage. They can deploy far more ships than the U.S. Navy can, and the same goes for aircraft. Chinese land-based missile and anti-aircraft batteries will further make things difficult for U.S. forces trying to “get in close” to help Taiwan. One doesn’t envy a U.S. destroyer skipper who has two-dozen supersonic anti-ship missiles coming his way and arriving in 90 seconds.

And the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force’s ballistic missiles, which is able to hit moving targets at sea, will give U.S. aircraft carriers much to worry about. The missiles are nicknamed “carrier killers” for a reason. U.S. bases in Japan and Guam, from which American forces will be deploying to aid Taiwan, will also be getting Chinese missile attention.

This just covers a few of the problems facing U.S. forces and the Americans can, of course, strike some blows of their own.

But if it’s just a fight between the Americans and the Chinese, and it takes place right around Taiwan, then the Americans will have a hard time.

However, expand the battlefield, say, to include the entire globe, and the United States’ prospects improve considerably.

Here’s why:

China does not produce enough food to feed itself, nor does it have enough energy or natural resources to power its economy. That’s why the Chinese buy up Brazilian and Ukrainian farmland, Australian milk companies, and American pork producers. The same goes for Chinese oil concessions in Iran, Iraq, and Venezuela; and mines in Africa and South America.

China not only depends on seamless (and long) supply lines to import commodities and raw materials, but it also depends on the same supply lines to export manufactured products that earn vital foreign exchange—and keep people employed and the economy humming.

If the Americans (and their allies and partners) “expand the battlefield” and cut off China from its overseas “assets,” as one Western expert puts it: “without these commodities arriving in China from around the world, the China we know and the Chinese know will not exist … it will be 1.4 billion persons desperate for food, energy, commodities, natural resources.”

So if the United States musters the fortitude needed to impound or sink Chinese shipping and clamp down on air transport in and out of China, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) will be in dire straits.

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA), despite carrying out the biggest, fastest defense buildup in history—including progress toward a “blue-water” global navy—over the last 20 years, still cannot defend China’s overseas assets. And it will probably be another decade before PLA global power projection capabilities can do so.

Compounding Beijing’s problems, China is also vulnerable to U.S. financial sanctions that exclude China from the U.S. dollar network. And Washington might also prohibit U.S. corporate business dealings with China.

So while Beijing might like its prospects in a straight up (and confined) fight to seize Taiwan, it is extremely vulnerable if the United States and other free nations “decouple” China from its overseas assets—and the convertible currency and inward foreign investment and trade that powers the Chinese economy.


But the picture is not entirely a happy one. Newsham goes on to note that a Star Wars scenario might well favor the Chinese.

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Old 12-10-2021, 08:58 PM
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Default Re: A war with China

It is better to have those Chinese totalitarian war monkeys believe they are invincible.
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Old 12-10-2021, 10:27 PM
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Default Re: A war with China

Quote:
Originally Posted by pjohns View Post
Grant Newsham, of The Epoch Times, notes that a conventional war between the US and China would not be so easily won by the Chinese as many people think:

U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said last week that Chinese air force movements toward Taiwan look like a “rehearsal” for an invasion.” It is good that America’s military leadership is finally realizing that Xi Jinping is serious when he says he will use force, if necessary, to seize Taiwan.

Yet, in recent years whenever the U.S. military has “war-gamed” a fight with China over Taiwan, the Americans reportedly have “failed miserably.”

But there are war games and there are war games.

Depending on how you construct the scenario, things might turn out better for the United States.

You see, if the fight is confined to Taiwan and the surrounding area, the Chinese have a big advantage. They can deploy far more ships than the U.S. Navy can, and the same goes for aircraft. Chinese land-based missile and anti-aircraft batteries will further make things difficult for U.S. forces trying to “get in close” to help Taiwan. One doesn’t envy a U.S. destroyer skipper who has two-dozen supersonic anti-ship missiles coming his way and arriving in 90 seconds.

And the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force’s ballistic missiles, which is able to hit moving targets at sea, will give U.S. aircraft carriers much to worry about. The missiles are nicknamed “carrier killers” for a reason. U.S. bases in Japan and Guam, from which American forces will be deploying to aid Taiwan, will also be getting Chinese missile attention.

This just covers a few of the problems facing U.S. forces and the Americans can, of course, strike some blows of their own.

But if it’s just a fight between the Americans and the Chinese, and it takes place right around Taiwan, then the Americans will have a hard time.

However, expand the battlefield, say, to include the entire globe, and the United States’ prospects improve considerably.

Here’s why:

China does not produce enough food to feed itself, nor does it have enough energy or natural resources to power its economy. That’s why the Chinese buy up Brazilian and Ukrainian farmland, Australian milk companies, and American pork producers. The same goes for Chinese oil concessions in Iran, Iraq, and Venezuela; and mines in Africa and South America.

China not only depends on seamless (and long) supply lines to import commodities and raw materials, but it also depends on the same supply lines to export manufactured products that earn vital foreign exchange—and keep people employed and the economy humming.

If the Americans (and their allies and partners) “expand the battlefield” and cut off China from its overseas “assets,” as one Western expert puts it: “without these commodities arriving in China from around the world, the China we know and the Chinese know will not exist … it will be 1.4 billion persons desperate for food, energy, commodities, natural resources.”

So if the United States musters the fortitude needed to impound or sink Chinese shipping and clamp down on air transport in and out of China, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) will be in dire straits.

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA), despite carrying out the biggest, fastest defense buildup in history—including progress toward a “blue-water” global navy—over the last 20 years, still cannot defend China’s overseas assets. And it will probably be another decade before PLA global power projection capabilities can do so.

Compounding Beijing’s problems, China is also vulnerable to U.S. financial sanctions that exclude China from the U.S. dollar network. And Washington might also prohibit U.S. corporate business dealings with China.

So while Beijing might like its prospects in a straight up (and confined) fight to seize Taiwan, it is extremely vulnerable if the United States and other free nations “decouple” China from its overseas assets—and the convertible currency and inward foreign investment and trade that powers the Chinese economy.


But the picture is not entirely a happy one. Newsham goes on to note that a Star Wars scenario might well favor the Chinese.

Comments?
Good to know.
but i wouldnt take anything for granted
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Old 12-10-2021, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: A war with China

Quote:
You see, if the fight is confined to Taiwan and the surrounding area, the Chinese have a big advantage.
And it would be stupid for the US to fight in that manner...

I would take out their ports so they can't resupply, then take out their industrial centers...Then work their way BACK toward Taiwan...

Chinese troops couldn't U-turn...They'd have no choice but to take Taiwan...

...and that's where US Allies should be...Australia, IUK, Canada could "hold the fort" in and around Taiwan while the US takes out the infrastructure from behind and leaves the Chinese troops isolated....

That's what General cnredd would do...at ease soldiers!...
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Old 12-11-2021, 12:04 AM
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Default Re: A war with China

when i read general cnredd i instantly saw this in my head

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