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Opinions & Editorials Discuss Should all locks have keys? Phones, Castles, Encryption, and You. at the General Forum; You Tube You Tube I think the video discusses it well. People do not seem to grasp that we're talking ...

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Old 04-19-2016, 06:00 PM
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Post Should all locks have keys? Phones, Castles, Encryption, and You.


I think the video discusses it well.
People do not seem to grasp that we're talking about creating a "keyhole" availability that others can and will use.

The iPhone saga itself helps document this.
Apple refused to create one, but others had already found an existing vulnerability.

It's only logical that if you create a vulnerability for the government, others will inevitably find it as well.
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Old 03-10-2017, 02:40 PM
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Cool Re: Should all locks have keys? Phones, Castles, Encryption, and You.

Data-scrambling encryption works, and the industry should use more of it...

What the CIA WikiLeaks Dump Tells Us: Encryption Works
March 10, 2017 — If the tech industry is drawing one lesson from the latest WikiLeaks disclosures, it's that data-scrambling encryption works, and the industry should use more of it.
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Documents purportedly outlining a massive CIA surveillance program suggest that CIA agents must go to great lengths to circumvent encryption they can't break. In many cases, physical presence is required to carry off these targeted attacks. "We are in a world where if the U.S. government wants to get your data, they can't hope to break the encryption,'' said Nicholas Weaver, who teaches networking and security at the University of California, Berkeley. "They have to resort to targeted attacks, and that is costly, risky and the kind of thing you do only on targets you care about. Seeing the CIA have to do stuff like this should reassure civil libertarians that the situation is better now than it was four years ago.''

More encryption

Four years ago is when former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed details of huge and secret U.S. eavesdropping programs. To help thwart spies and snoops, the tech industry began to protectively encrypt email and messaging apps, a process that turns their contents into indecipherable gibberish without the coded "keys'' that can unscramble them.

The NSA revelations shattered earlier assumptions that internet data was nearly impossible to intercept for meaningful surveillance, said Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Washington-based civil-liberties group Center for Democracy & Technology. That was because any given internet message gets split into a multitude of tiny "packets,'' each of which traces its own unpredictable route across the network to its destination.

The realization that spy agencies had figured out that problem spurred efforts to better shield data as it transits the internet. A few services such as Facebook's WhatsApp followed the earlier example of Apple's iMessage and took the extra step of encrypting data in ways even the companies couldn't unscramble, a method called end-to-end encryption.

Challenges for authorities
See also:

Alleged CIA Hacking Techniques Lay Out Online Vulnerability
March 10, 2017 | WASHINGTON — If this week’s WikiLeaks document dump is genuine, it includes a CIA list of the many and varied ways the electronic device in your hand, in your car, and in your home can be used to hack your life.
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It’s simply more proof that, “it’s not a matter of if you’ll get hacked, but when you’ll get hacked.” That may be every security expert’s favorite quote, and unfortunately they say it’s true. The WikiLeaks releases include confidential documents the group says exposes “the entire hacking capacity of the CIA.” The CIA has refused to confirm the authenticity of the documents, which allege the agency has the tools to hack into smartphones and some televisions, allowing it to remotely spy on people through microphones on the devices.

WikiLeaks also claimed the CIA managed to compromise both Apple and Android smartphones, allowing their officers to bypass the encryption on popular services such as Signal, WhatsApp and Telegram. For some of the regular tech users, news of the leaks and the hacking techniques just confirms what they already knew. When we’re wired 24-7, we are vulnerable. “The expectation for privacy has been reduced, I think,” Chris Coletta said, “... in society, with things like WikiLeaks, the Snowden revelations ... I don’t know, maybe I’m cynical and just consider it to be inevitable, but that’s really the direction things are going.”

The internet of things

The problem is becoming even more dangerous as new, wired gadgets find their way into our homes, equipped with microphones and cameras that may always be listening and watching. One of the WikiLeaks documents suggests the microphones in Samsung smart TV’s can be hacked and used to listen in on conversations, even when the TV is turned off. Security experts say it is important to understand that in many cases, the growing number of wired devices in your home may be listening all the time.

“We have sensors in our phones, in our televisions, in Amazon Echo devices, in our vehicles,” said Clifford Neuman, the director of the Center for Computer Systems Security, at the University of Southern California. “And really almost all of these attacks are things that are modifying the software that has access to those sensors, so that the information is directed to other locations. Security practitioners have known that this is a problem for a long time.”

Neuman says hackers are using the things that make our tech so convenient against us. “Certain pieces of software and certain pieces of hardware have been criticized because, for example, microphones might be always on,” he said. “But it is the kind of thing that we’re demanding as consumers, and we just need to be more aware that the information that is collected for one purpose can very easily be redirected for others.”

Tools of the espionage trade
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Last edited by waltky; 03-10-2017 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 03-12-2017, 09:23 AM
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Default Re: Should all locks have keys? Phones, Castles, Encryption, and You.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foundit66 View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPBH1eW28mo

I think the video discusses it well.
People do not seem to grasp that we're talking about creating a "keyhole" availability that others can and will use.

The iPhone saga itself helps document this.
Apple refused to create one, but others had already found an existing vulnerability.

It's only logical that if you create a vulnerability for the government, others will inevitably find it as well.
No company should be forced to make their products easy for governments to crack. So hopeful tech companies will use that wiki leaks CIA data dump on how to make their products more secure.
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Old 03-19-2017, 03:44 AM
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Glitches been fixed...

Popular Messaging Apps Vulnerable to Hackers
March 15, 2017 - Those encrypted messaging apps you may have been using to avoid prying eyes had a major flaw that could have allowed access to hackers, according to a cybersecurity firm.
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According to Check Point Software Technologies, both Telegram and WhatsApp, which is owned by Facebook, were vulnerable. The company said it withheld the information until the security holes were patched, saying “hundreds of millions” of users could have been compromised.

The vulnerability involved infecting digital images with malicious code that would have been activated upon clicking the pic. That, according to Check Point, could have made accounts susceptible to hijacking. "This new vulnerability put hundreds of millions of WhatsApp Web and Telegram Web users at risk of complete account take over," Check Point head of product vulnerability Oded Vanunu said in a news release. "By simply sending an innocent looking photo, an attacker could gain control over the account, access message history, all photos that were ever shared, and send messages on behalf of the user."

Both apps tout so-called end-to-end encryption to ensure privacy, but according to Check Point, that made it hard to spot malicious code. Patching the vulnerability involved blocking the code before the messages were encrypted. WhatsApp claims to have more than one billion users, while Telegram has more than 100 million.

2 Popular Messaging Apps Vulnerable to Hackers
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Old 03-20-2017, 03:46 AM
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Default Re: Should all locks have keys? Phones, Castles, Encryption, and You.

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Originally Posted by waltky View Post
Glitches been fixed...

Popular Messaging Apps Vulnerable to Hackers
March 15, 2017 - Those encrypted messaging apps you may have been using to avoid prying eyes had a major flaw that could have allowed access to hackers, according to a cybersecurity firm.
Well at least Porn Hub wasn't on the list
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Damn shame it couldn't have been a father / son event. IMHO.
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