Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > General Forum > Open Discussion
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Open Discussion Discuss Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back at the General Forum; To better understand the current spike in bigotry and hate in the United States, Yahoo News interviewed historians, sociologists, psychologists ...

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 06:23 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: PNW
Gender: Male
Posts: 70,513
Thanks: 22,404
Thanked 18,921 Times in 13,936 Posts
Default Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

To better understand the current spike in bigotry and hate in the United States, Yahoo News interviewed historians, sociologists, psychologists and experts who study hate groups. And we spoke to four individuals caught up in the white nationalist movement, including a former Ku Klux Klan leader and a young ex-“social justice warrior,” whose stories are told here.

_____

On Oct. 19, former President George W. Bush traveled to New York City to deliver a speech at an event dedicated to “The Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In the World.”

His message was sobering.

Most of the media focused on Bush’s “implicit rebukes” of the man who currently occupies his old office, Donald J. Trump: his barely veiled critiques of “conspiracy theories and outright fabrication”; of “bullying and prejudice in our public life”; of a “discourse degraded by casual cruelty.”

But less attention was paid to what might have been the most significant part of his speech. George W. Bush, the previous Republican president, was appearing on the political stage for one of the few times since leaving the White House nearly nine years ago – to announce that hate, of all things, was back.

“We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism,” Bush lamented. “Bigotry seems emboldened.”

The signs are insistent. The odious memes. The “Heil Trump” salutes. The racist graffiti. A rally to save a Confederate statue — and “unite the right” — that descended into violence, including the death of a young woman counterprotester.

“Recently I was kind of introduced to the concept of activism and rallies,” says Gunther Rice, a 22-year-old New Jersey native who attended that deadly event in Charlottesville but was not implicated in the attack on the woman. “I’m like, ‘Wait, there’s a bunch of white nationalists that go out in public and speak and do all this cool stuff and cool events? Hell yeah.’”

The statistics tell a similar story. The most recent were released by the FBI just this week, the agency’s annual measure of the number of hate crimes reported in the United States the previous year. . The FBI defines a hate crime as “a traditional offense like murder, arson, or vandalism with an added element of bias.” In 2016 there were 6,100 reported instances of people targeted based on their race, religion, sexuality, disability or national origin, an increase of 300 over 2015, and like last year the overwhelming majority of those victims were targeted because of their race or religion. Of the 4,496 targeted because of their race, 50.2 percent were black or African-American. Of the 1,583 targeted because of their religion, 55 percent were Jewish and 25 percent were Muslim. This is the second year in a row that hate crime numbers have increased, reversing the trend of the preceding 20 years.

“I’m not surprised,” said Dr. Jeff McDevitt, an associate dean and director of the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University who has worked with the FBI to train agents to identify hate crimes. The numbers are consistent with those reported in recent months by groups like the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center, he says, as well as by cities and other municipalities. In fact, their numbers for 2017 are looking worse: In America’s six largest cities, more than 525 hate crimes have been committed so far this year, up 22 percent from the same period in 2016. “The reason I’m not surprised is this is just another indication of a coarsening of relations in America in the past year or two, particularly aimed at people of color and certain religious groups.”



Still, hearing a former leader of the free world concede that hate is having a moment? That’s a turning point — an admission that’s impossible to ignore.

Why is this happening? And why now? Haven’t we put hate — the bigotry that Bush denounced as a “blasphemy against the American creed” — behind us?

The answer, sadly, is no. Hatred of outsiders has been a cyclical thing in America, and we seem to be in such a cycle now. Economic and social insecurity fuels bigotry, and new forms of communication — the internet, especially — helps it spread. But psychologists and sociologists over the last few decades have begun to understand the qualities that make a person susceptible to what was once called “xenophobia,” meaning fear of outsiders — a useful term that perhaps deserves to be resurrected in Trump-era America. And understanding how people are recruited into hate is a first step in combating it.

Hate in America began even before there was an America. Among Benjamin Franklin’s many written rants against what he called the “Stupid, Swarthy Germans,” was this: “Why should Pennsylvania, founded by the English, become a Colony of Aliens, who will shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of our Anglifying them, and will never adopt our Language or Customs, any more than they can acquire our Complexion.”

The new nation, he wrote, should be a haven for “the … purely white People in the World”, because so many other places were “black or tawny” [Africa], “chiefly tawny” [Asia], or “swarthy” [most of Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, Russia, and — to the puzzlement of historians for centuries, Sweden.) It is only logical to distrust those who look different, he argued, because “I am partial to the Complexion of my Country, for such Kind of Partiality is natural to Mankind.”

This wariness of “the other” is one of the entwined threads that form the foundational myths of the country — of a melting pot contains within it an assumption that blending in rather than standing out is what is valued; the ideal of pulling oneself up by one’s bootstraps assumes an upper and lower rung of social order with membership rules determined by those already at the top.

And so any graph of America’s emotional temperature over time would show periods of exclusion punctuated by spikes of outright hate.



https://www.yahoo.com/news/hate-amer...100032161.html
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 06:31 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Western Iowa
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,666
Thanks: 7,708
Thanked 4,100 Times in 2,669 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

And it is left wingers who are now committing most hate crimes. Cause Trump won.

Yup I HATE the left and all that goes with it.

From the ACA act to gun control the left is a danger to our country and our way of life.

Just look at who sponsor's the left. The likes of George Soros who wishes our country be gutted and fall under UN control.

The Clinton crime cartel is another example of why I hate the left. add in Eric Holder and Loretta Lynch to the list of left wingers who need jail time.

I say it is time to take them out, all of them.

Regards, Kirk
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 07:37 AM
FrancSevin's Avatar
Runs with scissors
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: St Louis MO
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,839
Thanks: 10,216
Thanked 13,818 Times in 7,541 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Racism and social division was virtually a non issue in the first years of the new millennia. And after 9/11 our nation enjoyed a national identity and cohesiveness that successfully blurred the old separations of our societal groupings. In a word, we were a unified people.

The current hate programs against our social and political norms comes from the progressive left. Progressivism feeds on division and disunity. By it very nature it requires problems to justify expansion of government control. It's still here from it's ignition point of 2009 because it has never left.
__________________
I am going to hang a Batman Costume in my closet. .......... Just to screw with myself when I get alzheimer's.
sola gratia, sola fide, sola scriptura.

I AM NOT A REPUBLICAN, I AM A FREEMAN, THE DEMOCRATS WORST NIGHTMARE
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to FrancSevin For This Useful Post:
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 08:31 AM
Conservative Sage
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 18,641
Thanks: 12,078
Thanked 12,982 Times in 7,597 Posts
Send a message via ICQ to AZRWinger
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Not a word about the rabid hatred espoused by the Left. It's all Trump's doing that an unyielding obstructionist "resistance" endorsed and led by Democrats has been formed to fight him at every turn.

Oh wait, suddenly President Bush reviled by the Left as stupid and a murderer "Bush lied, kids died" is a sage voice against so-called hate created by Trump. Why can't Trump be an affable punching bag for the Left wing slime generator like Bush was?

The audacity of Democrat politicians who declare citizens legally assembling to protest the removal of a statue by government as having no place in our country then creating a situation on the ground described by a BLK protester as "It is like they want us to fight" , declaring Trump responsible for the violence is breathtaking.
__________________
What is a 30 something year old single man with a rock in one hand and a Honduran flag in the other?

An asylum seeker.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AZRWinger For This Useful Post:
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 08:51 AM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,260
Thanks: 11,464
Thanked 9,554 Times in 5,888 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZRWinger View Post
Not a word about the rabid hatred espoused by the Left. It's all Trump's doing that an unyielding obstructionist "resistance" endorsed and led by Democrats has been formed to fight him at every turn.

Oh wait, suddenly President Bush reviled by the Left as stupid and a murderer "Bush lied, kids died" is a sage voice against so-called hate created by Trump. Why can't Trump be an affable punching bag for the Left wing slime generator like Bush was?

The audacity of Democrat politicians who declare citizens legally assembling to protest the removal of a statue by government as having no place in our country then creating a situation on the ground described by a BLK protester as "It is like they want us to fight" , declaring Trump responsible for the violence is breathtaking.
While the people in Charlottesville may have had permits to protest the removal of the statue, they are not known to be a warm and fuzzy group, that is indisputable fact. Personally, I believe the authorities knew what could happen, and did nothing to prevent what occurred.

That said, the inflammation of the liberals, women even more so then men it seems, was rather easy to do considering Trumps brash, crass and egotistical personality.

The liberals go heavy on women's rights, some which I agree with, and some is extensive hyperbole IMO. Make the women feel their reproductive rights are being threatened, and the rest was cake.

I believe that both side have added to the caldron over the last 15 years or so. While it may not have been so obvious as what has been happening recently, it was there, simmering.
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GottaGo For This Useful Post:
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 09:42 AM
FrancSevin's Avatar
Runs with scissors
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: St Louis MO
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,839
Thanks: 10,216
Thanked 13,818 Times in 7,541 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaGo View Post
While the people in Charlottesville may have had permits to protest the removal of the statue, they are not known to be a warm and fuzzy group, that is indisputable fact. Personally, I believe the authorities knew what could happen, and did nothing to prevent what occurred.

That said, the inflammation of the liberals, women even more so then men it seems, was rather easy to do considering Trumps brash, crass and egotistical personality.

The liberals go heavy on women's rights, some which I agree with, and some is extensive hyperbole IMO. Make the women feel their reproductive rights are being threatened, and the rest was cake.

I believe that both side have added to the caldron over the last 15 years or so. While it may not have been so obvious as what has been happening recently, it was there, simmering.
I'm not sure resisting the unreasonable protests violence and property loss is equivalent to "both sides have added" unless you believe the peaceful and litter free assembly of the TEA party groups is equivalent to blocking I-70 in downtown St Louis or burning cars and stores in Ferguson.

One is the peaceful, albeit emotional, attempt to redress the government, a Constitutionally guaranteed right. The other is called disorder, looting and assault. A civil unrest from which the Constitutional Government is supposed to protect lawful citizens and their properties.
__________________
I am going to hang a Batman Costume in my closet. .......... Just to screw with myself when I get alzheimer's.
sola gratia, sola fide, sola scriptura.

I AM NOT A REPUBLICAN, I AM A FREEMAN, THE DEMOCRATS WORST NIGHTMARE
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 10:34 AM
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,584
Thanks: 10,286
Thanked 8,450 Times in 5,013 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaGo View Post
While the people in Charlottesville may have had permits to protest the removal of the statue, they are not known to be a warm and fuzzy group, that is indisputable fact. Personally, I believe the authorities knew what could happen, and did nothing to prevent what occurred.

That said, the inflammation of the liberals, women even more so then men it seems, was rather easy to do considering Trumps brash, crass and egotistical personality.

The liberals go heavy on women's rights, some which I agree with, and some is extensive hyperbole IMO. Make the women feel their reproductive rights are being threatened, and the rest was cake.

I believe that both side have added to the caldron over the last 15 years or so. While it may not have been so obvious as what has been happening recently, it was there, simmering.
In my view the CVille incident was a case of never letting a crisis go to waste.

The bottom line is that had the protesters protesting the protesters not shown up the so called nazi group would have walked around the statue a couple times and then adjourned to the nearest biker bar. The officials knew that and did nothing to stop it. The "control" was designating half the park for one group, the other half for the other group, separating the groups with portable wooden barriers, and designating separate entrances. The person killed was not in an authorized protest site, and few if any LEO were present.

What could possibly go wrong?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jimbo For This Useful Post:
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 10:46 AM
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,584
Thanks: 10,286
Thanked 8,450 Times in 5,013 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeyy View Post
To better understand the current spike in bigotry and hate in the United States, Yahoo News interviewed historians, sociologists, psychologists and experts who study hate groups. And we spoke to four individuals caught up in the white nationalist movement, including a former Ku Klux Klan leader and a young ex-“social justice warrior,” whose stories are told here.

_____

On Oct. 19, former President George W. Bush traveled to New York City to deliver a speech at an event dedicated to “The Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In the World.”

His message was sobering.

Most of the media focused on Bush’s “implicit rebukes” of the man who currently occupies his old office, Donald J. Trump: his barely veiled critiques of “conspiracy theories and outright fabrication”; of “bullying and prejudice in our public life”; of a “discourse degraded by casual cruelty.”

But less attention was paid to what might have been the most significant part of his speech. George W. Bush, the previous Republican president, was appearing on the political stage for one of the few times since leaving the White House nearly nine years ago – to announce that hate, of all things, was back.

“We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism,” Bush lamented. “Bigotry seems emboldened.”

The signs are insistent. The odious memes. The “Heil Trump” salutes. The racist graffiti. A rally to save a Confederate statue — and “unite the right” — that descended into violence, including the death of a young woman counterprotester.

“Recently I was kind of introduced to the concept of activism and rallies,” says Gunther Rice, a 22-year-old New Jersey native who attended that deadly event in Charlottesville but was not implicated in the attack on the woman. “I’m like, ‘Wait, there’s a bunch of white nationalists that go out in public and speak and do all this cool stuff and cool events? Hell yeah.’”

The statistics tell a similar story. The most recent were released by the FBI just this week, the agency’s annual measure of the number of hate crimes reported in the United States the previous year. . The FBI defines a hate crime as “a traditional offense like murder, arson, or vandalism with an added element of bias.” In 2016 there were 6,100 reported instances of people targeted based on their race, religion, sexuality, disability or national origin, an increase of 300 over 2015, and like last year the overwhelming majority of those victims were targeted because of their race or religion. Of the 4,496 targeted because of their race, 50.2 percent were black or African-American. Of the 1,583 targeted because of their religion, 55 percent were Jewish and 25 percent were Muslim. This is the second year in a row that hate crime numbers have increased, reversing the trend of the preceding 20 years.

“I’m not surprised,” said Dr. Jeff McDevitt, an associate dean and director of the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University who has worked with the FBI to train agents to identify hate crimes. The numbers are consistent with those reported in recent months by groups like the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center, he says, as well as by cities and other municipalities. In fact, their numbers for 2017 are looking worse: In America’s six largest cities, more than 525 hate crimes have been committed so far this year, up 22 percent from the same period in 2016. “The reason I’m not surprised is this is just another indication of a coarsening of relations in America in the past year or two, particularly aimed at people of color and certain religious groups.”



Still, hearing a former leader of the free world concede that hate is having a moment? That’s a turning point — an admission that’s impossible to ignore.

Why is this happening? And why now? Haven’t we put hate — the bigotry that Bush denounced as a “blasphemy against the American creed” — behind us?

The answer, sadly, is no. Hatred of outsiders has been a cyclical thing in America, and we seem to be in such a cycle now. Economic and social insecurity fuels bigotry, and new forms of communication — the internet, especially — helps it spread. But psychologists and sociologists over the last few decades have begun to understand the qualities that make a person susceptible to what was once called “xenophobia,” meaning fear of outsiders — a useful term that perhaps deserves to be resurrected in Trump-era America. And understanding how people are recruited into hate is a first step in combating it.

Hate in America began even before there was an America. Among Benjamin Franklin’s many written rants against what he called the “Stupid, Swarthy Germans,” was this: “Why should Pennsylvania, founded by the English, become a Colony of Aliens, who will shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of our Anglifying them, and will never adopt our Language or Customs, any more than they can acquire our Complexion.”

The new nation, he wrote, should be a haven for “the … purely white People in the World”, because so many other places were “black or tawny” [Africa], “chiefly tawny” [Asia], or “swarthy” [most of Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, Russia, and — to the puzzlement of historians for centuries, Sweden.) It is only logical to distrust those who look different, he argued, because “I am partial to the Complexion of my Country, for such Kind of Partiality is natural to Mankind.”

This wariness of “the other” is one of the entwined threads that form the foundational myths of the country — of a melting pot contains within it an assumption that blending in rather than standing out is what is valued; the ideal of pulling oneself up by one’s bootstraps assumes an upper and lower rung of social order with membership rules determined by those already at the top.

And so any graph of America’s emotional temperature over time would show periods of exclusion punctuated by spikes of outright hate.



https://www.yahoo.com/news/hate-amer...100032161.html
Mikeyy, your cute chart with the circles conveniently ignores the era between 1968 and 2017. 8 of those years were the Obama years. The rest were mostly benign by today's standards Those years gave us he vote for the black guy, the I don't know what went on, but I know those cops picked on my friend Skippy, Martin-Zimmerman. The burning of Ferguson, BLM, Baltimore riots where the protesters were told they would get a couple free days of lootin', burn', and shootin', to name a few, and now it's all Trump's fault.

Trump inherited a problem rather than created one.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 10:56 AM
foundit66's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: California
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,620
Thanks: 10,112
Thanked 15,311 Times in 9,282 Posts
Post Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

It is disgusting to see the rush to blame the left while ignoring the dirt on the hands of the people blending into the right.

Let's face some facts, shall we?
Despite the nation’s intense national focus on Islamic terrorism since 9/11, homegrown, right wing extremists have also killed dozens of Americans. The groups include white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups and anti-federalists militias. Since 2001, the number of violent attacks on U.S. soil inspired by far-right ideology has spiked to an average of more than 300 a year, according to a study by the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point.
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/u-...ght-every-year

Quite frankly, too many people will ignore the problems blacks face because they are allowed to. If somebody puts forth a peaceful and silent protest like bending a knee at a football game, suddenly they can't abide the display and they complain about it without even bothering to understand the history of what is being demonstrated against.

We've got a problem in this country where our POTUS calls nazis and KKK members as "very fine people".
But the right wants to shine a spotlight on the left.
__________________
“Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.”
~Abraham Lincoln
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2017, 11:03 AM
Dog Man's Avatar
Down Boy!
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Southern Nevada
Gender: Male
Posts: 13,367
Thanks: 6,932
Thanked 6,793 Times in 4,608 Posts
Default Re: Hate in America: Where it comes from and why it's back

I'll bet there are websites out there, that develop nothing but graphs to make Trump look bad, while ignoring all other pertinent data.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
america, and, back, comes, from, hate, where, why

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0