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Mikeyy 11-18-2014 11:34 PM

Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
This gets to a larger point.

Over the past few years, research has revealed that marijuana can both destroy certain cancer cells and reduce the growth of others. Now, a new study in mice has found that when combined with radiation treatment, cannabis can effectively shrink one of the most aggressive types of brain tumors.

In a paper published Friday in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapies, a team of researchers from St. George's University of London outlined the "dramatic reductions" they observed in high-grade glioma masses, a deadly form of brain cancer, when treated with a combination of radiation and two different marijuana compounds, also known as cannabinoids. In many cases, those tumors shrunk to as low as one-tenth the sizes of those in the control group.

"We've shown that cannabinoids could play a role in treating one of the most aggressive cancers in adults," Dr. Wai Liu, one of the study's lead authors, wrote in an op-ed earlier this week. "The results are promising...it could provide a way of breaking through glioma and saving more lives."

In an email to The Huffington Post, Liu pointed out that while research surrounding marijuana's cancer-fighting properties is nothing new, his team is the first to document its effect on the disease when used alongside radiation. "The results showed that the final effect was superior to the sum of the parts," he said. "Hopefully, these results will support calls for formal trials in humans to test these combinations."

Liu and his colleagues examined mice that had been infected with glioma and subsequently treated with radiation alone or in combination with varying levels of two cannabis compounds: THC, the psychoactive compound associated with the "high" sensation, and CBD, which doesn't produce psychoactive side effects.

They found that the tumors were best treated by low doses of both THC and CBD that, when used in concert, made the tumors more receptive to radiation treatment. "Our data suggests a 'triple threat' approach using all three may be of value," Liu told HuffPost.

The researchers also found that together, the low doses of THC and CBD produced a similar effect to a large dose of either compound, which is noteworthy because it indicates that patients may ultimately experience fewer side effects.

THC and CBD are just two of the dozens of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. While research surrounding the therapeutic effects of these compounds has been limited, a team of scientists from the U.K. last year found that a combination of six different purified cannabinoids can kill the cancerous cells found in individuals with leukemia.

Meanwhile, when used alone as a form of treatment, THC has been shown to reduce the size of other cancerous tumors and stop the spread of HIV, and CBD strains of marijuana have had a profound effect on children and adults who suffer from debilitating seizure disorders.

Despite these findings, marijuana is still classified as a Schedule I drug in the United States, meaning the federal government believes it has no medicinal value. The federally-funded National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) grows a limited supply of marijuana in Mississippi, which is used for federally-approved research. While critics have long accused NIDA of only funding experiments that examine the substance's negative effects, the agency has conducted a handful of studies that look at its potential benefits.

Although 23 states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes, many experts argue that the lack of federally regulated studies of cannabis limits doctors' and scientists' understanding the full medical benefits of the plant, resulting instead in a trial-and-error attitude towards treatment.

"You can find publications from the '70s and '80s that show pure cannabidiol is an anti-convulsant," Catherine Jacobson, the director of research at the Epilepsy Foundation, told HuffPost last month. "And here we are 40 years later and we still don't have any new information about this."

Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds

Topcat 11-18-2014 11:54 PM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
That certainly isn't surprising to me:

Historical Timeline - Medical Marijuana - ProCon.org

And it has been used to treat epilepsy in ancient and modern times:

Charlotte's Web: Medical Marijuana Epilepsy Study Beginning

Hairy Jello 11-19-2014 01:19 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
It's great knowing I'll never get brain cancer. One less thing to worry 'bout.

Jackass master 11-19-2014 07:49 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
Some days it in combo with other drugs is the only thing that gets me through the day. They should do more research into using it to treat ailments.:thumbsup

Oftencold 11-19-2014 08:12 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
radioisotopes are good for fighting cancer too that doesn't mean I want to approve them for recreational use.

Mikeyy 11-19-2014 08:18 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
Maybe you should see what all the hype is about. Can't hurt.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Oftencold (Post 713733)
radioisotopes are good for fighting cancer too that doesn't mean I want to approve them for recreational use.


waltky 10-29-2017 03:39 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
UPDATE:

Uncle Ferd says, "Yeah - it's good fer what ails ya...
:thumbsup
House Lawmakers Urge VA Secretary to Research Medical Marijuana
27 Oct 2017 | WASHINGTON -- The VA has been credited with major medical advancements. Now, a group of lawmakers wants the VA to research marijuana.
Quote:

The Department of Veterans Affairs has been credited with major medical advancements since its research office was created in 1925 -- the cardiac pacemaker, shingles vaccine and the first successful liver transplant topping its list of accomplishments. Now, a group of lawmakers wants VA researchers to turn their attention to marijuana. Lawmakers on the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs -- led by the highest-ranking enlisted soldier to ever serve in Congress -- are calling on the VA to initiate research into the efficacy of medical cannabis. In a letter Thursday to VA Secretary David Shulkin, the lawmakers cited the country's opioid crisis and the growing demand from veterans and major veterans service organizations that want cannabis available as a treatment option for chronic pain and post-traumatic stress disorder. VA research into medical marijuana, the lawmakers wrote, is "integral to the advancement of health care for veterans and the nation." "There's the possibility research can help inform not just veterans' care, but everyone's care," said Griffin Anderson, press secretary for Democrats on the committee.

Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., is the ranking Democrat on the committee and a retired command sergeant major with the Minnesota Army National Guard. He's one of nine Democrats and an Independent who signed the letter Thursday. The others are: Reps. Mark Takano, D-Calif.; Julia Brownley, D-Calif.; Ann Kuster, D-N.H.; Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas; Kathleen Rice, D-NY; J. Luis Correa, D-Calif.; Kilili Sablan, I-Northern Mariana Islands; Elizabeth Esty, D-Conn., and Scott Peters, D-Calif. The letter marks the first instance that the leadership of veterans' affairs committee in the House or Senate has urged a VA secretary to conduct research on medical marijuana, Anderson said. Only recently, medical marijuana was thought of as a "fringe issue" by staff of committee Democrats. The timing of the letter was based on Shulkin's comments regarding medical marijuana in May, followed by months of advocacy from groups such as the American Legion. During a "State of the VA" address at the White House, Shulkin -- who is also a practicing physician -- acknowledged there was some evidence marijuana could be effective as a medical treatment and said he was open to learning more about it. "The secretary expressed interest to look into this. I think he was speaking from a personal standpoint, but it was on a public stage," said Megan Bland, a staff member for committee Democrats. "When you look at that, and take the veterans' suicide rates, the opioid crisis and the complexity of post-traumatic stress disorder, it just makes so much sense that if there's a solution, we should explore it."

https://images04.military.com/media/...1200-ts600.jpg
Medical marijuana clone plants at a medical marijuana dispensary in Oakland, Calif

Since May, the American Legion has strongly advocated for more research into medical marijuana. At its national convention in August, the organization adopted a resolution urging the VA to allow doctors to discuss and recommend medical marijuana in states where it's legal. That's in addition to a resolution that the group passed the previous year asking for marijuana to be removed from the list of Schedule I drugs, which include with heroin, LSD, ecstasy and others designated as having no medical use. The Legion has been supportive of research in Phoenix, Ariz., that is the first federally approved study of marijuana's effects on veterans with PTSD. Louis Celli, a leader within the Legion, said the organization is trying to prove to lawmakers that medical marijuana is a politically safe topic. Celli described the letter that lawmakers sent Thursday as "the beginning of the snowball." He noted it carried weight being led by Walz, whom Celli called a "major player in the veteran community." "The U.S. government has to address this issue... they can't turn a blind eye and pretend it's not coming to critical mass," Celli said. "If veteran research could lead the way for a national, medical shift in the efficacy of cannabis and start that dialogue, that's good for America."

Staff for Democrats on the House committee found no regulatory barriers that would prevent the VA from immediately researching medical marijuana. Bland said the VA already possesses a Schedule I license, which is required by the Drug Enforcement Administration to study marijuana. Lawmakers asked Shulkin to respond to their letter by Nov. 14, with either a commitment to develop research into medical marijuana or a detailed reason for why the VA can't. "Everything we looked at suggests the VA can pursue this tomorrow," Bland said. "And if they can't, we want them to tell us why they can't, with the idea that hopefully we'd be able to help them overcome those barriers in the next year."

https://www.military.com/daily-news/...marijuana.html

saltwn 10-29-2017 04:05 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mikeyy (Post 713680)
This gets to a larger point.

Over the past few years, research has revealed that marijuana can both destroy certain cancer cells and reduce the growth of others. Now, a new study in mice has found that when combined with radiation treatment, cannabis can effectively shrink one of the most aggressive types of brain tumors.

In a paper published Friday in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapies, a team of researchers from St. George's University of London outlined the "dramatic reductions" they observed in high-grade glioma masses, a deadly form of brain cancer, when treated with a combination of radiation and two different marijuana compounds, also known as cannabinoids. In many cases, those tumors shrunk to as low as one-tenth the sizes of those in the control group.

"We've shown that cannabinoids could play a role in treating one of the most aggressive cancers in adults," Dr. Wai Liu, one of the study's lead authors, wrote in an op-ed earlier this week. "The results are promising...it could provide a way of breaking through glioma and saving more lives."

In an email to The Huffington Post, Liu pointed out that while research surrounding marijuana's cancer-fighting properties is nothing new, his team is the first to document its effect on the disease when used alongside radiation. "The results showed that the final effect was superior to the sum of the parts," he said. "Hopefully, these results will support calls for formal trials in humans to test these combinations."

Liu and his colleagues examined mice that had been infected with glioma and subsequently treated with radiation alone or in combination with varying levels of two cannabis compounds: THC, the psychoactive compound associated with the "high" sensation, and CBD, which doesn't produce psychoactive side effects.

They found that the tumors were best treated by low doses of both THC and CBD that, when used in concert, made the tumors more receptive to radiation treatment. "Our data suggests a 'triple threat' approach using all three may be of value," Liu told HuffPost.

The researchers also found that together, the low doses of THC and CBD produced a similar effect to a large dose of either compound, which is noteworthy because it indicates that patients may ultimately experience fewer side effects.

THC and CBD are just two of the dozens of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. While research surrounding the therapeutic effects of these compounds has been limited, a team of scientists from the U.K. last year found that a combination of six different purified cannabinoids can kill the cancerous cells found in individuals with leukemia.

Meanwhile, when used alone as a form of treatment, THC has been shown to reduce the size of other cancerous tumors and stop the spread of HIV, and CBD strains of marijuana have had a profound effect on children and adults who suffer from debilitating seizure disorders.

Despite these findings, marijuana is still classified as a Schedule I drug in the United States, meaning the federal government believes it has no medicinal value. The federally-funded National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) grows a limited supply of marijuana in Mississippi, which is used for federally-approved research. While critics have long accused NIDA of only funding experiments that examine the substance's negative effects, the agency has conducted a handful of studies that look at its potential benefits.

Although 23 states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes, many experts argue that the lack of federally regulated studies of cannabis limits doctors' and scientists' understanding the full medical benefits of the plant, resulting instead in a trial-and-error attitude towards treatment.

"You can find publications from the '70s and '80s that show pure cannabidiol is an anti-convulsant," Catherine Jacobson, the director of research at the Epilepsy Foundation, told HuffPost last month. "And here we are 40 years later and we still don't have any new information about this."

Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds

I hope McCain uses it.

GetAClue 10-30-2017 07:33 AM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by saltwn (Post 914837)
I hope McCain uses it.

Based on his erratic voting behavior, I suspect he has been using it and many other hallucinogens, for years.

Mikeyy 10-30-2017 05:21 PM

Re: Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds
 
The new right thinks you have to be in lock step with the new right or you are on drugs.
Quote:

Originally Posted by GetAClue (Post 914923)
Based on his erratic voting behavior, I suspect he has been using it and many other hallucinogens, for years.



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