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Old 12-01-2016, 02:32 PM
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Default Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

Tell me again how strict those gun laws are in Chicago.

Somethin' funny 'bout a city who says they'll protect illegal aliens when they can't even protect their own citizens.

Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016 - Chicago Tribune

In a year of relentless violence, Chicago has hit another gruesome milestone, exceeding 700 homicides on Wednesday for the first time in nearly two decades, according to official Police Department records.

The 700-mark was hit when a 25-year-old man was fatally shot about 6:20 a.m. at 93rd Street and Cottage Grove Avenue in the Burnside neighborhood, said Frank Giancamilli, a police spokesman. Then at about 8 p.m., a 24-year-old man was shot and killed at 6800 block of South Cornell Avenue in the South Shore neighborhood, he said.

A fatal shooting also took place early Thursday, but an autopsy hasn't confirmed that the death was a homicide.

The year got off to a violent start with 50 homicides in January and rarely let up even after the end of the summer — the peak season for shootings.

The numbers are simply off the charts. The 701 homicides through Wednesday marked a nearly 56 percent jump from the 450 killings a year earlier. With one month still to go, that represents the most homicides since 704 in 1998.

Police Department statistics do not include killings on area expressways, police-involved shootings, other justifiable homicides or death investigations that could later be reclassified as homicides. And police said a fatal shooting happened early Thursday, the first day of December, but an autopsy hasn't confirmed that the death was a homicide.

Nearly 4,050 people have been shot, a 50 percent jump from 2,699 victims a year earlier, according to the department statistics. Shooting incidents rose by comparable figures, to 3,315, up 49 percent from 2,224 a year earlier.

The surge in violence has come at a time of upheaval for the Police Department amid an ongoing investigation by the U.S. Justice Department in the past year's fallout over the video showing the fatal shooting of black teenager Laquan McDonald by an officer.

Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson, who was a surprise appointment in March after the city's top cop was fired over the handling of the McDonald shooting, said his department is doing all it can to combat violence rooted in poverty and hopelessness.

On Tuesday, following a speech to the Union League Club, Johnson called this year's homicide totals "unacceptable," blaming what he called a "a small subsection of citizens" for the violence.

"The police are doing their job," he told reporters. "What we need help in is holding these repeat gun offenders accountable for this gun violence, and until we do that, we're going to continue to see the cycle of violence."

Month after month this year, homicides in Chicago have soared to levels not seen since the 1990s. The 92 homicides in August alone marked the most the city had seen for a single month since July 1993. And in November, homicides totaled 77, the worst for that month since 78 in 1994.

The city's violence continues to far outpace both New York and Los Angeles, whose populations far exceed Chicago. According to official statistics through about Nov. 20, New York and Los Angeles had a combined 565 homicides, far less than Chicago's total. In addition, both cities recorded a combined 2,117 shootings.

Crime experts caution about making year-to-year comparisons of homicides, arguing that long-term trends give a better understanding of how the level of violence in a city has changed over time.

Police officials have blamed much of Chicago's violence on the flow of illegal firearms through dangerous neighborhoods and an intractable gang problem. The gangs, once highly structured and hierarchal, have fractured into small factions. Petty disagreements and personal disputes can quickly turn violent with social media, crime experts have said.

Another factor contributing to the violence could be a drop in morale among Chicago police officers because of heightened scrutiny in the fallout over the McDonald shooting as well as a new law requiring detailed reports be filled out for every street stop because of concerns over racial profiling. In interviews, officers recently told the Chicago Tribune that they had taken a more cautious approach to their work, concerned they could end up in a viral internet video, sued or fired.

So far this year, the bulk of the violence has been concentrated in neighborhoods on the South and West sides that have been plagued by decades of poverty, entrenched segregation, gangs, rampant narcotics sales and other social ills.

Two of the city's historically most violent police districts — Harrison and Englewood — account for close to one-fourth of the homicides and shooting incidents.

Harrison, a West Side district that includes communities such as West Garfield Park and North Lawndale, has recorded the most homicides in the city, with 84 through Nov. 20, an 87 percent increase over the 45 people slain a year earlier, official department statistics show. In the South Side's Englewood District, homicides have skyrocketed to 81, a 179 percent rise from 29 a year earlier. And in the Austin District on the West Side, homicides more than doubled to 54, from 26 a year earlier, the statistics show.

The Rev. Marshall Hatch, pastor of the New Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church in West Garfield Park, said he talks to young people in the community about staying in school and earning a legitimate living. But he knows it's not easy for them.

"It's really a culture of death," he said. "There's a lot of fear and a lot of assumption that they're not going to live long. They're going to get sucked up and killed."
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Old 12-01-2016, 04:08 PM
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Default Re: Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

"It's really a culture of death," he said. "There's a lot of fear and a lot of assumption that they're not going to live long. They're going to get sucked up and killed."

Reverend Hatch is right. It's a culture of dangerous living, anger, and defiance.
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Old 12-01-2016, 04:11 PM
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Default Re: Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

Most of these murders are black-on-black.

You won't hear BLM mention or protest that.
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Old 03-03-2017, 08:33 PM
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Question Re: Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

Shotspotter and other technologies to solve Chicago's gun crime problem?...

Can technology solve Chicago's gun crime problem?
Fri, 03 Mar 2017 - US police have turned to technology to help fight crime, but can the solutions really solve the problem?
Quote:
Chicago has one of the highest murder rates in the US, with 51 homicides in January alone. And President Donald Trump has threatened to "send in the Feds" if the "totally out of control" city cannot halt the "carnage". But, now, Chicago has spent $1m (£800,000) on ShotSpotter, installing hundreds of sensors in high-crime areas across two of its districts. And whenever a gun is fired, police officers are immediately given the exact location via a smartphone app. Nearly 100 US cities are now using ShotSpotter - but, despite its success, some remain unconvinced. Dover, the second largest city in Delaware, for example, has said the $195,000 annual cost could be better spent elsewhere. Quincy in Washington and Charlotte in North Carolina have also decided the technology is not for them.


In Chicago, there were 51 homicides in January 2017

Serious criminals

But ShotSpotter chief executive Ralph Clark said some of the cities that have signed up have seen a 35% year-on-year drop in gunfire. "We are seeing thousands of incidents," he told the BBC. "These are not homicides or woundings, but they are still serious crimes. "These gunshots are not coming from thousands of people messing about, we are finding that it is from a few serious criminals - the authorised shooters in gangs who are using it to intimidate people, protect their turf." "The biggest lever in reducing gun violence is to de-normalise it, and people are now seeing the police respond to these incidents, and they can see that the police are serving and protecting their communities."

[img]http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/6989/production/_94771072_mediaitem94771071.jpg[img]
The police are sent real-time information about the exact location of gunfire

Heat list

Three years ago, Chicago made a $2m investment in a predictive policing algorithm, which calculated potential victims of gun crime based on two variables, including how many times they had been arrested with others who later became gun crime victims. Developed by the Illinois Institute of Technology, the system generates a heat list of people most likely to kill or be killed. But according to a recent report from non-profit organisation The Rand Corporation, the investment has had little effect and simply means those on the watch list are more likely to be arrested. The Chicago Police Department countered that the report did not represent the prediction model as it currently worked and denied the system was deficient.


How ShotSpotter works

Threat level

Fresno Police Department, in California, recently tested software known as Beware - which sifts through address-specific public data and individuals' public postings to Facebook, Instagram and Twitter - to alert first responders on the way to a 911 emergency call. The platform, built by security company Intrado, colour codes people's threat level as green, yellow or red. But one member of the city council told the Washington Post that his threat level was yellow, due to a previous occupant of his address. "Even though it's not me that's the yellow guy, your officers are going to treat whoever comes out of that house in his boxer shorts as the yellow guy," he said. The software proved too controversial, and in April the council decided not to renew its contract.


Chicago also invested in an algorithm that could spot potential victims or perpetrators

Wicked problems

Rob Kitchin, an expert on smart cities from Maynooth University, Ireland, said: "There is this idea that technology can solve the problems of a city. "People are treating cities as if there are technical systems, and you can pull a data lever and it will steer a city. "But cities are much more complex - full of politics, culture, community, and wicked problems. "Cities have to look at the problem and decide what solution is best. "If it is technology, then great, but it could be economic investment or a change in social policy."

Can technology solve Chicago's gun crime problem? - BBC News
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Old 03-03-2017, 08:59 PM
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Default Re: Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

Shouldn't we just hit the reset button in Chicago?

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Old 05-17-2017, 10:21 AM
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Cool Re: Chicago tops 700 homicides — with a month to go in violent 2016

Blacks fleeing Chicago...

The Real Problem with Chicago’s Shrinking Population
May 8, 2017 - Recent Census numbers aren’t as bad as they sound—except for one major factor. Since 1980, Chicago has lost more than a quarter of its black population.
Quote:
Scaremongers have been honking at a fever pitch ever since the U.S. Census Bureau released data in March showing a second year of declining population for the Chicago area. “Depopulation is killing this city, and it’s all self-inflicted,” tweeted Dominic Lynch, a contributor to Chicagoly. Curbed Chicago posted an open thread asking readers to comment on whether they planned to bolt, too. And an op-ed in the Tribune by a guest columnist went so far as to suggest the city should annex inner-ring suburbs to boost its slumping tax base.

Meanwhile, politicians and advocates clamored to assign blame for the decline to pet causes. Governor Bruce Rauner excoriated Democrats, of course: Taxes are too high, schools are too crummy, and politicians serve for too long, he said through a spokesperson. The nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety attributed the drop to violence. Twitter user @jetdog asked: “Is this because President Trump says it’s a horrible place?”

Well, not so fast. “It’s all overplayed,” says Rob Paral, a public policy analyst known as the Chicago Data Guy. “In a major city of 2.7 million people, the decline is really quite small. The sky is not falling.” This much is true: The Chicago metro area lost 19,570 people in 2016, according to Census Bureau estimates—the largest drop of any metro area in the country. And yes, it’s the second straight year of decline. But Paral reminds us that this is out of a whopping 9.5 million residents—a mere 0.2 percent dip. He calls the Chicago area a “huge chessboard” with pieces constantly moving on and off it.

So where the headlines imply a gush, analysts see a trickle. And as for the reasons behind the drop? They’re more complicated than the knee-jerk reactions suggest. “The tax argument is really a canard,” Paral says. “Kansas has slashed taxes, and they are losing population.” And while many armchair quarterbacks rushed to blame the exodus on last year’s surge in murders, it’s too soon for people to have picked up their lives in response to that. Things get interesting—and alarming—when you look at who is leaving. “The white population is not falling, and the Latino and Asian populations are slightly growing,” says Paral. “The big factor that is altering Chicago’s population is the change among blacks.”

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