Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > General Forum > News & Current Events
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

News & Current Events Discuss Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges at the General Forum; More RW racism. What a party. Near the end of oral argument in a high-profile affirmative-action case Wednesday, conservative U.S. ...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2015, 11:11 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: PNW
Gender: Male
Posts: 70,513
Thanks: 22,404
Thanked 18,921 Times in 13,936 Posts
Default Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

More RW racism. What a party.


Near the end of oral argument in a high-profile affirmative-action case Wednesday, conservative U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia suggested that black students benefit from a “slower track” at less prestigious schools and are thus harmed by affirmative action. The comments come during a time of racial turmoil on campuses across the country, from Yale to the University of Missouri.

“There are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas, where they do not do well — as opposed to having them go to a less advanced school, a slower-track school where they do well,” Scalia said from the bench. “One of the briefs pointed out that most of the black scientists in this country don’t come from schools like the University of Texas. They come from lesser schools where they do not feel that they’re being pushed ahead in classes that are too fast for them.”

Scalia went on to say that it could be bad if the “really competent blacks” do not go to these “lesser” schools because they might then not become scientists. “I don’t think it stands to reason for the University of Texas to admit as many blacks as possible,” he concluded.

Scalia appeared to be referencing an amicus brief filed by Gail Heriot of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. In her brief, Heriot points to a study that shows minority students are less likely to major in science or engineering if their test scores and grade point averages put them in the bottom half of the admitting class at their institution. Heriot says that if UT actually wanted to help minorities, it would find black students who were admitted to MIT and convince them that their chances of succeeding at UT, which is less selective, are higher. The brief also points out that one-third of blacks who received a doctorate in science or engineering in 2006 got their degrees from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). These colleges, on average, have lower admissions standards than UT.

Multiple studies have looked at this so-called mismatch theory of affirmative action. Some have shown that minority students benefit from attending elite institutions even when their high school backgrounds are weaker than the average class. In another brief in front of the court, professors argued the mismatch theory has been rebutted.

The point is irrelevant in this case, however, because affirmative action itself is not supposed to be on trial. The plaintiff, Abigail Noel Fisher, a white woman who was denied admission to the class of 2008, has not asked the justices to ban the use of race entirely. And in an earlier decision sending this same case back down to a lower court for further review two years ago, seven of the justices wrote that universities may weigh applicants’ race for the purpose of achieving diversity.

At question in this case is whether UT has shown that it needs to consider race, and if the university is using the most narrowly tailored possible means to achieve its goal. The university admits most of its entering class through a race-blind top 10 percent plan, which automatically admits any Texas high school student who graduates in the top tenth of his or her class. The plan boosts admission of minority students, in part because many Texas high schools are segregated.

But the university has contended that it needs to use race as one of many factors in admitting the 20 percent or so of its entering students who do not get in through the top 10 percent plan. These include out-of-state students and talented applicants who attend highly competitive high schools where they were edged out of the top tenth. Most of the black students admitted in the portion that considers race have higher test scores on average than the black students admitted in the race-neutral top 10 percent plan. This calls into question Scalia’s point that affirmative action hurts black students, since Texas’ consideration of race tends to net students with higher test scores.

Some of the Supreme Court justices on Wednesday seemed to question the utility of considering race in admissions at all, suggesting they may be backing away from their compromise on Fisher two years ago.

“What unique perspective does a minority student bring to a physics class?” Chief Justice John Roberts asked at one point, challenging UT’s contention that one of its goals was to attain classroom diversity. (In 2002, UT found that 90 percent of its classes had only one or zero black students in them.)
https://www.yahoo.com/politics/scali...210637220.html
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2015, 12:39 AM
Hairy Jello's Avatar
Deplorable
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,554
Thanks: 1,966
Thanked 13,206 Times in 8,268 Posts
Default Re: Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeyy View Post
More RW racism.
If it's true it's not racism. There's some truth in Scalia's words.

BTW, you do realize you've lost all credibility with the racism accusations, right? It's what happens when someone accuses everyone of racism anytime they disagree with Obama. Ya cried wolf one too many times. Now, when it comes to racism accusations, your words are as authentic as a Nigerian email.

__________________

Not an accurate representation of a white person.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Hairy Jello For This Useful Post:
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2015, 12:55 AM
cnredd's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Gender: Male
Posts: 55,521
Thanks: 2,275
Thanked 36,022 Times in 20,567 Posts
Default Re: Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

There's nothing racist about it...IN FACT, he's referencing Affirmative Action, which has got to be one of thee...if not thee, most racist things about this country...

I'll rephrase Scalia's words...

"People who get into college because of their skin and NOT their intelligence level will do worse than those who DID get their due to their intelligence level."

That sounds like an incredibly reasonable statement!...

How about this statement?...

"People who get into college because of their parents' money and NOT their intelligence level will do worse than those who DID get their due to their intelligence level."

The same people wanting to rip Scalia's eyes out would agree with that statement 100% (If not 110%)...

__________________
"You get the respect that you give" - cnredd
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cnredd For This Useful Post:
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2015, 01:26 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: PNW
Gender: Male
Posts: 70,513
Thanks: 22,404
Thanked 18,921 Times in 13,936 Posts
Default Re: Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

From what I hear the numbers don't back this up. Do you have the numbers or just a feeling. And is your feelings based on your views of blacks?
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnredd View Post
There's nothing racist about it...IN FACT, he's referencing Affirmative Action, which has got to be one of thee...if not thee, most racist things about this country...

I'll rephrase Scalia's words...

"People who get into college because of their skin and NOT their intelligence level will do worse than those who DID get their due to their intelligence level."

That sounds like an incredibly reasonable statement!...

How about this statement?...

"People who get into college because of their parents' money and NOT their intelligence level will do worse than those who DID get their due to their intelligence level."

The same people wanting to rip Scalia's eyes out would agree with that statement 100% (If not 110%)...

Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2015, 01:35 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Western Iowa
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,666
Thanks: 7,708
Thanked 4,100 Times in 2,669 Posts
Default Re: Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeyy View Post
From what I hear the numbers don't back this up. Do you have the numbers or just a feeling. And is your feelings based on your views of blacks?
Really think he needs numbers when logic is quite enough?

Regards, Kirk
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2015, 01:39 AM
cnredd's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Gender: Male
Posts: 55,521
Thanks: 2,275
Thanked 36,022 Times in 20,567 Posts
Default Re: Scalia argues black students benefit from ‘slower’ colleges

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeyy View Post
From what I hear the numbers don't back this up. Do you have the numbers or just a feeling. And is your feelings based on your views of blacks?
The subject is NOT "blacks"...

The subject is "blacks who only got into college because of their skin and NOT due to their intelligence level."...
__________________
"You get the respect that you give" - cnredd
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to cnredd For This Useful Post:
Reply

Tags
argues, benefit, black, colleges, from, scalia, students, ‘slower’

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0