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Law & Order Discuss If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the country? at the Political Forums; This week's video--the vote in the house on thursday nite friday AM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7mI2oZscp4...

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Old 06-01-2014, 11:45 AM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

This week's video--the vote in the house on thursday nite friday AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7mI2oZscp4
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Old 06-01-2014, 01:50 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Smoking weed with the President of Uruguay.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BwVxmJPies
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:06 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xolo View Post
This week's video--the vote in the house on thursday nite friday AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7mI2oZscp4
Sounds great to me as it is a start...

Quote:
Reflecting growing national acceptance of cannabis, a bipartisan coalition of House members voted early Friday to restrict the Drug Enforcement Administration from using funds to go after medical marijuana operations that are legal under state laws.

An appropriations amendment offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) prohibiting the DEA from spending funds to arrest state-licensed medical marijuana patients and providers passed 219-189. The Senate will likely consider its own appropriations bill for the DEA, and the House amendment would have to survive a joint conference before it could go into effect.

Why the House and then the Senate can't just agree on this is beyond me? Yet if they just get it done that would be nice.


Rohrabacher said on the House floor that the amendment "should be a no-brainer" for conservatives who support states' rights and argued passionately against allowing the federal government to interfere with a doctor-patient relationship."
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Old 06-05-2014, 02:57 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
More cops with prescription pill problems, more jail guards tempting fate. Just another week in drug war police corruption. Let's get to it:

In Bennington, Vermont, a former Bennington County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Wednesday on charges he was selling prescription drugs through a woman with whom he was having an affair. He is charged with three felony counts of narcotic sale, seven misdemeanor counts of narcotic possession, felony counts of extortion, forgery, and a misdemeanor count of neglect of duty by a public officer. He has been fired from his job as a deputy and is now out on bail, but under house arrest.
In Sunset, Louisiana, a Sunset police reserve office was arrested last Wednesday on charges he stole prescription drugs from the department. Reserve Officer Ronald Anthony Duplechain Jr., 39, went down after someone told the police chief evidence was missing and the department's video surveillance system then showed Duplechain entering the department and walking out with an evidence bag that contained pills seized in a traffic stop earlier that day. Duplechain later put the bag back, minus the pills. He is charged with malfeasance in office.
In Grapeland, Texas, a former Grapeland police officer was arrested last Friday on charges he resorted to fraud to obtain prescription drugs. Monty Allen Clark, 37, went down after a local doctor contacted the Department of Public Safety to report that someone had fraudulently obtained drugs through a prescription. Clark was that someone, and he is now charged with second-degree obtaining controlled substances with a fraudulent prescription. Clark tried to fill a prescription for Adderall and forged the doctor's name on the prescription.
In St. Martinville, Louisiana, a St. Martin Parish jail guard was arrested Monday on charges he was smuggling marijuana and other contraband into the St. Martin Parish Correctional Center. Marshall Babineaux, 22, faces one count of malfeasance in office, one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana and two counts of introduction of contraband in a penal institution. At last report, he was jailed at his place of employment.
In San Jose, California, a San Jose police officer was arrested Tuesday after the owner of a storage unit complained of a marijuana odor, police found a large amount of pot inside, and the police officer was identified as the renter of the storage unit. Officer Son Vu, 42, a 20-year veteran of the department, is now charged with felony counts of possession of marijuana with intent to distribute. He was in jail Tuesday evening and has been placed on administrative leave.
In New York City, a Rikers Island jail guard was convicted last Wednesday of smuggling marijuana and other contraband into the jail. Khalif Phillips, 31, was found guilty after a one-week trial. He's set to be sentenced on September 25.
30.500

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZI50UzY6hk
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Old 06-18-2014, 07:05 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Phillip Smith, June 11, 2014, 02:54am, (Issue #838)
Posted in:



A Tennessee police chief gets caught misbehaving, so does a strung out Pennsylvania deputy, and a San Diego husband and wife cop team go down for dealing. Let's get to it:

In Graysville, Tennessee, the Graysville police chief was arrested last Monday on charges he was improperly disposing of seized vehicles and dipping into seized cash. Police Chief Jason Erik Redden is accused of either taking for himself or returning to the original owner three of the vehicles, and is also being held responsible for $4,128 in missing seized cash and fees paid to the department. He is charged with seven counts of misconduct in office, two counts of theft over $1,000, and one count of theft under $500.

In Washington, Pennsylvania, a Washington County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Wednesday after he sold the opiate maintenance drug suboxone to an undercover informant. Deputy Matthew Miller, 29, became former Deputy Miller the same day when the sheriff fired him after his arrest. Miller allegedly told the informant he was strung out on heroin and was selling the pills to get money.

In San Diego, a husband and wife pair of San Diego police officers were arrested last Thursday on multiple drug charges amid an investigation into corruption in the department. Officer Bryce Charpentier is charged with possessing and transporting drugs, possessing a loaded firearm while under the influence, and conspiracy. His wife, Officer Jennifer Charpentier is charged with possessing, transporting, and selling drugs, and conspiracy. They have both been put on administrative leave.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNhvj6g8MWc
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Old 06-19-2014, 02:33 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

I am happy to see this weeks crooked cops list is much smaller than normally posted.

Gives us some hope...
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Old 06-19-2014, 09:23 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
In all the years we've been doing this weekly update, there's only been one week with no corrupt cops stories. This week is pretty quiet, but we've still got a couple. Let's get to it:

In Edwardsburg, Indiana, a former Edwardsburg police officer pleaded no contest last Tuesday to stealing pain pills from a private residence. Jesse Holmes, 23, was on duty when he assisted on a medical call at a home and took the pills. He had been charged with larceny, home invasion, and committing a felony while in possession of a firearm, but ended up copping to only the home invasion count. But that's still good for up to 20 years in state prison.
In Michigan City, Indiana, a jury failed to convict a former prison guard last Friday on charges she smuggled drugs into the prison. The jury hung in the case of Christine Evans, a former Westville Correctional Facility officer who had been arrested on the charges in January 2013. She had been arrested after allegedly carrying more than 80 grams of synthetic cannabinoids while reporting for work and hiding the stash in a trash can. But there was no video or other physical evidence against her, and the jury wasn't convinced. Prosecutors have not decided if they will seek a retrial.

A New Leaf: The End of Cannabis Prohibition | Cato Institute
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Old 06-28-2014, 12:58 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
Last week may have been slow on the police corruption front, but we make up for it this week. A Washington SWAT team member goes bad, an NYPD officer pays for going bad, a former Colorado sheriff also pays a price, an Arkansas cop gets nailed for protecting what he thought were dope loads, and, of course, more jail and prison guards get in trouble. Let's get to it:

In Seattle, a King County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Thursday for stealing and reselling ammunition from his SWAT team, peddling dope, and pimping out his wife. Darrion Keith Holiwell, 49, went down amidst a broader investigation into corruption among King County deputies, and the department says more arrests could follow. Holiwell may have sold as much as $45,000 worth of brass bullet casings he stole from the department, which he allegedly used to buy expensive guns for himself and other SWAT team members. He came under investigation after another deputy told the department he may have been physically abusing his estranged wife, and she told investigators he suggested she work as a prostitute and helped her post online ads. He is also charged with selling testosterone to a civilian, and the department says he was likely selling it to other members of the department. Police also found prescription drugs, steroids, and ecstasy when they searched his home. He's in jail under $150,000 bond and awaiting a court hearing next week.
In Ada, Oklahoma, a Pontotoc County jail guard was arrested last Thursday after he was caught trying to smuggle contraband, including marijuana, tobacco, and rolling papers into the county jail. Guard Devin Adams has pleaded not guilty and is out on $50,000 bond.
In Little Rock, Arkansas, a former Little Rock police officer was convicted last Wednesday of charges related to escorting a van he thought was filled with marijuana. Randall Robinson was found guilty of lying to investigators, but acquitted of other charges, including conspiracy to distribute marijuana and attempting to possess marijuana with the intent to distribute. He went down in an FBI sting. No word yet on his sentencing.
In New York City, an NYPD officer was convicted last Thursday of committing a series of violent drug and money rip-offs with a gang of no-gooders. Jose Tejada, 46, a 17-year veteran of the force, was convicted of armed robbery and drug trafficking for participating in three robberies of drug dealers in the Bronx in 2006 and 2007 in which the robbers scored thousands of dollars in cash and cocaine. Tejada was in uniform for at least one of the robberies and used it to gain access to a home where he thought drug dealers were, but which actually belonging to an innocent family. He's looking at up to life in prison.
In Albany, Georgia, a former Pelham jail guard was sentenced last Wednesday to 15 months in federal prison for taking bribes from inmates to smuggle contraband, including marijuana, into the Mize Street Detention Facility. Christopher Cox, 35, is the second jail guard there to be sentenced for contraband smuggling in two weeks. He copped to one count of conspiracy to smuggle contraband into a detention facility in exchange for bribes.
In Centennial, Colorado, the former Arapahoe County sheriff was sentenced last Thursday to 15 months in prison for repeatedly violation his probation after he was convicted of swapping meth for sex with young men. Patrick Sullivan, 71, had been sentenced to two years, but jail time had been in abeyance while he was on probation. He repeatedly tested positive for meth while on probation. Sullivan was the National Sheriff's Association "sheriff of the year" in 2001. He retired the following year, and then went over to the dark side
31.32

This video was first posted a few hours ago and it is one of the best so far- just plain cannabis science.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwpV8uYQy80
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Old 06-28-2014, 03:11 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

pimping his own wife, thats a new low. Darrion Keith Holiwell, 49. Gee did he marry a younger woman, plus physically abusing her? And more arrest to follow.


And one weeks low has turned out to be back at the normal rate. Yet the last item in Centennial, Colorado... One old sick man, this Patrick Sullivan, 71 who turned to the dark side.

If you add up all of these sorry LEO's law enforcement experience, the sting's and the time in courts what a total waste to each area's taxpayers
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Old 07-03-2014, 03:54 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

I NEVER THOUGHT I WOULD BE POSTING SOMETHING LIKE THIS ARTICLE WHEN I WAS JUST LAUGHING ABOUT TRYING TO KEEP POT OUT OF THE JAILS WHEN WE CAN'T KEEP IT OUT OF THE COUNTRY!!!

AN INDUSTRY EMERGES: THE NCIA CANNABIS BUSINESS SUMMIT IN DENVER [FEATURE]
An Industry Emerges: The NCIA Cannabis Business Summit in Denver [FEATURE] | StoptheDrugWar.org
The exhibition hall in the Denver Convention Center last week was a wonder to behold. Automated, high-capacity marijuana trimming machines. Industrial strength cannabis oil extraction devices. Marijuana real estate specialists. Marijuana accountants. Marijuana attorneys -- real estate, intellectual property, contracts. Marijuana consultants. Marijuana investment advisers. Point-of-sale marijuana sales tracking systems. Chemical testing companies. Vaporizer sellers. Odor-proof bag producers. Automated rolling machine makers. Anything and everything to do with the business of legal marijuana. All in a high-gloss trade show environment.

It was the National Cannabis Industry Association's (NCIA) Cannabis Business Summit, which brought more than 1,200 registrants to the state capital that for now at least is also the capital of legal marijuana. And it represents a new phase in the evolution of marijuana policy.
This is not your father's marijuana movement. There were lots of men in dark suits and ties, lots of women in snappy professional attire. A few dreadlocks here and there, but only a few. And nary a tie-dye to be found. There wasn't a whole lot of talk about how "We have to free the weed, man;" although social justice including ending prohibition came. up. There was a whole lot of talk about business opportunities, investment strategies, and how to profit from crumbling pot prohibition, as well as the dangers and pitfalls facing would-be entrepreneurs in an industry still illegal under federal law.
The legal marijuana industry has been bubbling up for awhile now, building from the quasi-legalization that is medical marijuana in Wild West California and the more regulated, but still thriving medical marijuana industry in states like Colorado, Oregon, and Washington. In the past decade or so, the High Times Cannabis Cup has evolved from a November trip to Amsterdam to a virtual traveling circus of all things pot-related. And marijuana trade expos have drawn crowds in the tens of thousands.
But one can reasonably argue that last week's Cannabusiness Summit represents the maturation of marijuana as an All-American business opportunity. With Colorado this week beginning to accept applications from people who don't represent medical marijuana dispensaries (for the first six months of commercial legalization, only operating dispensaries could apply) and Washington state set to see its first retail marijuana operations next week, the era of legal marijuana is truly upon us. And it's likely to continue to expand, with Alaska, Oregon, and Washington, DC, poised to join the ranks of the legalizers after elections later this year.

Talking up the product in the exhibition hall.
The Cannabis Business Summit was, unsurprisingly, mainly about the nuts and bolts of operating a legal marijuana business. It could have been any industrial trade show and conference, except this was about weed. Panels covered topics such as "Grow 101: Cultivation Facility Build-Out and Management Best Practices," "Advanced Cultivation: Scalability, Sustainability, and Growth Management," "Protecting Your Investment: Risk Management and Insurance for the Cannabis Industry," and "International CannaBusiness Opportunities." And that was just session one of day one.
Marijuana is an industry on a roll, and the NCIA can point to its own success as exhibit one.
"We now have over 600 marijuana business members, and that has doubled since January," said NCIA founder and executive director Aaron Smith in a keynote speech. "When Steve Fox and I started the NCIA in 2010, we had 20 members. Investors and entrepreneurs are rushing into this new space."
That, in turn, is allowing NCIA to expand its operations, Smith said.
"We're seeing more experienced business people because they understand what a trade association is," Smith explained. "So we've been able to staff up, we have a full-time DC lobbyist, which is a first for the industry, and we've already contacted every congressional office on the Hill and had sit-down meetings with half the House offices and 30 Senate offices. We're also attending campaign fundraisers on behalf of the NCIA."
Although the conference was all about business, Smith made clear that the NCIA had not forgotten that these business opportunities have come about because of a decades-long movement for social justice and human liberation around marijuana policy.
"We have to acknowledge those who came before us," he told his audience of businesspeople. "Before we were an industry, we were a movement, and we are still a social movement. The growth of this new industry will drive the final nail in the coffin of marijuana prohibition, so that no one is put in a cage for using a beneficial, extremely therapeutic herbal product ever again."

NCIA executive director Aaron Smith gives a keynote address.
The industry has to put its best face forward, Smith said.
"We are still under scrutiny, the world is watching Colorado and Washington, as well as the medical marijuana states, and we have to lead by example," he said. "Be a good neighbor and corporate citizen. Reach out to neighborhood associations and work with them. Contribute to the community. Be a model citizen. Be professional. Don't use marketing you wouldn't want your mother to see."
Smith wasn't the only NCIA officer to warn the industry it needed to watch its step. NCIA deputy director Taylor West had more words of wisdom in a session on marketing and communications.
"This is a cultural movement in the midst of an enormous wave, and we have the opportunity to define an idea on the rise, to be responsible, and to do the education around that," she said. "We are building an industry from scratch, and we have to take this opportunity to make this an industry that's not like every other industry."
That requires some maturity within the industry, the communications specialist said as she displayed tacky advertising images of scantily clad women covered in marijuana buds.
"Responsible branding is important," West noted. "Don't screw it up for everybody. We don't have a rock-solid foundation, and we're still very vulnerable from a public opinion and policy standpoint. Don't market to children and don't market like children," she said. "We're like the wine industry or craft beers or wellness. No one is ever drunk in a wine commercial. And," she said, pointing to the tacky ads, "don't alienate half the population."

fundraiser for the Florida medical marijuana initiative, at the Vicente-Sederberg law firm following the summit
There are many issues facing the nascent marijuana industry, but both the conference agenda and the talk in the corridors made it clear that the federal tax issue takes center stage. Under current federal law, marijuana remains illegal, and that means marijuana businesses cannot take standard business tax deductions under an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) provision known as 280E.
"This law must be changed, and this law can be changed. If Obama won't do it, we will do it for them," said marijuana tax attorney Henry Wykowski before heading deep into the weeds in a discussion of the intricacies of dealing with 280E.
"There is legislation to address this," said NCIA Capitol Hill lobbyist Mike Correia, pointing to Rep. Earl Blumenauer's (D-OR) House Resolution 2240, the Small Business Tax Equity Act of 2013.
But it's unlikely to go anywhere anytime time soon, Correia said. The congressional bill tracking service GovTrack.us agrees, giving the bill zero percent chance of passage this session.
"This is sitting in Ways and Means," Correia explained. "It's a Democratic bill in a Republican-controlled House, and the committee chairman is not a fan."
There is one back-door possibility for moving the bill, though, the lobbyist said.
"Every few years, the Congress addresses aspiring tax breaks," he noted. "They usually pass it in the middle of the night when no one is watching. I hope to have 280E provisions inserted into a bigger tax bill, but we need to get Republicans to support it. The Ways and Means members are not from marijuana-friendly states, so it's hard to get traction, but next year, Paul Ryan (R-WI) will be chair, and he could be more responsive."
The nascent marijuana industry has other issues, of course, but the Denver conference was a strong signal that the marijuana movement is indeed mutating into a marijuana industry. The power of American entrepreneurialism is very strong, and it looks like it's about to run right over the remnants of marijuana prohibition.
But the industry needs to remember that while we now have legal marijuana in two states, there are still 48 states to go. For people in Alabama or South Dakota or Utah, for example, the issue is not how much money you can make selling marijuana (or marijuana-related products or services), but the criminal -- and other -- consequences of getting caught with even small amounts. If the industry is indeed the movement, it needs to be putting its money where its mouth is to finish the work that remains to be done.

DANG!
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