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Law & Order Discuss If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the country? at the Political Forums; Xolo above means you nailed it....

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Old 11-01-2013, 07:18 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr



Xolo above means you nailed it.
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:04 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

A variation on the corrupt cops theme:
Quote:
THE CROOKED COP AND THE CASE OF THE VANISHING GUILTY PLEA [FEATURE]
The Crooked Cop and the Case of the Vanishing Guilty Plea [FEATURE] | StoptheDrugWar.org
Special to the Chronicle by Houston-based investigative journalist Clarence Walker, cwalkerinvestigates@gmail.com. This is the latest in his continuing series of stories about prosecutorial misconduct and police corruption in the drug war.
In an unusual recent case, the US 4th Circuit Appeals Court overturned a crack cocaine conviction despite the defendant having pleaded guilty. The case involving Baltimore drug dealer Cortez Leon Fisher was not overturned because the plea agreement was coerced or not voluntary -- the usual standard -- but because it was based on the lies of a corrupt police officer.

The case -- but not this tale -- began with an October 29, 2007 raid on Fisher's home executed by Baltimore police officer and DEA drug task force member Mark Lunsford. The search turned up crack cocaine and a loaded weapon. To avoid a decades-long stretch behind bars, Fisher copped a plea to one count of possession of crack cocaine with intent to distribute and one count of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Federal District Court Judge Frederick Motz then sentenced Fisher to 10 years in federal prison.
Fisher subsequently appealed to overturn his plea agreement after Lunsford was indicted on theft and perjury charges involving his use of bogus informants to falsely arrest and rip off drug dealers. In July 2010, the crooked cop got 20 months in federal prison for his crimes.
Lunsford's arrest and conviction uncovered a pattern of fabricating evidence to enrich police officers and selected informants, who received payments in cases in which they had not provided information. Reward money was fraudulently awarded to undeserving informants, and the proceeds were split between Lunsford and the snitches.
A search of Lunsford's home turned up jewelry belonging to alleged drug dealers and $46,000 in cash stolen from them. Federal prosecutors made no effort to return the stolen money to its rightful owners, but instead seized it for their own coffers.
But it gets worse. Lunsford also had a long history with Fisher and some of his family members, whom he had previously arrested on drug charges, some of which had been dismissed. In this light, Lunsford's pursuit of Fisher takes on the appearance of a personal vendetta.
When Fisher discovered that Lunsford had been indicted for perjury and theft in 2009, he wrote a pro se appeal to the judge who sentenced him, requesting that his guilty plea be vacated. But Judge Motz demurred.

Judge Fredrik Motz
"Unquestionably if the defendant had known of Lunsford's misconduct he would have filed a motion to suppress, and the motion may well have been successful," Motz wrote in denying the appeal. Nevertheless, "the defendant does not deny he was in possession of a firearm (as he admitted under oath during his Rule 11).Under these circumstances, I cannot find that a failure to allow defendant to withdraw his guilty plea would result in a 'miscarriage of justice.'"
Fisher appealed that decision to the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. In his appeal, Fisher wrote that Lunsford "set me up and arrested me unlawfully." The informant in the case, Fisher said in the appeal, "never gave Lunsford information concerning drug activities at Fisher's home." Citing prior arrests of Fisher by Lunsford years ago, the appeal went on to say that after Lunsford arrested Fisher in 2007 in the current case, "the officer returned to my apartment later, stole a safe containing all my jewelry specifically numerous diamonds with blue and red design, including a diamond watch."
The 4th Circuit overturned the trial judge. The key question for the court was whether a police officer's misrepresentations of facts invalidated a guilty plea under the due process clause. The court noted that in order to invalidate a plea, the defendant must show that egregious impermissible conduct preceded the entry of the plea and that the misconduct influenced the defendant's decision to plead guilty.
While one member of the three-judge panel voted to dismiss Fisher's appeal, arguing that "natural reaction of extreme distaste to Lunsford's criminal act does not instantaneously transform Fisher's guilty plea into some form of due process violation that permits him now to withdraw his plea," his was a dissenting opinion.
Judges James Wynn and Henry Floyd disagreed. Lunsford's lies influenced Fisher to cop a plea and his perjury "undermined the entire proceedings, thus rendering the defendant's pleas involuntary, and violated his due process rights," they wrote. "A plea based on law enforcement fraud is invalid even if the person is guilty," the court held in its ruling in the case.
Cortez Fisher is still behind bars, waiting to see if the US Attorney's Office in Maryland will dismiss his case. Meanwhile, Lunford, the dirty cop, has already been released from prison, as have other defendants caught up in Lunsford's perjury and bogus search warrants.
Fisher was scheduled to appear in court on October 25th to resolve the matter, but a court clerk told the Chronicle a new date has not been announced yet. Fisher's attorney, Marta Khan, did not respond to phone and email messages seeking comment about the matter.
"I was supposed to be home like the other people that they let go behind Lunsford's lies but I believe the feds will try to recharge me," Fisher told the Chronicle in a letter from prison."But I am ready for a new trial since I have all this new evidence."
Cop v. Drug Dealer
Baltimore police officer Mark Lunsford despised drug dealer Cortez Fisher. Their adversarial history stretches years to when Lunsford rode patrol near Baltimore's notorious Murphy Homes Project, where Fisher and his brother called "Midget" sold drugs, according to court documents.
Between 1993 and 2004, Lunsford's aggressive efforts to rid the crime-ridden community of drug dealers helped fellow narcotics officers make some of the cases against Fisher, including one particular case in 1999 when Fisher faced charges for armed marijuana trafficking.
In 2001, Fisher picked up another drug case, but was never convicted. Doggedly pursuing Fisher, Lunsford finally nailed him in 2004 on drug trafficking and a weapons charge filed in federal court. Fisher immediately copped a plea to serve 36 months in prison.
After finishing serving the 36 months, Fisher got nailed again on drug charges by Lunsford, this time costing him another 12 months behind bars. But Lunsford wasn't through yet.
In a search warrant affidavit dated October 29, 2007, Lunsford wrote that he received reliable information from a snitch that Fisher was selling drugs out of his house. Then, based on that false report, Lunsford claimed he personally saw Fisher sell drugs from his car. It was all a lie.
Court records filed in Fisher's case include a redacted FBI document dated October 23, 2009, where Lunsford admits that he fabricated source information in Fisher's and numerous other narcotics cases that sent citizens to prison. Lunsford told FBI agent that, fully aware of Fisher's involvement in the drug trade, he had lied when he said the informant he had named in the affidavit was the source of his information about Fisher.
Fisher may well have had a career as a drug dealer, but as the 4th Circuit noted, "even the guilty can suffer a miscarriage of justice."
Cortez Fisher remains imprisoned as he awaits word on what prosecutors will do. In the worst case, he will stay there until 2017. Meanwhile, the crooked cop whose perjurious information led to Fisher's arrest and subsequent plea bargain is a free man, not on parole, and not in the clutches of the criminal justice system.
For the guy from the mean streets of Baltimore, there is nothing left to do except to start over -- again.
"They took everything I had," he explained.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VsseaDzNf8
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The holdings of the rich are not legitimate if they are acquired through competition from which others are excluded, and made possible by laws that are shaped by the rich for the benefit of the rich. In these ways, economic inequality can undermine the conditions of its own legitimacy.
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:09 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
We took a week off from the Corrupt Cops stories, but the corrupt cops sure didn't. Here's a rather lengthy list of backlogged law enforcement miscreants. Let's get to it:

In Philadelphia, five Philadelphia police narcotics officers are under investigation for allegedly breaking into a woman's home and stealing valuables. The officers from the 24th District Narcotics Unit are being investigated by Internal Affairs. Witnesses saw the officers breaking in the home, they didn't have a warrant, and the homeowner filed a report the next morning. Some items stolen from the home were found at 24th District headquarters. The unnamed officers have been put on administrative leave pending investigation results.
In Fort Worth, Texas, a Fort Worth narcotics supervisor was arrested October 23 for allegedly stealing a pair of Air Jordan shoe during a failed drug raid the week before. Sgt. Antoine Williams was seen carrying the shoes out of the home that was raided, and his home was then raided by the department's Special Investigations Section the following days. The Air Jordans were recovered, and Williams is now on restricted duty. The raid victim, Marquis Green, said, "They didn't find no drugs in the house at all. They just took shoes that I ain't never wore. They is the bad guys, really. They just got a badge on their side; that's the only thing."
In New York City, an NYPD narcotics detective was arrested last Tuesday for giving two different sworn accounts of arresting an accused PCP dealer in East Harlem. Detective Abel Joseph, 39, first testified that he and his team had never lost sight of their target, but later testified that they had. He also claimed first that he was unable to find the alleged drug buyers, then later claimed that he had stopped and searched them, but found no drugs. The charges against the alleged dealer have been dismissed. Joseph is charged with felony perjury.
In La Crosse, Wisconsin, a former La Crosse police officer was formally charged last Wednesday in an August drug sting that led to his arrest and resignation. Former Lt. Brian Thompson is charged with possession of narcotics without a prescription. He went down after superiors noticed he was spending time in the evidence room outside the course of his normal duties and stung him by giving him a duffel bag containing fake Oxycontin pills and telling him to book it into evidence. He did, but the fake pills were missing. He later admitted taking and consuming them. He's looking at up to 3 years in prison.
In Winthrop, Massachusetts, a Winthrop auxiliary police officer was arrested last Thursday for allegedly dealing drugs in uniform and from his Auxiliary Police cruiser on several occasions. Officer Bledar Naco was arrested by the FBI, Winthrop and Revere police and faces currently unspecified charges.
In Cumberland, Maryland, an Allegheny County jail guard was arrested last Thursday after buying Oxycontin in a drug sting. William Smith, 26, went down after jail administrators received information he was involved in smuggling drugs into the jail. He is charged with conspiracy of a controlled dangerous substance possession with intent to distribute, conspiracy of possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to deliver in a place of confinement, and other offenses.
In New Orleans, a New Orleans police officer was arrested last Friday for getting involved in the cocaine trade. Officer Jason Cross is charged in federal court with possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute. The incident allegedly took place January 10 in Jefferson Parish. Cross resigned from the department the day of his arrest.
In Burlington, Vermont, a US Customs officer was arrested last Friday for stealing prescription drugs from vehicles he searched at the Canadian border. Christopher Vanzandt, 28, didn't get busted at work, but instead went to a house police were watching in a heroin investigation, broke into the garage, and stole some heroin hidden in WD-40 cans. That's when he was arrested. A subsequent search of his vehicle revealed the stolen pills. He was charged in state court with burglary and drug possession, but those charges will likely be dropped so he can be arraigned in federal court.
In Littleton, Colorado, a Littleton police officer pleaded guilty last Monday to planning to sell Ecstasy pills. Jeffrey Allan Johnston, 46, went down last summer after the FBI learned he was selling Ecstasy out of his home. He was arrested after buying 37 pills and 6.3 grams of powder Ecstasy from an undercover officer in July. Police also found cocaine, steroids, hundreds of prescription pills, and various weapons when they searched his home. He pleaded guilty to one count of possessing Ecstasy with intent to distribute and one count of being a prohibited person in possession of firearms. He is scheduled to be sentenced by US District Court Judge Philip A. Brimmer in February and is looking at up to 20 years in federal prison.
In Montclair, New Jersey, a Montclair police officer was convicted October 10 of being involved in an interstate marijuana sales operation. Anes Hadziefejzovic was accused of accompanying loads of marijuana from Maryland to New Jersey and was convicted of conspiracy to distribute more than 1,000 kilos of marijuana.
In Stillwater, Minnesota, a former Washington County sheriff's deputy was convicted Monday of stealing drugs from a locked pharmaceutical drop box in the county government building. Ricky Harry Gruber, 43, was found guilty of misconduct by a public employee and illegal possession of prescription drugs. He got caught on video removing the secure drug drum from the box and was arrested when he came back with it minutes later. He admitted having stolen the key to the secure area and taking the drugs.
In Little Rock, Arkansas, a former Little Rock police officer was sentenced last Wednesday to nearly nine years in prison on drug trafficking charges. Mark Jones and fellow officer Randall Robinson were arrested in June and charged with conspiracy to distribute more than 1,000 pounds of marijuana. Jones went immediately from court to jail.
In Oxford, Mississippi, a former Water Valley police officer was sentenced last Thursday to one year in prison for taking money from a drug trafficker in return for information about law enforcement. John David Hernandez, 35, had pleaded guilty to one count of extortion under color of official right, one count of money laundering, and one count of obstruction of a federal investigation. 4381

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CyuBuT_7I4
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The holdings of the rich are not legitimate if they are acquired through competition from which others are excluded, and made possible by laws that are shaped by the rich for the benefit of the rich. In these ways, economic inequality can undermine the conditions of its own legitimacy.
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:20 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Xolo your going to love this one, Tax it man, tax it Investers want some of this big profit. Also video at the site...

Quote:
New investors lighting up legal marijuana industry

Published: Friday, 8 Nov 2013 | 11:33 AM ET By: Jane Wells | CNBC Reporter

Cannabis-ness to top $10 billion in next 5 years

Friday, 8 Nov 2013 | 1:00 PM ET CNBC's

Jane Wells reports from the National Marijuana Business Conference that pot has become a very big business in this country and will top $10 billion in the next five years.It looks like any other business conference—lots of suits, name badges, a long line to the buffet—except that the 700 people who each paid $599 to be in this conference hall south of Seattle are in an industry unlike any other: marijuana.

"This conference is 100 percent focused on business," said Chris Walsh, editor of the Medical Marijuana Business Daily. His publication is sponsoring the National Marijuana Business Conference. Now in its second year, attendance has doubled, and more than 30 exhibitors paid as much as $16,000 to talk about investments, equipment, legal services and accounting.

"There's a lot of other types of shows out there that are for the typical stoners," Walsh said. "This is all business and financial."

The pot business is, well, growing. A Gallup poll shows that U.S. support for legalizing cannabis has reached 58 percent. Election night saw pro-marijuana laws passing in places such as Portland, Maine, and Lansing, Mich.

Getty Images
"It's an incredibly exciting time to be in the cannabis industry," said Tripp Keber, an investor and the managing director of Dixie Elixirs & Edibles, which sells products laced with THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient in pot) to medical marijuana dispensaries.



Business has tripled in 2013, according to Keber.

"Three years ago, nobody was interested in investing, but just yesterday I met with a hedge fund. I met with institutional investors," he said.

Investment action is ramping up as the two states that have legalized recreational "adult use" pot—Washington and Colorado—begin to issue licenses and the first retail outlets prepare to open. The federal government said in August that the Justice Department would not stop states from creating their own regulatory and taxation frameworks.

That federal decision to step back in turn unleashed "pent-up demand" from investors, said Troy Dayton, co-founder and CEO of the ArcView Group, which conducts market research on the pot industry. It recently released a report predicting that the legal marijuana business will increase 64 percent this year and top $10 billion within five years.

"This is the next great American industry," Dayton said.
Banking and taxes

But there are a few weeds in the weed patch. One is banking. Though the federal government is looking the other way, banks remain reluctant to offer a place for growers and sellers to safely store their cash.

At the same time, new private equity and venture capital investors are coming out of the woodwork. Many want to invest in products and services not directly related to pot itself, such as security systems and software programs.

(Read more: Slideshow: A gallery of medical marijuana)


"Mark Twain had a great quote," said Dayton. "He said that when there is a gold rush on, it's a good time to be in the pick and shovel business."

The larger dilemma, however, may be the taxes on recreational pot. How high is too high? Colorado voters passed a 25 percent tax on it, more than three times the state tax on medical pot. Washington has mandated a tax of at least 50 percent, versus no tax on medical marijuana.

Yet IMHO this will lead to it becoming legal. And then cost will settle down some.

......................... CONTINUED AT:
Marijuana business and investment growing as legalization efforts move forward
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:31 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

It's over. The chicken is still flopping around, but its head is cut off. Now that they know about the money, and the taxes- it's over -for illegal pot anyway.

And, they will be able to do huge studies on all its effects from painkilling to getting high. No one even knows what getting high or getting stoned is- in a scientific description; you know, if you've done it, but science has not really measured it. So far, all they have is anecdotal evidence.
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:35 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

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Originally Posted by Xolo View Post
It's over. The chicken is still flopping around, but its head is cut off. Now that they know about the money, and the taxes- it's over -for illegal pot anyway.

And, they will be able to do huge studies on all its effects from painkilling to getting high. No one even knows what getting high or getting stoned is- in a scientific description; you know, if you've done it, but science has not really measured it. So far, all they have is anecdotal evidence.
So if the feds get aboard I can get Federal Pot for all my pains and P.T.S.D. symptoms. Not in my life time.

I know one thing it does give my a mighty appetite, plus I get a lot more done around the house. Yet those days are now over.
As my one connection I dumped as he was stealing from me while we were suppose to be friends. I found in his home some of my missing tools etc.

So over 3 months ago I said good bye and removed his cell number from my cell. We have had NO contact sense that day. And I feel great yet eat less and do less here at home. they can't get things right quickly.

And till the NAM I never somked a thing, so the service got me on it. Kind of freaky..... So now the secrete is out for all to read.
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:01 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

LOL! It IS coming to that. I have a friend who qualifies for medical marijuana and she gets it through her AZ state health insurance.
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The holdings of the rich are not legitimate if they are acquired through competition from which others are excluded, and made possible by laws that are shaped by the rich for the benefit of the rich. In these ways, economic inequality can undermine the conditions of its own legitimacy.
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:28 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

A lot of us started smoking pot during the NAM era!

I left it behind when I had children, but have always thought the war on pot was awful. Pathetic..

I started saying a long time ago that all the businesses that are starting to happen, would happen, if they legalized it. I love it when I am correct, lol.

I think medical and legal pot will be a gold rush for quite a few years while all the possible start-up industries happen- Carver, and his products derived from cotton, will be pint-sized, when compared to what can be done with hemp fiber and seeds.

not to mention what having hemp fiber will do to the oil business, no more plastic rope that tears up hands when pulling up traps, for sails on boats, which will be hemp (again) as well. A lot less petroleum -and fracking- will be needed.

Hemp levis last a generation!

Ingesting hemp flowers, will rescue the economy, reduce dependency on health insurance- at least for work related stress and aching backs, LOL.

It will reduce dependency on opioids for chronic pain as well.

I could list more, but I think most readers already know

....... if not, scroll thru some of the recent non-music videos in this thread. I especially love that Henry Ford car, made in 1940 or so, that has a hemp plastic body, that wouldn't dent with a hammer, hemp interior and runs on hemp seed oil. (I think the engine itself is still metal)

Hey! Tesla motors! Think you are so cool? Where's the hemp in your cars?
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The holdings of the rich are not legitimate if they are acquired through competition from which others are excluded, and made possible by laws that are shaped by the rich for the benefit of the rich. In these ways, economic inequality can undermine the conditions of its own legitimacy.
T M Scanlon http://ideas.ted.com/the-4-biggest-r...d-for-society/

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Old 11-09-2013, 05:34 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Now lets not go Ben Franklin just yet

Yet your right so much made this country a place the English needed and most came from our trees and thousands of pounds of hemp plants once the growers got the leaves/buds off them.

Most American's just don't know how much in the early history of this country was hemp based.

All of our paper products & every important document is on hemp paper. About every average citizen wore hemp cloths.

Every rope made was from the hemp stem and many of the founders as well as citizens smoked it in their pipes.

Then tobacco was the craze yet the ones wanting more went to the hemp plant.

G. Washington told folks to grow a quarter of their fields with marijuana. And Jefferson had seeds from around the world so he could improve the plant.
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Old 11-14-2013, 01:16 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

This .story is worth reprinting. It is hard to believe how fast the resistance to cannabis is breaking down- but we have so many elderly, like me, and adults who tried it as a kid. Some quit, but KNOW pot is an almost harmless drug, compared to any other drug or medical herb, and some never quit and are older than I am, in fact the ones who avoid tobacco, alcohol and other recreational drugs are extremely fit for being in their 70's.(Seems like they probably eat healthy too) Pot doesn't age you as fast as alcohol and tobacco both do.

I am a person who has done all three and I do know the difference between one of those and pot! And I dare say that most folks reading this thread do too!

Quote:
MARYLAND MAJORITY FOR MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION
Maryland Majority for Marijuana Legalization | StoptheDrugWar.org
The latest evidence that marijuana legalization has reached the tipping point comes from Maryland, where a new Goucher Poll has a slim majority for legalization, as well as strong support for decriminalization and overwhelming support for medical marijuana.

The poll found that 51% supported marijuana legalization, while 90% supported medical marijuana if prescribed by a doctor.
The poll also asked whether marijuana possessors should be jailed, subjected to drug treatment, or fined. A near majority (49%) supported fines (or decriminalization), while 34% supported drug treatment, and only 6% supported jailing pot people.
"When it comes to marijuana use in the state, a slight majority of Marylanders support legalization for small amounts, and a large majority support the drug's use for medicinal purposes," said Mileah Kromer, director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center. "Citizens of the state also seem to support the decriminalization of marijuana, favoring policies that focus on rehabilitation and fines, rather than jail time for possession. This will be an issue to watch for the upcoming legislative session."
This year, the legislature approved a bill that authorized academic medical centers to distribute medical marijuana, but a decriminalization bill died in the House after passing the Senate.
The poll was conducted using both cell phones and land lines, with pollsters contacting 655 Maryland residents in late October. The margin of error is +/- 3.8%.
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If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the country? - Page 59 - Political Wrinkles This thread Refback 06-28-2014 06:39 PM
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