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Law & Order Discuss If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the country? at the Political Forums; Meth is absolutely the scariest- and it is mostly made in America, not from over the borders. It has messed ...

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Old 04-20-2011, 06:18 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Meth is absolutely the scariest- and it is mostly made in America, not from over the borders.

It has messed up more lives 10squared than any other drug.Tweakers are the scariest.

Did you know, the Nazis invented it and fed it to soldiers? The soldiers were all tweakers. Scary, huh? What a scourge on mankind.

God made cannabis,
Man made alcohol-
Nazis made meth-.
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Old 04-21-2011, 02:53 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/...t_cops_stories
Cops stealing drug money, jail guards smuggling dope, deputies helping traffickers... and narcs gone wild in Peoria. Just another week in the drug war. Let's get to it.

"Prohibition's filthy lucre is too much for some to resist (Image via Wikimedia)
In Edmond, Oklahoma, a former Edmond police officer was arrested earlier this month for allegedly stealing $8,000 in drug bust money from the department evidence room. Benjamin Northcutt, 35, is charged with grand larceny. The cash was seized during a drug raid last August, and Northcutt was in the room when they money was counted and packaged before being placed in an evidence locker. Police videos show that Northcutt entered and exited the evidence room alone 14 times between then and the time the money was discovered missing the next morning. He has denied taking it and is out on $2,000 bail.

In Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a Baton Rouge police officer was arrested April 12 for allegedly stealing about $15,000 in seized drug money. Officer Michael Thompson, 27, admitted that he was strung out on prescription pain pills and took the money to fund his addiction, Baton Rouge police said. Thompson was a five-year veteran of the department and was assigned to the Narcotics Division at the time of his arrest. He resigned from the force shortly after being arrested. He faces seven counts of felony theft and one count of malfeasance in office.

In Peoria, Illinois, three Chicago-area undercover narcs were arrested April 13 after they started fighting with bouncers at a local strip club. The three are members of the Metropolitan Area Narcotics Squad who were attending a law enforcement conference when one of them was denied entry to the club because he had no ID. That angered the other officers, and bouncers invited them to leave, prompting one to respond, "Why don't you try and make me?" while another assaulted a bouncer. The club called Peoria police, who arrested them as the brawl spread into the club's parking lot. One narc got two counts of battery, one got one count of battery, and one got one count of battery and one count of criminal trespass. All the offenses are misdemeanors. The suspects remain unnamed because naming them could jeopardize the safety of "ongoing undercover operations," Peoria police said.

In Boston, a Massachusetts corrections officer was arrested Monday for allegedly trying to smuggle heroin to sell to inmates at a medium-security prison in Norfolk. Guard Ronald McGinn Jr., 40, went down after plotting with and sending text messages to an undercover FBI agent about the amounts of drugs he would smuggle into the prison and what he would be paid for his efforts. He was carrying 28 grams of heroin when arrested. He is charged with possession of heroin with intent to distribute at a prison. He's looking at up to 20 years in prison.

In Houston, a former Harris County deputy pleaded guilty April 14 to using his position to protect someone in a drug case in return for cash. George Ellington, 38, admitted accessing confidential information from a law enforcement database to protect a person he believed was transporting Ecstasy. He was to receive $500. Instead, he has now pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and is looking at a five-year prison sentence.

In Newark, New Jersey, a former state corrections officer pleaded guilty Monday to charges he fronted a complex contraband-smuggling ring that included heroin, cocaine, marijuana, and cell phones. Luis Roman admitted making thousands of dollars in a scheme involving 35 other people. He pleaded guilty to racketeering and official misconduct charges for running smuggling rings at the Adult Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Avenel and then at Northern State Prison in Newark. He's looking at 14 years in prison. Sixteen prisoners and 18 others have also been indicted in the scheme, and five have so far pleaded guilty."

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Old 04-28-2011, 02:08 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES 4226
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org

"Cops ripping off drug dealers, cops offering information to drug defendants, sheriffs escorting cartel dope loads, and, oh, yes, prison guards gone bad. Here's this week's rogues' gallery:

Prohibition's filthy lucre is hard for some to resist (Image via Wikimedia)
In New York City, a former NYPD officer pleaded guilty Monday to ripping off at least 100 drug dealers with a gang that scored a million dollars in cash and more than 500 pounds of cocaine during its decade-long spree. Emmanuel Tavarez, 31, an eight-year veteran of the force, used his badge, service weapon, and stolen NYPD raid jackets to stage fake searches of drug dealers and seizure of their stashes along with his co-conspirators. Tavarez went down after a lengthy investigation into the robberies. He now faces up to life in prison after pleading guilty to robbery conspiracy, conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine, and using a firearm in the commission of a crime. A dozen of his co-conspirators have charges pending, including four of his in-laws.

In McAllen, Texas, the former Sullivan City police chief was sentenced April 20 to 10 years in federal prison for his role in protecting Mexican drug traffickers moving two tons of pot through his town. Hernan Guerra, 45, had been arrested at his office last June by FBI agents after they wiretapped his office as part of Operation Deliverance, a massive, nationwide, 430-person bust targeting the cartels. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute drugs. He faced a minimum of seven years and four months in prison, but his sentencing judge gave him some bonus time for being a crooked cop. He's also got four years of probation to do.

In Tallahassee, Florida, a Florida prison guard was arrested April 20 on charges he was scheming to sell drugs to prisoners. Guard Janus Isaiah Edwards went down after an inmate snitched him out and corrections and Leon County Sheriff's investigators set him up with undercover officers. Edwards agreed to smuggle in 100 hydrocodone tablets and 11 grams of cocaine in return for $1,000. He is now charged with introduction of drugs to a prison, unlawful compensation, trafficking in hydrocodone, possession of cocaine, and possession with intent to deliver.

In Lebanon, Tennessee, a Wilson County sheriff's deputy was arrested April 20 for trying to sell information about a federal drug investigation to a target of that investigation in return for $100,000 and a Range Rover. Deputy John Patrick Edwards, 38, had been a member of the FBI's regional drug task force, but lost that gig after being arrested in March on an unrelated theft charge involving his wife and another woman. He was also suspended without pay, leaving him in need of some quick cash. Edwards approached a business partner who knew someone who was a target of the investigation and offered to sell information that could help the target "lessen the blow" and end up with less prison time. But now, Edwards looks to be the one doing prison time; he's looking at 20 years in prison for attempting to obstruct, influence, and impede an official proceeding."
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Old 04-29-2011, 02:46 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Looks like some judges are waking up to this problem and giving out more time. Which to me is a step in the right direction...

Maybe schools need to have classes on Honor, duty and just doing the right things...

Cause these gangs are not slowing down, and these reports aren't going to stop just over more prison time.

5 in one family is just plain corruption, if they were in other jobs these people would have done wrong.
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Old 05-06-2011, 04:47 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Same ol', same ol', same ol'.

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES 4439
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
Perverted probation officers, greedy jail guards, and a perjury plot backfires. Let's get to it:

In Portland, Oregon, a former US probation officer pleaded guilty April 28 to coercing sexual favors from female defendants, including drug offenders, under his supervision. Mark John Walker, 52, admitted to violating the victims' constitutional rights to bodily integrity while acting under color of law. In one case, Walker forced the victim to have sex with him against her will when he visited her home as part of his official duties. In other cases, he kissed victims or touched their breasts, buttocks, and inner thighs without their consent. Under the plea agreement, both sides have agreed to recommend a 10-year prison sentence when he is sentenced June 18.

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, a Middlesex County Sheriff's Department sergeant was arrested Monday on drug charges after allegedly receiving cocaine from an undercover state trooper. Sgt. Michael Dell'Isola, 51, is charged with trafficking cocaine. He went down after the sheriff's office received an anonymous tip last month and ended up setting up a sting. Dell'Isola, who worked at the Cambridge Jail, took cocaine and $500 cash from the undercover trooper, and was arrested on the spot. The 28-year veteran was being held pending a bail hearing.

In Detroit, a former Inskster police officer was sentenced Tuesday for his role in a perjury scheme in a 2005 cocaine trafficking trial. Robert McArthur was sentenced to 90 days in jail for misdemeanor willful neglect of duty. He could have faced up to life in prison on felony perjury charges, but accepted a plea bargain that includes his testifying next month against one of his co-defendants, retired Wayne County Judge Mary Waterstone. McArthur, Waterstone, another Inkster police officer, and Wayne County's former top drug prosecutor were all charged with perjury for letting a paid police informant testify without revealing that he was a key participant in the operation. Former prosecutor Karen Plants and former Inskter Police Sgt. Scott Rechtzigel have also take plea deals in the case and received short jail sentences. Waterstone has turned down all plea offers and faces trail June 7.
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Old 05-07-2011, 03:33 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

Bad cops turn rats still should not get off so light.. What was so sad becomes even sadder.

I bet the former judge gets off light to.
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Old 05-08-2011, 02:29 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

And we could whip the rug out from under them by legalizing and regulating pot and then law enforcement could concentrate their tactics on local meth operations. Compared to even heroin and cocaine, meth is the worst street drug ever.

Pot doesn't belong with those other drugs. I am with Ron Paul on this one.
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Old 05-12-2011, 02:08 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

I am really furious at today's corrupt cops. A prosecutor who got just 180 days in prison!

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES 4569
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org
A Texas DA is on the wrong side of the bars, and so is a Kentucky jail guard. Meanwhile, crooked cops in Philly and California's East Bay have their own problems. Let's get to it:

In San Ramon, California, a former Central Costa County Narcotics Enforcement Team member was arrested May 4 in an expanding Contra Costa County drug corruption case. San Ramon Police Officer Louis Lombardi is believed to be involved in a corruption case involving the task force commander, a Contra Costa County sheriff's deputy, and a private investigator, all of whom were arrested in March. They are accused, among other things, of stealing and reselling drugs and ginning up false DUI arrests. Lombardi's specific charges include possession of stolen property, including guns, IDs, and drugs; grand theft of weapons, possession of an illegal assault rifle, and conspiracy. At last report, he was in jail with a $760,000 bond.

In Shively, Kentucky, a Bullitt County jail guard was arrested May 5 after being caught with 28 hydrocodone pills, 28 1/2 oxymorphone pills, six doses of anabolic steroids, three syringes, three needles, a gun and ammunition during a traffic stop. Eric Risen, 26, is charged with four counts of trafficking in a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and disregarding a traffic signal, Shively police said. He was released on his own recognizance and will be arraigned in court early next week.

In Alice, Texas, the former Jim Wells and Brooks County district attorney was sentenced Friday to 180 days in jail for the criminal misuse of asset forfeiture funds. Former DA Joe Frank Garza, 64, must also serve 10 years probation and repay $2 million in funds misappropriated for his personal use. Under Texas law, prosecutors must have the okay of the county commission before spending seized cash on salary increases or the personal benefit of employees, but Garza never bothered to do that with funds seized between 2002 and 2008.

In Philadelphia, two former Philadelphia police officers were sentenced this week in a plot to rip-off drug dealers and resell their heroin. Robert Snyder, 30, got 13 years in prison, while a day earlier, James Venziale got 42 months for his role. They were two of three officers arrested last year in the scheme that also involved Snyder's wife, Cristal, and her sister's drug dealing boyfriend. Venziale got less time because he became a cooperating witness. He testified that he and Snyder got $3,000 each for robbing one dealer. The criminal cops went down in an FBI sting after word of their activities percolated up from the street.
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Old 05-12-2011, 02:33 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

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Originally Posted by Xolo View Post
And we could whip the rug out from under them by legalizing and regulating pot and then law enforcement could concentrate their tactics on local meth operations. Compared to even heroin and cocaine, meth is the worst street drug ever.

Pot doesn't belong with those other drugs. I am with Ron Paul on this one.
And another reason I did not like Nixon, placing pot with these other hard drugs...

Great posting Xolo...
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:39 PM
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Default Re: If we can't keep drugs out of the prisons, how can we keep them out of the countr

THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES 4732
This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories | StoptheDrugWar.org

Quote:
San Francisco narcs with some explaining to do, a Kentucky sheriff gone wild, a California cop gone rogue, and an Iowa cop with a troublesome cocaine habit. Let's get to it:

In San Francisco, the city public defender is accusing undercover narcotics officers of stealing from suspects. For the second time in a week, Public Defender Jeff Adachi has released surveillance video footage that shows two officers walking into a residential hotel empty handed and leaving with bags that were not booked into evidence. One of the men whose rooms were searched, Jesus Reyes, said he recognized a backpack that was his being carried off. It contained a laptop computer and Sony digital camera. The officers with the bag were identified as Richard Guerrero and Reynaldo Vargas. Guerrero faces similar allegations in another case. Reyes was charged with meth possession, but those charges were dropped when Guerrero did not show up for court after being subpoenaed. SFPD officials said five officers seen on the video had been removed from plainclothes duty. The other three are Jacob Fegan, Christopher Servat, and Adam Kujath. This marks the second time in the past week Adachi has used video footage to allege police conducted illegal searches or stole from suspects. The revelations have prompted the dismissal of nearly a hundred cases and led the FBI to open an investigation. Stay tuned.

In London, Kentucky, the former Whitley County sheriff pleaded guilty last Thursday to extortion, drug, and conspiracy charges for a pattern of conduct that extended throughout his stay in office. In pleading guilty, Lawrence Hodges acknowledged that he had been popping pain pills, ripping off cash from the office, and extorting drug dealers by busting them and then funneling them to a local attorney. Hodges got $50,000 in kickbacks, the sheriff's office got $50,000 in "donations," and the dealers got more lenient treatment. He admitted stealing $64,897 from the sheriff's office, part of which went to buy pain pills. He also admitted looking the other way on drug sales by his favored dealers. Prosecutors are recommending 15-years in prison when he is sentenced in August. Hodges also faces a state court prosecution in which he is charged with stealing $350,000 from his office. He has pleaded not guilty to that charge. He was jailed pending sentencing.

In Eureka, California, a former Eureka police officer was charged April 14 on a raft of counts suggesting he was a rogue officer. Daniel Kalis had been under investigation since January by the Humboldt County district attorney's office, and the Eureka Police initiated their own investigation in March. On March 7, Kalis was placed on leave. He resigned early in April. He is charged with possession of a controlled substance (heroin), unauthorized communication with a prisoner, possession of more than an ounce of marijuana, false imprisonment, possession of controlled substances without a prescription, unauthorized disclosure of motor vehicle records, unauthorized access to a computer network, petty theft, and vandalism. More charges could be pending.

In Muscatine, Iowa, a former Muscatine police officer pleaded guilty last Friday to drug and theft charges. Scott Burk, 48, was arrested last August after an investigation by state and local police. Authorities found cocaine in his vehicle and home, along with missing funds from the Muscatine County Drug Task Force. He pleaded guilty to cocaine possession, a drug tax stamp violation, and second-degree theft charges. He faces a year for the possession charge, and five years each for the other two. He will be sentenced in July. His attorney said Burke is currently in drug treatment and will seek probation.
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