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History, Geography, & Military Discuss Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea at the Political Forums; Somehow in it's drive to upgrade the U.S. Navy repairs, need for sleep and no time for training were found ...

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Old 08-27-2017, 05:40 PM
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Default Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea

Somehow in it's drive to upgrade the U.S. Navy repairs, need for sleep and no time for training were found to be the answer to four collisions this year alone, and the sacking of top commanders last week it appears the Navy is now aware.



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Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea, Sailors Warn
NYTimes, By DAVE PHILIPPS and ERIC SCHMITT... 12 mins ago


WASHINGTON — Two deadly collisions between high-tech destroyers and easy-to-spot, slow moving cargo ships in little over two months have stunned many in the Navy and sent top leaders scrambling for answers.

But shipboard veterans had long seen signs of trouble. Factor in a shrinking Navy performing the same duties as a larger fleet did a decade ago, constant deployments that leave little time to train and relentless duties that require sailors driving 9,000 ton vessels to endure sleepless stretches that would be illegal for bus drivers and avoidable accidents can happen, current and former officers say.

“What seems impossible — that two ships could hit in the middle of the ocean — becomes very real,” said Robert McFall, a former Navy lieutenant commander who served as the operations officer of the destroyer Fitzgerald in 2014. “If you are not at your best, events can start that lead to a disaster.”

.................................................. . Continued
Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea, Sailors Warn
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Old 09-24-2017, 03:38 PM
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Red face Re: Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea

One big mistake comes from a lot of little ones...

Navy Admiral: Catastrophic Collisions Result From Accumulation of Small Errors
September 20, 2017 | - Navy officials are not ready to say what is causing U.S. Navy destroyers to collide with merchant vessels, but at a hearing on Tuesday, they spoke in general terms about the human factor: "These catastrophes really result from the accumulation of a number of small errors that build up and line up eventually to create a sequence that results in an incident of this magnitude," Admiral John Richardson told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
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Last month, ten sailors died when the USS John S. McCain collided with an oil tanker in a shipping channel off the coast of Singapore. And in June, seven sailors died when the USS Fitzgerald ran into a cargo ship in the Sea of Japan. "Every boat in the Gulf of Maine has a radar on it that tells us when there's another boat within a mile or two miles or five miles -- an alarm goes off, it shows up on your GPS," Sen. Angus King of Maine told Richardson. "How in the world does a billion dollar destroyer not know that there's a freighter closing in on it?" King asked. "Sir, (we) got the same questions," Richardson replied. "It's very hard to understand, with the sophisticated systems onboard these warships, that we'd let a ship get in that close, to the point of collision."

King also asked about the radars on the merchant ships: "Is there some technology that they couldn't see us?" "It wouldn't surprise anybody, I think, that we design our warships to have a lower radar cross-section, some designed to be very low," Richardson replied. "So that degree of stealth makes us more effective from a warfighting standpoint. But that also imposes a burden, if you will, on the crew of that (U.S.) ship to understand that they are low-observable and they may not be as easily seen as something that is as large as a destroyer. They'll have a radar cross-section of a ship that is much smaller."

Since the recent collisions, the Navy has directed its ships to turn on their Automatic Identification Systems, particularly in heavily trafficked areas, so other ships will know the U.S. Navy is in the area. Richardson also explained that for safety reasons, there are many redundancies on the bridge of an advanced Navy destroyer: "The watch team will be on the order of ten people. About four of those will be officers -- the officer of the deck, the junior officer of the deck, officer of the watch, conning officer. There'll be two lookouts, there'll be a quartermaster. And so there's plenty of people involved in this seamanship and navigation on the bridge. "They're supported by a team in the combat information center, which is also looking at electronic displays; they don't have windows, but they're backing them up," Richardson said.

And with respect to the technology, all critical systems, such as navigation, steering, and propulsion, all have back-up systems," Richardson added. "So there's a lot of redundancy built into these systems because they are so fundamental to safety. So now you get a sense...how could all of that break down so catastrophically to result in a collision of this magnitude? And that's why we have to do the thorough investigation.

https://www.cnsnews.com/news/article...n-small-errors
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:27 PM
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Default Re: Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea

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Originally Posted by waltky View Post
One big mistake comes from a lot of little ones...

Navy Admiral: Catastrophic Collisions Result From Accumulation of Small Errors
September 20, 2017 | - Navy officials are not ready to say what is causing U.S. Navy destroyers to collide with merchant vessels, but at a hearing on Tuesday, they spoke in general terms about the human factor: "These catastrophes really result from the accumulation of a number of small errors that build up and line up eventually to create a sequence that results in an incident of this magnitude," Admiral John Richardson told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
WTF........ It took this year alone 4 collisions and 17 plus sailors lives. And the number of injuries. So the top brass of the Navy could come to this lame conclusion.

Those errors are man made errors, right?

Quote:
Navy Admiral: Catastrophic Collisions Result From Accumulation of Small Errors

September 20, 2017 | - Navy officials are not ready to say what is causing U.S. Navy destroyers to collide with merchant vessels, but at a hearing on Tuesday, they spoke in general terms about the human factor: "These catastrophes really result from the accumulation of a number of small errors that build up and line up eventually to create a sequence that results in an incident of this magnitude," Admiral John Richardson told the Senate Armed Services Committee.
And they already had this to work with...

Quote:
Factor in a shrinking Navy performing the same duties as a larger fleet did a decade ago, constant deployments that leave little time to train and relentless duties that require sailors driving 9,000 ton vessels to endure sleepless stretches that would be illegal for bus drivers and avoidable accidents can happen, current and former officers say.
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Old 11-06-2017, 09:40 AM
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Question Re: Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea

Mistakes in the USS Fitzgerald mishap...

Watchstanders Looking Wrong Way Before Fitzgerald Collision: Navy
1 Nov 2017 | Under the "international rules of the road" governing maneuver at sea, a ship crossing navigation paths with other vessels is obligated to give ships on its starboard, or right, side, the right of way. This entails maneuvering to stay clear of other ships and to avoid endangering them.
Quote:
But when the guided-missile destroyer Fitzgerald approached the Philippines-flagged container ship ACX Crystal to its starboard side in the wee hours on June 17, no such precautions were taken, according to a new command investigation released Wednesday. The investigation, which faulted leaders and watchstanders for a series of poor choices and failures to act that ultimately resulted in a deadly collision, raised questions about fatigue levels and knowledge gaps that could have contributed to the errors. Moreover, investigators note, the ship had previously experienced a near-collision in mid-May, but hadn't taken steps to fix problems in operations. "Leadership made no effort to determine the root causes and take corrective actions to improve the ship's performance," they found. The investigation did not detail the causes or the circumstances of that near-miss.


The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald sits in Dry Dock 4 at Fleet Activities Yokosuka to continue repairs and assess damage sustained from its June 17, 2017 collision with a merchant vessel.

The June 17 collision took place about 56 nautical miles to the southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. The ship had recently passed Oshima Island in the Philippine Sea, a busier shipping lane with increased traffic from merchant vessels. Around 1 a.m., as the Fitzgerald operated with the "darkened ship" procedures reserved for nighttime operations, it approached three merchant vessels traveling eastbound to the ship's starboard side. "The closest point of approach of these vessels and the Fitzgerald was minimal, with each presenting a risk of collision," investigators wrote.


The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka, Japan, on June 17, 2017, following a collision with a merchant vessel.

But the ship's crew appeared completely unaware of impending danger. From 1 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., when the Fitzgerald and the Crystal collided, the Fitzgerald remained on its course, cruising through the water at 20 knots. Neither vessel initiated bridge communications with the other or sounded a danger signal. Investigators found, among other things, that watchstanders performing physical lookout duties were doing so only on the port, or left, side of the ship, despite the fact that there were three ships presenting a possible collision threat on the starboard side. At 1:10 a.m., watchstanders tried to get a radar track on the Crystal, but were unsuccessful in doing so. Instead, the officer of the deck plotted out a radar track for a ship believed to be the Crystal, and determined it would pass 1,500 yards from the Fitzgerald on the starboard side. In fact, the two ships were on a collision course, and both were maintaining a high rate of speed.


FILE - In this June 18, 2017 photo, the damaged USS Fitzgerald is docked at the U.S. Naval base in Yokosuka after colliding with the container ship ACX Crystal off Japan.

An official timeline shows indications of panic just before the ships collided. Three minutes before the collision, the officer of the deck ordered the Fitzgerald to change course, then immediately rescinded the order. Then, the officer of the deck ordered an increase to full speed and a rapid turn to the left. The order was not followed. One minute before the crash, the boatswain's mate of the watch took the helm and started giving orders. By then, the disaster was inevitable. Ultimately, seven sailors would die when their compartment, Berthing 2, was flooded. Among those who sustained significant injuries was the ship's commanding officer, Cmdr. Bryce Benson, who had to be rescued as he dangled from the side of a ship after his stateroom was destroyed. He would ultimately be medically evacuated from the ship.

Those killed in the collision include:
See also:

USS Fitzgerald Crash: No Physical Lookouts on Right Side of Ship Where Collision Happened
November 1, 2017 | "The sky was dark, the moon was relatively bright" on the night of June 17, when the USS Fitzgerald, a Navy destroyer, collided with a Phillipines-flagged container ship in the waters off Japan.
Quote:
That's according to the U.S. Navy, which on Tuesday released its report on both the Fitzgerald and the USS McCain collisions at sea. Seven sailors died on the Fitzgerald, and collision of the USS McCain with a Libyan-flagged oil tanker two months later killed ten more sailors. Both crashes were avoidable, the Navy concluded, and stemmed from failure to follow international nautical rules as well as various knowledge, training, and leadership deficiencies.

One glaring omission on the Fitzgerald: “Watchstanders performing physical lookout duties did so only on Fitzgerald’s left (port) side, not on the right (starboard) side where the three ships were present with risk of collision.” The container ship slammed into the Fitzgerald’s starboard side.

In general, the Navy noted that the commanding officer has “absolute” responsibility for his or her ship. “Many of the decisions made that led to this incident were the result of poor judgment and decision making of the Commanding Officer,” the report said, adding that “no single person bears full responsibility for this incident.”

The report said Fitzgerald officers “possessed an unsatisfactory level of knowledge of the International Rules of the Nautical Road,” and “watch team members were not familiar with basic radar fundamentals, impeding effective use.”

Specifically:
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Old 11-07-2017, 03:44 PM
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Default Re: Fatigue and Training Gaps Spell Disaster at Sea

All of that to say this........

Quote:
The report said Fitzgerald officers “possessed an unsatisfactory level of knowledge of the International Rules of the Nautical Road,” and “watch team members were not familiar with basic radar fundamentals, impeding effective use.”


Where is the Navy training it's ofcers, at omeold Army base n ths? sfi

officers at some old army base in the woods?
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