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History, Geography, & Military Discuss Notable Military Obituaries at the Political Forums; Army Veteran Who Wrote Wounded Warrior Creed Passes Away... Army Veteran Who Wrote Wounded Warrior Creed Dies 8 Aug 2017 ...

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Old 08-14-2017, 08:58 AM
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Army Veteran Who Wrote Wounded Warrior Creed Passes Away...

Army Veteran Who Wrote Wounded Warrior Creed Dies
8 Aug 2017 | A paralyzed veteran who wrote the official Wounded Warrior Creed adopted by the Marine Corps has died.
Quote:
Retired Army Sgt. Joseph "Joey" Smith, a career military man who also served in the Marines, died Sunday at Kindred Hospital in Greensboro, following a massive stroke he suffered in May. Smith, who lived in Thomasville, was 46. "Joe was a patriot more than anything, and he loved his country," said Smith's ex-wife, Debbi, a former High Pointer who remained friends with Smith after their divorce earlier this year. "He said to me many times that even though he was hurt, he would go back to Afghanistan to serve, even in his wheelchair. He was a very proud American, he was proud of his country and he was proud that he could serve."

In 2005, during Smith's fourth deployment in Afghanistan, he suffered a spinal-cord injury that left him paralyzed from the waist down. While hospitalized and watching the struggles of his fellow injured soldiers -- not to mention struggling to find purpose in his own life -- Smith penned the inspirational words that the Marine Corps later would adopt as its own "Creed of the Wounded Warrior." "Though I am wounded," he wrote, "I will always be a warrior. I will never give up, nor quit in the face of adversity. I will do my best in all that I do and achieve. I will not allow my injuries to limit me, and most of all, I will never forget my fallen comrades or leave a fellow injured warrior behind."


Retired Army Sgt. Joseph C. Smith

The creed and what it represented meant a lot to Smith, his ex-wife said. "That was something he was very proud of," she said. "A lot of the wounded warriors said he was very inspirational to them." Smith lived up to the creed, too, competing for several years in the Warrior Games, an annual, Olympic-style sports competition for wounded or ill military personnel and veterans. He won a gold medal in the air rifle competition, and competed in other sports such as swimming and archery.

He and his then-wife settled in Thomasville in 2011, when they moved into a new, handicap-accessible house provided through Homes For Our Troops, a nonprofit organization that builds houses for severely injured veterans. The approximately 2,400-square-foot house gave Smith a level of independence he would not have had otherwise. As of Monday afternoon, funeral plans for Smith were not yet complete, but Debbi Smith said a celebration-of-life service will be held, and Smith likely will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. "He deserves that," she said. "He earned it."

Army Veteran Who Wrote Wounded Warrior Creed Dies | Military.com
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:11 AM
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Member of Navajo Code Talkers Dies at Age 94...

Tribe: Navajo Code Talker Dies at Age 94 in New Mexico
10 Oct 2017 A Navajo code talker who used the Navajo language to outsmart the Japanese in World War II has died in New Mexico, Navajo Nation officials said.
Quote:
David Patterson Sr. died Sunday in Rio Rancho at age 94 from pneumonia and complications from subdural hematoma. Although Patterson didn't talk much about his service, one of his sons said his father was proud of being a Navajo Code Talker. "He attended as many Code Talker events as he could," Pat Patterson said. "It was only when his health started to decline that he didn't attend as many."


A member of the Navajo Code Talkers views a performance by Marine Corps Band New Orleans during a parade for National Navajo Code Talkers Day

Patterson served in the Marine Corps from 1943 to 1945 and was the recipient of the Silver Congressional Medal of Honor in 2001. After his military service, Patterson became a social worker and worked for the tribe's Division of Social Services until retiring in 1987. He raised his family in Oklahoma, California and Shiprock, New Mexico, and is survived by six children.

Pat Patterson told the Farmington Daily-Times that his father moved to Rio Rancho in 2012 to live with his youngest son. Funeral services are pending and will be held at Christ The King Catholic Church in Shiprock, New Mexico. Patterson will be buried on the military side of the Shiprock Cemetery.

Tribe: Navajo Code Talker Dies at Age 94 in New Mexico | Military.com
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Old 10-25-2017, 01:13 AM
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Commander of 1st Flight of Space Shuttle Challenger Dies...

Commander of 1st Flight of Space Shuttle Challenger Dies
24 Oct 2017 Paul Weitz, a retired NASA astronaut who also piloted the Skylab in the early 1970s, has died. He was 85.
Quote:
Weitz died at his retirement home in Flagstaff, Arizona, on Monday, said Laura Cutchens of the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation. No cause of death was given. A NASA biography says Weitz was among the class of 19 astronauts who were chosen in April 1966. He served as command module pilot on the first crew of the orbiting space laboratory known as Skylab during a 28-day mission in 1973. Weitz also commanded the first launch of the shuttle Challenger in April 1983. The five-day mission took off from the Kennedy space Center in Florida and landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Challenger was destroyed and seven crew members killed during its 10th launch on January 28, 1986.


In this June 30, 1982, photo, the new space shuttle Challenger sits behind the four astronauts that will fly it during turnover ceremonies at Rockwell International's final assembly site in Palmdale, Calif. From left: Dr. Story Musgrave, pilot Karol J. Bobko, mission specialist Donald H. Peterson and commander Paul J. Weitz. Weitz, a retired NASA astronaut who commanded the first flight of the space shuttle Challenger and flew on Skylab in the early 1970s, has died at 85. Weitz died at his retirement home in Flagstaff on Oct. 23, 2017, said Laura Cutchens of the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation.

In all, he logged 793 hours in space and retired as deputy director of the Johnson Space Center in May 1994. Weitz was born in Erie, Pennsylvania, on July 25, 1932, and graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1954, according to NASA. He then joined the Navy, serving on a destroyer before being chosen for flight training and earning his wings as a Naval Aviator in September 1956. He served in various naval squadrons, including service in Vietnam, before joining the Astronaut Corps. According to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, Weitz returned to the Navy after his mission on Skylab mission and retired as a captain in July 1976 after serving 22 years. He then came out of retirement to re-join NASA. "Paul Weitz's name will always be synonymous with the space shuttle Challenger. But he also will be remembered for defying the laws of gravity - and age," said Curtis Brown, board chairman of the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation and an astronaut and veteran of six space flights. "Before it became commonplace to come out of retirement, Paul was a pioneer. He proved 51 was just a number."

The foundation is supported by astronauts from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and Space Station programs and annually provides scholarships for 45 students.

Commander of 1st Flight of Space Shuttle Challenger Dies | Military.com
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Paul Weitz, commander of 1st flight of space shuttle Challenger, dies
Oct. 24, 2017 Paul Weitz, a retired NASA astronaut who commanded the first flight of the space shuttle Challenger and also piloted the Skylab in the early 1970s, has died. He was 85.
Quote:
Weitz died at his retirement home in Flagstaff on Monday, said Laura Cutchens of the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation. No cause of death was given. A NASA biography says Weitz was among the class of 19 astronauts who were chosen in April 1966. He served as command module pilot on the first crew of the orbiting space laboratory known as Skylab during a 28-day mission in 1973.

Weitz also commanded the first launch of the shuttle Challenger in April 1983. The five-day mission took off from the Kennedy space Center in Florida and landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Challenger was destroyed and seven crew members killed during its 10th launch on Jan. 28, 1986. In all, he logged 793 hours in space and retired as deputy director of the Johnson Space Center in May 1994.

Weitz was born in Erie, Pennsylvania, on July 25, 1932, and graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1954, according to NASA. He then joined the Navy, serving on a destroyer before being chosen for flight training and earning his wings as a Naval Aviator in September 1956. He served in various naval squadrons, including service in Vietnam, before joining the Astronaut Corps. According to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, Weitz returned to the Navy after his mission on Skylab mission and retired as a captain in July 1976 after serving 22 years.

He then came out of retirement to re-join NASA. "Paul Weitz's name will always be synonymous with the space shuttle Challenger. But he also will be remembered for defying the laws of gravity - and age," said Curtis Brown, board chairman of the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation and an astronaut and veteran of six space flights. "Before it became commonplace to come out of retirement, Paul was a pioneer. He proved 51 was just a number." The foundation is supported by astronauts from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and Space Station programs and annually provides scholarships for 45 students.

Paul Weitz, space shuttle Challenger commander, dies
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Old 11-08-2017, 12:03 PM
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Apollo 12 Astronaut Richard Gordon Dies at 88...

Apollo 12 Astronaut Richard Gordon Dies
November 07, 2017 - U.S. astronaut Richard Gordon, who flew around the moon but never got a chance to walk on the surface, has died. He was 88.
Quote:
Richard "Dick'' Gordon Jr. was a test pilot chosen in NASA's third group of astronauts in 1963. He flew on Gemini 11 in 1966, walking in space twice. During the Apollo 12 mission in November 1969, Gordon circled the moon in the command module Yankee Clipper while Alan Bean and Charles Conrad landed and walked on the lunar surface. "Dick will be fondly remembered as one of our nation's boldest flyers, a man who added to our own nation's capabilities by challenging his own. He will be missed,'' acting NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot said in a statement Tuesday.


astronaut Richard Gordon Jr. Gordon, one of a dozen men who flew around the moon but didn't land there, has died

Apollo 12 marked the first moon landing to touch down in a designated spot. Gordon voiced few regrets at not having walked on the moon, anticipating another chance later in the program. He was, in fact, slated to command the Apollo 18 mission that would land on the moon, but it was cut for budget reasons.

Only 12 of 24 astronauts who went to the moon walked on the lunar surface. In a 1997 NASA oral history, Gordon said people would often ask if he felt alone while his two partners walked on the moon. "I said, 'Hell no, if you knew those guys, you'd be happy to be alone.''' Gordon died Monday at his home in California. No cause of death was given.

https://www.voanews.com/a/apollo-twe...s/4105442.html
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