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History, Geography, & Military Discuss Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events at the Political Forums; I loved this documenta ry. for years herodotus' (my personal historic hero ) papers were thought to be ramblings of ...

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Old 05-20-2017, 09:58 PM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

I loved this documentary. for years herodotus' (my personal historic hero ) papers were thought to be ramblings of an ancient conspiracy theorist.

as time passed more and more of his histories have been proven true.
( troy was once thought a myth till it was found. amazon warrior women fairy tales till finds in the tundra of fully clad elite female soldiers buried and rediscovered just as herodotus' descriptions tell us! )

Here is another where persistence and modern technology gathered to prove parts of the bible and another tale by herodotus are based in fact after all.

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Old 05-21-2017, 01:29 AM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

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Originally Posted by saltwn View Post
I loved this documentary. for years herodotus' (my personal historic hero ) papers were thought to be ramblings of an ancient conspiracy theorist.

as time passed more and more of his histories have been proven true.
( troy was once thought a myth till it was found. amazon warrior women fairy tales till finds in the tundra of fully clad elite female soldiers buried and rediscovered just as herodotus' descriptions tell us! )

Here is another where persistence and modern technology gathered to prove parts of the bible and another tale by herodotus are based in fact after all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_9lZnzK-14
More on Queen Semiramis for those who believe both the Bible and archaeology, or who are, at least, open minded.

Semiramis, Queen of Babylon
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Old 05-21-2017, 08:58 AM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

the Cities of Jericho and AI mentioned in the Bible as cities Joshua attackked were also considered "MYTHS" by many until they were found .

But soon after they were found so new faults were asserted (to claim the Bible wrong)
'OK the Bible ALL has the CITIES exactly Right BUT BUT BUT Joshua wasn't there at the "right time" so the JEWS didn't attack them. and BTW there weren't any wall like the Bible "Myths"describes.'

well just keep digging basically everything is confirmed.



Patterns of Evidence: Exodus
DVD and also on netflixs
Quote:
Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus is a thought-provoking and relevant movie! Filmmaker Timothy Mahoney takes on the hot potato of Biblical history the Exodus and matches it up against what archaeologists, historians and naysayers have to say about the Bible s accuracy. Kevin Sorbo narrates this documentary that focuses on digging for the truth (no pun intended). Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel, comments that the Bible has held the imaginations of people for thousands of years and that is a remarkable thing. Other political and religious leaders and archaeologists are featured, including Shimon Peres, former president of Israel, who says the Bible is the greatest legislator of our time. Mahoney finds that there is little archaeological evidence of the Exodus during the time of Ramesses, who most historians believe was the Pharaoh who spoke with Moses and initially refused to let God s people go. Yet when Mahoney backtracks to the Middle Kingdom, some 200 years earlier, the evidence is pretty impressive. Do the other scholars have the time frame wrong? There is controversy in the documentary for sure. Different leaders disagree with each other. Rabbi David Wolpe frankly states the Exodus didn t happen as the Bible depicts it, and archaeologist Norma Franklin from the University of Haifa doesn t believe it happened at all. Yet there are many who believe it did happen; there are also diggings that some believe prove the walls of Jericho fell, and that Rahab s quarters did not fall. There is evidence Jericho was burned as the Bible says it was. Professor Rosalie David from the University of Manchester speaks of the sudden abandonment of a people that would resemble the Hebrews and their Exodus. In one place a tablet with the name Jabin is found; he was the king that Joshua killed. The documentary features art work, several historians and archaeologists, religious leaders, and scenes featuring views of tablets and various ruins in Egypt. I just wanted to know the truth, says Mahoney, and he went to a lot of trouble trying to find it. This documentary chronicles his travels from the U.S. to Egypt, to Israel and to England. The movie finishes with Mahoney reading a rare book written by Alan Gardiner, who concludes that not enough evidence has been found to pin down certain Biblical events to definite time frames. This could support the possibility that the Middle Kingdom is the age of the Exodus, rather than the later time of Ramesses. At any rate, this film attempts to navigate the sometimes murky waters of history. We are happy to award this documentary, Patterns of Exodus: The Exodus, our Faith-Friendly Seal for all ages, although it is not intended for the very young who would have a hard time understanding it. For everyone else, it will be a fascinating look into a great moment in history and in archaeology: the exodus of Moses and the Hebrews from Egyptian bondage.
Egypt’s New Chronology w/ David Rohl
world famous historian cites evidence that supports the Biblical timing for the Exodus from Egypt and the Jews conquest of Jericho, Ai and the "cities of the plain".
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:09 AM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

The Ludlow Massacre

Ending a bitter coal-miners’ strike, Colorado militiamen attack a tent colony of strikers, killing dozens of men, women, and children.

The conflict had begun the previous September. About 11,000 miners in southern Colorado went on strike against the powerful Colorado Fuel & Iron Corporation (CF&I) to protest low pay, dangerous working conditions, and the company’s autocratic dominance over the workers’ lives. The CF&I, which was owned by the Rockefeller family and Standard Oil, responded to the strike by immediately evicting the miners and their families from company-owned shacks. With help from the United Mine Workers, the miners moved with their families to canvas tent colonies scattered around the nearby hills and continued to strike.

When the evictions failed to end the strike, the Rockefeller interests hired private detectives that attacked the tent colonies with rifles and Gatling guns. The miners fought back, and several were killed. When the tenacity of the strikers became apparent, the Rockefellers approached the governor of Colorado, who authorized the use of the National Guard. The Rockefellers agreed to pay their wages.

At first, the strikers believed that the government had sent the National Guard to protect them. They soon discovered, though, that the militia was under orders to break the strike. On this day in 1914, two companies of guardsmen attacked the largest tent colony of strikers near the town of Ludlow, home to about 1,000 men, women, and children. The attack began in the morning with a barrage of bullets fired into the tents. The miners shot back with pistols and rifles.

After a strike leader was killed while attempting to negotiate a truce, the strikers feared the attack would intensify. To stay safe from gunfire, women and children took cover in pits dug beneath the tents. At dusk, guardsmen moved down from the hills and set the tent colony on fire with torches, shooting at the families as they fled into the hills. The true carnage, however, was not discovered until the next day, when a telephone linesman discovered a pit under one of the tents filled with the burned remains of 11 children and 2 women.

Although the “Ludlow Massacre” outraged many Americans, the tragedy did little to help the beleaguered Colorado miners and their families. Additional federal troops crushed the coal-miners’ strike, and the miners failed to achieve recognition of their union or any significant improvement in their wages and working conditions. Sixty-six men, women, and children died during the strike, but not a single militiaman or private detective was charged with any crime.
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-h...udlow-colorado

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Old 09-05-2017, 01:53 AM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

George Graham Vest, a lawyer, Missouri Congressman, and US Senator.
who once represented a client in the wrongful death of a dog.

Here is his closing arguments from the trial in which damages were sought for the killing of a dog named Old Drum on October 18, 1869:


Quote:
“ Gentlemen of the jury:

The best friend a man has in this world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter that he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful.

Those who are nearest and dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name, may become traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it the most.

A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us may be the first to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads.

The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him and the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.


Gentlemen of the jury: A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness.

He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master's side.

He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer, he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounters with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince.

When all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.

If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him to guard against danger,

to fight against his enemies, and when the last scene of all comes,

and death takes the master in its embrace and his body is laid away in the cold ground,

no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by his graveside will the noble dog be found,

his head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchfulness,

faithful and true even to death.”
Vest won the case (the jury awarded $50 to the dog's owner) and also won its appeal to the Missouri Supreme Court. A statue of the dog stands in front of the Warrensburg, Missouri, courthouse and a bust of the dog resides in the Missouri Supreme Court building in Jefferson City, Missouri.
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Old 09-06-2017, 12:09 AM
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Default Re: Famous Yet Obscure Historical Events

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. wonder View Post
The Ludlow Massacre

Ending a bitter coal-miners’ strike, Colorado militiamen attack a tent colony of strikers, killing dozens of men, women, and children.

The conflict had begun the previous September. About 11,000 miners in southern Colorado went on strike against the powerful Colorado Fuel & Iron Corporation (CF&I) to protest low pay, dangerous working conditions, and the company’s autocratic dominance over the workers’ lives. The CF&I, which was owned by the Rockefeller family and Standard Oil, responded to the strike by immediately evicting the miners and their families from company-owned shacks. With help from the United Mine Workers, the miners moved with their families to canvas tent colonies scattered around the nearby hills and continued to strike.

When the evictions failed to end the strike, the Rockefeller interests hired private detectives that attacked the tent colonies with rifles and Gatling guns. The miners fought back, and several were killed. When the tenacity of the strikers became apparent, the Rockefellers approached the governor of Colorado, who authorized the use of the National Guard. The Rockefellers agreed to pay their wages.

At first, the strikers believed that the government had sent the National Guard to protect them. They soon discovered, though, that the militia was under orders to break the strike. On this day in 1914, two companies of guardsmen attacked the largest tent colony of strikers near the town of Ludlow, home to about 1,000 men, women, and children. The attack began in the morning with a barrage of bullets fired into the tents. The miners shot back with pistols and rifles.

After a strike leader was killed while attempting to negotiate a truce, the strikers feared the attack would intensify. To stay safe from gunfire, women and children took cover in pits dug beneath the tents. At dusk, guardsmen moved down from the hills and set the tent colony on fire with torches, shooting at the families as they fled into the hills. The true carnage, however, was not discovered until the next day, when a telephone linesman discovered a pit under one of the tents filled with the burned remains of 11 children and 2 women.

Although the “Ludlow Massacre” outraged many Americans, the tragedy did little to help the beleaguered Colorado miners and their families. Additional federal troops crushed the coal-miners’ strike, and the miners failed to achieve recognition of their union or any significant improvement in their wages and working conditions. Sixty-six men, women, and children died during the strike, but not a single militiaman or private detective was charged with any crime.
Militia slaughters strikers at Ludlow, Colorado - Apr 20, 1914 - HISTORY.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tpg_v5F6qSY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDd64suDz1A
, ,


A time when violence got things done, Both for the rich as well as those looking for fast money....

Dang shame this period is here again..
....
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