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History, Geography, & Military Discuss How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women at the Political Forums; UPDATE: Uncle Ferd thinks dat lady drone pilot is kinda cute... Female Marine Nears Halfway Point In Infantry Officers Course ...

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Old 08-14-2017, 08:47 AM
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Red face Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

UPDATE:

Uncle Ferd thinks dat lady drone pilot is kinda cute...

Female Marine Nears Halfway Point In Infantry Officers Course
11 Aug 2017 | A female Marine Corps lieutenant has completed roughly five weeks of the grueling 13-week Marine Corps infantry officers' course.
Quote:
A Marine Corps lieutenant is well on her way to becoming the first woman to secure the military occupational specialty of infantry officer, having completed roughly five weeks of the grueling 13-week Marine Corps infantry officers' course. The officer, whose name has not been released, began the course in early July, said Maj. Amy Punzel, a spokeswoman for Marine Corps Training and Education Command. There are approximately eight weeks left in the course, Punzel said. To date, more than 30 female Marine officers have attempted IOC, most of them as volunteers on an experimental basis before the course formally opened to women in late 2014. Very few made it past the combat endurance test, a notoriously difficult ordeal at the start of the course with a high washout rate.


Cpl. Valerie Gavaldon helps Cpl. Roxanne Cox adjust the front site post on her M16A2 service rifle, during the live-fire portion of their training at Camp Korean Village, Iraq

The most recent previous attempt was earlier this spring. In a brief with reporters this week, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn Walters mentioned the officer currently in the course, suggesting Marine Corps leadership is watching her achievements closely. "We have a female officer right now in Infantry Officers Course, and she's part of the way through, doing very well," he said. "These are successes that never seem to get out in the press."

Meanwhile, female enlisted infantrymen are already being assigned to operational infantry units in keeping with a Defense Department mandate that opened all previously closed fields to women at the start of 2016. Walters said this week that 278 women are now serving in jobs from which they'd previously been excluded, and another 40 female recruits had enlisted with contracts for these jobs. "Do we have hordes [of female Marines entering combat jobs]? No," Walters said. "But we have a pretty good nexus that are attempting to make these choices in life. And I'm very proud of them."

Female Marine Nears Halfway Point In Infantry Officers Course | Military.com
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This Enlisted Woman Is the 1st to Fly Air Force Drones
7 Aug 2017 | The Air Force has its first female enlisted Global Hawk drone pilot.
Quote:
The service said Tech. Sgt. Courtney completed its undergraduate remotely piloted aircraft training program known as the Enlisted Pilot Initial Class program, on Aug. 4. at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas. She graduated alongside three other pilots. "Tech. Sgt. Courtney doesn't do this because she's a girl. She just gets up every day and puts her uniform on and comes to work and kicks butt because that's what she does," said Maj. Natalie, an instructor pilot with Air Education and Training Command's 558th Flying Training Squadron. "That's who she is. She's not a woman pilot; she's a pilot," Natalie said in a service release. The pilots and instructors' last names were withheld given the sensitivity of their mission, the release said.


Tech. Sgt. Courtney has her remotely piloted aircraft wings pinned on by sons David and Riley during an RPA Training Course graduation Aug. 4, 2017, at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph

The Air Force has expanded its RPA reach by training enlisted airmen on the RQ-4 Global Hawk. The service announced in 2015 it would begin training enlisted airmen to operate the unarmed high-altitude reconnaissance RQ-4 drone. It is currently training pilots through the EPIC program, as well as the Initial Flight Training program. "It's great to fill that role as the first female," Courtney said. "It's awesome and humbling, but our units don't care if you're male or female, they just want you to be a good pilot."

Courtney began her intelligence career as an imagery analyst and a sensor operator for the MQ-1 Predator. Sensor operators often sit "right seat" during RPA training and also in a live, ground station scenario. "I've been sitting in the right seat for a long time, so now I'm ready to sit in the left seat," Courtney said in the release. The first three EPIC students graduated from training May 5, 2017, the release said.

This Enlisted Woman Is the 1st to Fly Air Force Drones | Military.com
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Old 09-13-2017, 07:43 PM
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Cool Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

Marine womens workin' on dey's pull-ups...

Nearly 10,000 Female Marines Opt for Pull Ups in New Fitness Test
7 Sep 2017 | Just three years after the Marine Corps acknowledged fewer than half of female recruits in boot camp couldn't complete three pull ups, some 65 percent of all female Marines voluntarily performed pull ups in their annual physical fitness test this year, officials said.
Quote:
Last year, the Corps rolled out the biggest overhaul to its PFT in 40 years, with major changes to upper-body strength requirements designed to make equal demands on female and male troops. The changes did away with the timed flexed-arm hang, which had been the standard option for female Marines, and gave all Marines the option to perform push-ups, or the more challenging pull ups. The test was, however, clearly weighted toward pull ups, with rules that made it impossible to get a perfect score without choosing that option. For women, depending on which of eight age groups they fall into, they can max their score with between three and 10 pull ups; male Marines can max out with between 18 and 23. According to new data provided to Military.com, 9,500 female Marines did pull ups in their most recent test, with Marines age in the four age groups up to age 40 averaging 7 to 8 reps.

In the three previous years, in which female Marines had an option to do pull ups instead of the flexed-arm hang but no performance incentive to do them, the percentage of female Marines choosing the option has risen steadily, said Brian McGuire, deputy force fitness branch head for the standards division of Marine Corps Training and Education Command. In 2013, just over 1,000 of all female Marines chose pull ups; in 2014, more than 1,700 chose the option; in 2015, more than 1,900 opted for pullups; and last year it was just under 2,000, or roughly 14 percent of all female Marines, McGuire said. The massive increase this year "is a marker for how this change has incentivized female Marines on the PFT," he said. "What's happening is that behaviors are changing and the benefits of upper body strength training are being realized, so this will enhance physical performance in combat-related demands as well as garrison duties."


Major Misty Posey demonstrates proper form for pull-ups to Marines at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia

McGuire said female Marines who opted for pull ups but found they could not complete the minimum single repetition, or men who could not complete the minimum average of five, were not given the chance to do pushups instead. "That was an early consideration, but as the policy is now, a Marine, male or female, declares on that event which event they want to execute," he said. In spite of that, McGuire said overall failure rates in a test that also incorporated more stringent running times for most age group were only marginally increased this year, less than 1 percent. In addition, he said, there was negligible impact on promotions as Marines rolled out the new standards.

But while the overall PFT failure rate for all Marines was 2.9 percent, some female age groups saw a significantly higher rate. According to data reviewed by Military.com, female Marines ages 21 to 25 had a 5.6 percent failure rate, the highest of any age group. Male Marines in the same age group had the second-highest failure rate, 4.9 percent. The updated upper body strength standards come shortly after all previously closed combat jobs opened to women throughout the Department of Defense in keeping with a Pentagon mandate from late 2015. The Marine Corps crafted job-specific fitness requirements for both genders that emphasized upper body strength and other key combat requirements. While a 2014 boot camp test found that half of female recruits were unable to do pull ups, the Marine Corps has since leaned in to efforts to develop the skill set, promoting a pull up training plan designed by a female officer and more recently developing a program to make professional fitness instructors available to the force.

Nearly 10,000 Female Marines Opt for Pull Ups in New Fitness Test | Military.com
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:33 PM
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Default Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

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Originally Posted by foundit66 View Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...men/?tid=sm_tw

I like how they laid out the discussion and showed the physical requirements are actually relevant to the job application.
I like that everybody is held to the same standard for the same job.

I think 6 pullups seems kind of low though. When I was in the service I could do 30 pullups in a minute no problem and almost double that for pushups.
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Old 09-21-2017, 05:15 AM
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Cool Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

1 Woman Still in Air Force SpecOps Training...

1 Woman Still in Air Force SpecOps Training: General
19 Sep 2017 | One woman is in training to become a battlefield Tactical Air Control Party specialist, Gen. Darryl Roberson said Tuesday.
Quote:
One woman remains in training to become a battlefield Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) specialist, one of several special operations jobs in the Air Force, the head of Air Education and Training Command said Tuesday. "We have one female that's in the course right now," AETC commander Gen. Darryl Roberson said during a Facebook Live interview Tuesday with Military.com. Roberson didn't identify the airman, who joined the program Aug. 14 after Basic Military Training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, according to Air Force Times.

Roberson said four other women have entered Air Force special operations training since then-Defense Secretary Ashton Carter reversed long-standing U.S. military traditions in late 2015, when he announced that all military occupational specialties would open to women. Those other trainees have left the program for various reasons, the general said. One woman who began SpecOps training in August dropped out that same month. One TACP retrainee ended up removing herself from training due to a leg injury last year; a combat rescue officer candidate passed the physical test but never completed the selection program application; and another non-prior service TACP candidate couldn't meet entry standards following BMT.

Roberson said he is hopeful more women will seek out some of the toughest jobs the service has to offer. "Come and join us!" he said during Tuesday's interview. "We can help you get through it." The general this spring introduced a new initiative, the Continuum of Learning, which aims to streamline training for airmen just beginning their Air Force careers. "We're working really hard for battlefield airmen. It's our hardest specialty area; it's our biggest attrition rate area," Roberson said. "We have to figure out better ways to train and get these airmen through the program. Several of the ways we're doing this is through the Continuum of Learning [initiative]." "We just instituted a brand-new course -- the Battlefield Airmen Prep Course, a preparatory course that once you finish BMT ... we're going to put you in this training program that is six weeks long. And it's going to prepare you to start the original course of initial entry," he said.


Airmen salute the American flag as it is lowered during the women’s retreat ceremony at Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D.

Following the prep course, airmen head to the indoctrination course, both of which are under the Battlefield Airman Training Group, also at JBSA-Lackland, Marilyn Holliday, a spokeswoman for AETC, said last month. "Both of these groups are part of the 37th Training Wing" at Lackland. Roberson said airmen must trust the process. "It's to get you ready better than we've ever done before, so when you start the [special operations training] course, your chances of success are much higher," he said. Lt. Gen. Marshall "Brad" Webb, head of Air Force Special Operations Command, said he is confident women will soon count themselves among the service's commandos. "It's going to happen, and we are ready in this command for it to happen," he said during a briefing with reporters. "It's going to be a huge non-event when it does happen."

Webb said he isn't sure when, exactly, or whether some special operations fields may see more female recruits than others. But he drew a comparison to the 1990s, when female pilots started flying service aircraft and many advanced into leadership positions. "It's maturing at a pace that you'd expect," he said. So far, six women have expressed interest in applying for special operations positions, including three for TAC-P, two for combat control officer and one for pararescue jumper (PJ), according to Command Master Sgt. Greg Smith.

Of those, two followed through, but one suffered a foot injury during initial training and another wasn't ultimately selected, Smith said. "For recruitment, it is open, it is there," he said. "Assessment, that is always our hardest part. We graduate less than 1 percent of males that go through, so you can expect probably 1 percent of females that go through will do that. We will get there. We are enthusiatsically waiting and wanting this to happen. "If you watch 'American Ninja Warrior' today, I'll tell you right now we need to go hang out there with recruitment because half of them could kick the crap out of half of us," he added, referring to the NBC series on obstacle course competitions. "Those are the ones we want in special tactics today."

1 Woman Still in Air Force SpecOps Training: General | Military.com
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Old 09-23-2017, 06:42 AM
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Cool Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

First Woman to Graduate Grueling Marine Infantry Officer Course...

First Marine Woman to Graduate Grueling Infantry Officer Course
21 Sep 2017 | The first woman Marine to pass the Infantry Officer Course will graduate Monday and be qualified to lead a platoon in combat.
Quote:
Barring any last-minute glitches, the first woman Marine to pass the grueling Infantry Officer Course will graduate Monday and be qualified to lead a rifle platoon in combat, the Marine Corps said Thursday. The lieutenant, who has not been identified, succeeded where three other women had failed in the past -- one of them twice -- and is set to join graduation ceremonies with her peers at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, the Marine Corps' Training and Education Command said.

The historic graduation was first reported by The Washington Post. "The female officer within Infantry Officer Course (IOC) has completed all graduation requirements," the command said in a statement. The 13-week course recently concluded with a three-week, live-fire exercise at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, also known as Twentynine Palms, California. "Since ground combat military occupational specialties [MOS] were opened to women in April 2016, four female Marine officers have volunteered and attempted Infantry Officer Course. The female officer in the current course will be the first female to successfully complete IOC and earn the MOS of 0302, Infantry Officer," the command said.


Marine Infantry Officer Course students await a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter fast rope drill on the Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., Auxiliary Landing Field 2

The IOC is the last hurdle to becoming a Marine platoon commander and is also the required training for ground intelligence officers. "The demanding 13-week course trains and educates newly selected infantry and ground intelligence officers in leadership, infantry skills, and character required to serve as infantry platoon commanders in the operating forces," the command said. To graduate, those entering IOC must complete six graded tactical-movement exercises, including hikes of 6.4 and 9.3 miles with loads of up to 152 pounds. About 25 percent of those who attempt the course fail to complete it. The graduation Monday will come nearly two years after the Pentagon lifted the military's last remaining restrictions for women, part of an effort to make the armed forces fully inclusive.

The Corps first opened the Infantry Officer Course to women on an experimental basis in 2012, allowing them to attempt it as part of broader research across the Defense Department examining the integration of women into all-male units. Thirty-two women tried the course before the research ended in spring 2015, and none completed it. Four additional female Marines, including the one who will graduate Monday, have attempted the course since the Pentagon opened all jobs to women in December 2015.

First Marine Woman to Graduate Grueling Infantry Officer Course | Military.com
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Old 09-23-2017, 03:59 PM
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Default Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

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Originally Posted by Bat View Post
I like that everybody is held to the same standard for the same job.

I think 6 pullups seems kind of low though. When I was in the service I could do 30 pullups in a minute no problem and almost double that for pushups.
I can't do any; never could so six seems super heroish to me
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Old 09-24-2017, 10:12 AM
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Default Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

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I can't do any; never could so six seems super heroish to me
I'm just Bat, not Batman.
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:38 PM
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Cool Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

First Female Marine AAV Officer Set to Graduate Training Oct. 3...

First Female Marine AAV Officer Set to Graduate Training
29 Sep 2017 | Days after the Marine Corps welcomed its first female infantry officer, the service is set to mark another milestone.
Quote:
A female officer enrolled in the Corps' assault amphibian officer course aboard Camp Pendleton, California is set to graduate Oct. 3, Capt. Joshua Pena, a spokesman for Marine Corps Training and Education Command, told Military.com. When she does, she'll be the first woman to earn the military occupational specialty of 1803, assault amphibian officer, qualified to be a platoon commander for Marine Corps amphibious assault vehicles, better known as AAVs or Amtracks.

Pena did not release the officer's rank or name ahead of her planned graduation. Like ground infantry jobs, jobs within armored vehicle specialties including AAVs and Light Armored Vehicles were closed to women until 2016, when all jobs across the military were declared open to both genders. To date, two female enlisted Marines have graduated AAV training, Pena said.


Marines with the 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion await orders while conducting beach operations at Camp Lejeune. The Corps will graduate its first female assault amphibian officer on Oct. 3.

The officer preparing to graduate has completed an intensive 12-week course including land water survival skills, vehicle maintenance and management, gunnery skills, amphibious operations, and offensive and defensive operations. The last four-and-and-a-half weeks of the course are spent at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center 29 Palms, California and emphasize maneuver and operations in combat. "The purpose of this course is to provide the training necessary to serve as platoon commanders of an Assault Amphibian unit," a course description posted to the Marines' official website, which still contains exclusively masculine pronouns, reads. "The course ensures the AAV platoon commander is trained to prepare his crews and AAVs for the tactical employment of troops and equipment during ship-to-shore movement and subsequent operations ashore."

The soon-to-graduate assault amphibian officer will represent the latest in a series of firsts for the Marine Corps. On Monday, the Marine Corps announced the graduation of the service's first female infantry officer following her graduation from the service's infantry officer course. In April, the service welcomed its first tank officer, 2nd Lt. Lillian Polatchek. And two female artillery officers, 2nd Lts. Katherine Boy and Virginia Brodie, have already joined the fleet after completing required job training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in June 2016.

First Female Marine AAV Officer Set to Graduate Training | Military.com
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Old 10-14-2017, 04:54 AM
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Cool Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

Granny says, "Dat's right - If at first ya don't succeed...

Female Marine Will Make Second Attempt to Become MARSOC Operator
12 Oct 2017 | A Marine who became the first woman to reach the end of Phase One in MARSOC's assessment and selection course plans to try again.
Quote:
A Marine who last year became the first woman to reach the end of Phase One in MARSOC's assessment and selection course is planning to return for a second attempt early next year. The woman, then a corporal, reached the conclusion of the 19-day course in August 2016, but did not have the minimum academic and physical training scores to move on to the secretive second phase. She is planning to reattempt Phase One in January, Maj. Nicholas Mannweiler, a spokesman for Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, told Military.com. The command declined to identify her to protect her privacy. To date, two women have attempted to join the elite ranks of MARSOC Raiders as critical skills operators since the previously closed jobs opened to women in early 2016. Both women, the corporal and a staff sergeant, came from administrative backgrounds.

Both women began assessment and selection, or A&S, in early August 2016. The staff sergeant left the course a day in after failing to meet the minimum time requirement on a ruck march. Officials said at the time that 31 men also washed out in the first week of the demanding special operations course. All Marines who attempt the first phase of A&S are given multiple opportunities to pass, Mannweiler said. Demands of the course are physical and mental. Marines are required to complete a 12-mile march carrying a pack weighing more than 45 pounds within three hours, to swi m 300 meters wearing their camouflage uniforms, and to pass classroom exercises during the 19-day phase. For Phase 2, the requirements and trials that MARSOC candidates face remain a closely guarded secret.


Marines perform pull-ups during Phase I of the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command's Assessment and Selection course aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.

The three-week phase "is a mentally and physically challenging evaluation that enables MARSOC to identify Marines that have attributes compatible with special operations missions and the MARSOC way of life," according to official informational materials. Once Marines begin Phase 2, Mannweiler said, they do not have the chance to re-attempt it. To date, no other women have identified themselves as candidates for A&S, Mannwe iler said, although recruiters continue to publicize the opportunity. "We go out and send recruiting teams to all the bases," he said. "It's gender agnostic -- here are the requirements we're looking for, here's the fitness program."

Few women in any service have attempted to enter the elite and demanding field of special operations since previously closed jobs became available. As of August, there were two women in the training pipeline to become Air Force Tactical Control Party (TAC-P) specialists; none have entered the field to date. Earlier this ye ar, Military.com broke the news that the Navy had its first female candidates for SEAL officer and Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewman, or SWCC. But the SEAL candidate for dropped out of the training pipeline in August. The Army is slightly further ahead in integrating women into special operations. The first female soldier passed qualifications to enter the 75th Ranger Regiment early this year.

Female Marine Will Make Second Attempt to Become MARSOC Operator | Military.com
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Old 10-16-2017, 04:33 PM
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Default Re: How the Marines’ new physical standards for combat jobs weed out men and women

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First Female Marine AAV Officer Set to Graduate Training Oct. 3...

First Female Marine AAV Officer Set to Graduate Training
29 Sep 2017 | Days after the Marine Corps welcomed its first female infantry officer, the service is set to mark another milestone.


Do we know for sure that she is a she? And not a man identifying as a woman.
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