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History, Geography, & Military Discuss A Silversmith's Ride... at the Political Forums; Tomorrow marks the 236th anniversary of Paul Rever's ride. Here is an excerpt of Longfellow's poem about it and a ...

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Old 04-17-2011, 07:54 PM
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Default A Silversmith's Ride...

Tomorrow marks the 236th anniversary of Paul Rever's ride. Here is an excerpt of Longfellow's poem about it and a link if you'd like to read the rest...

Quote:
Paul Revere's Ride
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, "If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,--
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm."

Then he said "Good-night!" and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,--
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.
Paul Revere's Ride

I think it's neat the way poetry or little catch phrases from long ago help us to remember certain important events in our history.
Also Paul Revere was an interesting figure to me. He was a true citizen patriot. He had a trade he was successful at, and found the time to do what it took for the revolution. Without him and many cut of the same tough fabric, we would not have the freedoms we enjoy today.
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We must inform/educate ourselves and our friends and family and we must engage in the electoral process. This is my cause. What is yours? - Annabel Park

Last edited by saltwn; 04-19-2011 at 12:15 AM.. Reason: date
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Old 04-17-2011, 08:17 PM
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Default Re: A Silversmith's Ride...

Great thread, salty! Rated 5 stars.



Mr. Revere
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Old 04-19-2011, 12:09 AM
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Default Re: A Silversmith's Ride...

His father, Apollos De Revoire (later changed to Revere), was a Huguenot refugee who had come to Boston as a child and had been apprenticed to a silversmith. This craft he taught his son Paul Revere, who became one of America’s greatest artists in silver. As a boy Revere received sufficient education to enable him later to read the difficult metallurgical books of his period. Although it was in metal that Revere did most of his work, his energy and skill (and the necessity of supporting an ever-growing family) turned him in many directions. He not only made silver articles but also crafted surgical instruments, sold spectacles, replaced missing teeth, and engraved copper plates, the most famous of which portrayed his version of the Boston Massacre.

In the 1770s Revere enthusiastically supported the patriot cause; as acknowledged leader of Boston’s mechanic class, he provided an invaluable link between artisans and intellectuals. In 1773 he donned Indian garb and joined 50 other patriots in the Boston Tea Party protest against parliamentary taxation without representation. Although many have questioned the historical liberties taken in Longfellow’s narrative poem Paul Revere’s Ride (1863), the fact is that Revere served for years as the principal rider for Boston’s Committee of Safety, making journeys to New York and Philadelphia in its service. On April 16, 1775, he rode to nearby Concord to urge the patriots to move their military stores, which were endangered by pending British troop movements. At this time he arranged to signal the patriots of the British approach by having lanterns placed in Boston’s Old North Church steeple: “One if by land, and two if by sea.” Two days later he set out from Boston on his most famous journey to alert his countrymen that British troops were on the march, particularly in search of Revolutionary leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams. Both he and his compatriot, , reached Lexington separately and were able to warn Hancock and Adams to flee. The two men together with Samuel Prescott then started for Concord, but they were soon stopped by a British patrol, and only Prescott got through. Revere was released by the British and returned on foot to Lexington. Because of Revere’s warning, the Minutemen were ready the next morning on Lexington green for the historic battle that launched the American Revolution.
With the outbreak of hostilities, Revere turned industrialist and constructed a much-needed powder mill to supply colonial arms. In 1776 he was put in command of Boston Harbour’s principal defense at Castle William, but his war record as a lieutenant colonel was largely undistinguished. He resumed his stride as a successful industrialist after the war, however, and set up a rolling mill for the manufacture of sheet copper at Canton, Mass. From this factory came sheathing for many U.S. ships, including the Constitution, and for the dome of the Massachusetts statehouse.
-Encyclopędia Britannica

(note: I edited the opening post to say 236. I don't know where I got three hundred. I don't subtract so well when I'm sleepy.)
__________________
I believe we are tricked into tolerating unjust wages, inadequate healthcare, and rising debt and poverty by a small group of very powerful people. Propaganda is the most potent and effective tool they use to achieve this objective.
We must inform/educate ourselves and our friends and family and we must engage in the electoral process. This is my cause. What is yours? - Annabel Park

Last edited by saltwn; 04-19-2011 at 12:17 AM..
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