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Health, Wellness, Sex and Body Discuss Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U.S at the General Discussion; Okaaaay. Just... well, read it for yourself. No discussion regarding the way 'food' is engineered , the increase in sugar ...

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Old 03-21-2017, 06:57 AM
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Default Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U.S

Okaaaay. Just... well, read it for yourself.

No discussion regarding the way 'food' is engineered , the increase in sugar laden foods and drinks, the 'acceptance' of overweight people, or other health and environment factors.

In addition, warm temperatures actually makes your body more sensitive to insulin, at least for Type 1.


Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U.S. - LA Times
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Old 04-16-2017, 04:47 AM
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Lightbulb Re: Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U

To develop sensors to treat diabetes...

Apple Hires Secret Team for Treating Diabetes
April 12, 2017 - Apple has hired a team of biomedical engineers as part of a secret initiative, initially envisioned by late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors to treat diabetes, CNBC reported citing three people familiar with the matter. An Apple spokeswoman declined to comment.
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The engineers are expected to work at a nondescript office in Palo Alto, California, close to the corporate headquarters, CNBC said. The news comes at the time when the line between pharmaceuticals and technology is blurring as companies are joining forces to tackle chronic diseases using high-tech devices that combine biology, software and hardware, thereby jump-starting a novel field of medicine called bioelectronics.


A woman walks past an Apple store in Beijing, China

Last year, GlaxoSmithKline and Google parent Alphabet unveiled a joint company aimed at marketing bioelectronic devices to fight illness by attaching to individual nerves.

U.S. biotech firms Setpoint Medical and EnteroMedics Inc. have already shown early benefits of bioelectronics in treating rheumatoid arthritis and suppressing appetite in the obese. Other companies playing around the idea of bioelectronics include Medtronic Plc, Proteus Digital Technology, Sanofi SA and Biogen.

CNBC: Apple Hires Secret Team for Treating Diabetes
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Old 04-16-2017, 12:33 PM
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Default Re: Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U

Would global warming cause diabetes increase in all nations, or just in the USA?
Doesn't global mean world-wide, not just the USA?
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Old 08-14-2017, 01:19 AM
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Cool Re: Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U

Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals...

Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals
Aug 14,`17 -- The email arrived in mid-June, seeking to explode any notion that global warming might turn our Arctic expedition into a summer cruise. "The most important piece of clothing to pack is good, sturdy and warm boots. There is going to be snow and ice on the deck of the icebreaker," it read. "Quality boots are key."
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The Associated Press was joining international researchers on a month-long, 10,000 kilometer (6,200-mile) journey to document the impact of climate change on the forbidding ice and frigid waters of the Far North. But once the ship entered the fabled Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and the Pacific, there would be nowhere to stop for supplies, no port to shelter in and no help for hundreds of miles if things went wrong. A change in the weather might cause the mercury to drop suddenly or push the polar pack into the Canadian Archipelago, creating a sea of rock-hard ice. So as we packed our bags, in went the heavy jackets, insulated trousers, hats, mittens, woolen sweaters and the heavy, fur-lined boots. Global warming or not, it was best to come prepared.

---

Learn more about the Arctic and read dispatches sent by a team of AP journalists as they traveled through the region's fabled Northwest Passage last month: https://www.apnews.com/tag/NewArctic

---

If parts of the planet are becoming like a furnace because of global warming, then the Arctic is best described as the world's air-conditioning unit. The frozen north plays a crucial role in cooling the rest of the planet while reflecting some of the sun's heat back into space. Yet for several decades, satellite pictures have shown a dramatic decline in Arctic sea ice that is already affecting the lives of humans and animals in the region, from Inuit communities to polar bears. Experts predict that the impact of melting sea ice will be felt across the northern hemisphere, altering ocean currents and causing freak weather as far south as Florida or France. "Things are changing in the Arctic, and that is changing things everywhere else," said David 'Duke' Snider, the seasoned mariner responsible for navigating the Finnish icebreaker MSV Nordica through the Northwest Passage last month.


Researcher Tiina Jaaskelainen points out a possible sighting of wildlife aboard the Finnish icebreaker MSV Nordica as it traverses the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Saturday, July 22, 2017. As the icebreaker entered Victoria Strait, deep inside the Northwest Passage, those onboard looked for a shadow moving in the distance or a flash of pale yellow in the expanse of white that would signal the presence of the world's largest land predator.

Researchers on the trip sought a first-hand view of the effects of global warming already seen from space. Even the dates of the journey were a clue: The ship departed Vancouver in early July and arrived in Nuuk, Greenland on July 29th, the earliest transit ever of a region that isn't usually navigable until later in the year. As it made its way through the North Pacific - passing Chinese cargo ships, Alaskan fishing boats and the occasional far-off whale - members of the expedition soaked up the sun in anticipation of freezing weeks to come. Twelve days after the ship had left Vancouver, the ice appeared out of nowhere.

At first, lone floes bobbed on the waves like mangled lumps of Styrofoam. By the time Nordica reached Point Barrow, on Alaska's northernmost tip, the sea was swarming with ice. Snider recalled that when he started guiding ships through Arctic waters more than 30 years ago, the ice pack in mid-July would have stretched 50 miles farther southwest. Back then, a ship also would have encountered much thicker, blueish ice that had survived several summer melts, becoming hard as concrete in the process, he said. He likened this year's ice to a sea of porridge with a few hard chunks - no match for the nimble 13,000-ton Nordica.

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Old 08-14-2017, 09:17 AM
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Default Re: Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U

Pure nonsensical scare tactic to make the case for AGW.

Diabetes isn't rampant in Africa, or South America. So why does a Warmer America get it?

Because of WHAT we EAT!
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