Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > General Discussion > Health, Wellness, Sex and Body
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health, Wellness, Sex and Body Discuss The VA & the OPIOID Problem at the General Discussion; Well this seems to be so real. I have spoken about this several times but not about being hooked. But ...

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 04:11 PM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,487
Thanks: 19,199
Thanked 10,921 Times in 8,518 Posts
Default The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Well this seems to be so real. I have spoken about this several times but not about being hooked.
But yes after using a sleep med/class 1 or class 2 narcotic for over 20 years and they just stopped me as with others from receiving any more without warning. I wasn't hooked like a drug addict but it messed up me sleeping properly.
Quote:
............................................. In two Parts .............................................


The VA Hooked Veterans on Opioids, Then Failed Them Again


The Wall Street Journal.

Valerie Bauerlein, Arian Campo-Flores, 1 hr ago.


FAYETTEVILLE, N.C.—Robert Deatherage, a 30-year-old Army veteran who has battled addiction to pain pills and heroin since suffering severe injuries in Afghanistan, says he reached rock bottom a year ago when he holed up in an empty church and tried to kill himself. Twice.

“I was just so sick of being as sick as I was,” he says. He put a gun in his mouth and pulled the trigger, but it didn’t fire. He says he then used two syringes to shoot all the drugs he had, but didn’t overdose.

Mr. Deatherage took the failure as a spiritual sign and walked to the nearby Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The facility didn’t have any space and turned him away, offering only a jacket from the lost and found and a phone number for a homeless veterans coordinator. After he picked up his disability check a few days later, he checked into a hotel where he knew other addicts, including veterans.
“It gets discouraging,” Mr. Deatherage says. “It makes it easier to just say, ‘F--- it, I’ll just keep doing what I’m doing."

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs acknowledges its role in creating a large population of opioid-addicted veterans by overprescribing painkillers for injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. After the agency tightened prescribing practices in 2013, many veterans bought pain pills sold illicitly on the streets. When those became too expensive, they sought heroin and fentanyl, a potent synthetic narcotic.

The VA is now struggling to undo the damage. Hampered by budgetary and bureaucratic obstacles, it has failed to build a rehabilitation program robust enough to meet the overwhelming demand for treatment from the tens of thousands of veterans with opioid addiction, say analysts who have studied the issue. That has left many veterans to fend for themselves, tapping whatever resources they can find to battle a chronic, complex—and frequently fatal—condition.

In Fayetteville, home to Fort Bragg, the largest military installation in the U.S., 47% of opioid prescriptions are abused, according to an April study by Castlight Health Inc., a health enterprise-software company. Yet the VA health system here has no residential addiction-treatment program, no inpatient opioid detoxification facility and only five doctors in a 21-county area able to dispense medications like buprenorphine, used to treat opioid abuse.

“The Fayetteville VA is one of the worst in the country,” says Justin Minyard, a retired Army first sergeant who has battled opioid addiction and testified before Congress about the issue. “There’s no help for veterans dealing with the addiction they now have.”

Elizabeth Goolsby, director of the Fayetteville VA Medical Center, says Mr. Deatherage’s “is not a typical story.” He should have been sent to the local hospital emergency room if the VA’s crisis mental health unit was full, she says.

The Fayetteville VA serves the fastest-growing veteran population in the nation, with 70,000 patients last year, up from 42,000 in 2010. It is moving quickly to meet demand, Ms. Goolsby says. It has added facilities and reduced wait times for primary care to four days, from 29 days in 2014, when an audit found the hospital had among the longest wait times of 700 VA facilities in the country.

The VA is working to increase treatment capacity nationwide and expand alternatives to the use of painkillers, such as acupuncture, says Carolyn Clancy, deputy undersecretary for health for organizational excellence at the Veterans Health Administration. The department also is aggressively addressing the supply of prescription opioids. Since 2012, the peak of opioid prescribing, the VA has reduced the number of its patients on long-term or high-dose painkillers by about a third.

“We owe it to the nation’s veterans to help them end their dependence on opioids,” said Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald in a September speech, “and break the downward spiral that all too often ends in homelessness, prison or suicide.”

More than a decade of war in Afghanistan and Iraq produced a flood of veterans with severe physical and mental conditions. Because of advances in battlefield armor and combat care, serious injuries now have 90% survival rates, compared with 40% in the Vietnam War, according to Rollin Gallagher, director of the national pain management program at the VHA. Yet many survivors are returning with permanent damage, such as amputations and spinal-cord injuries.

While many injured veterans required opioids, VA medical centers prescribed the drugs in too many cases, and often for months instead of days or weeks, department officials now say. The VA treated more than 66,000 veterans with opioid-use disorders in fiscal 2016, according to the agency.
The VA’s Mr. McDonald said veterans are 10 times as likely as the average American to abuse opioids and that such abuse is the leading factor contributing to veteran homelessness.

Military communities are magnets for veterans seeking camaraderie. In Fayetteville, the metropolitan population of 349,000 people includes 77,000 soldiers and civilians working at Fort Bragg, 63,000 active-duty family members and 98,000 veterans and their family members. Units based here, including the 82nd Airborne Division, have deployed repeatedly to the Middle East since 9/11, sending home a steady stream of severely injured soldiers.
Fayetteville has had an active drug scene for years, police say, partly because it is bisected by Interstate 95, a trafficking thoroughfare. The district attorney here says the flood of pills from the military was a key cause of the local opioid crisis, which also affects many civilians.

Air Force veteran Ken Grady, 45, says the local VA prescribed him OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin and fentanyl patches in the 2000s because of a series of surgeries for back injuries. “The VA made it so easy,” he says. “It was endless, and I abused it.”

When he couldn’t get prescriptions, Mr. Grady says he could easily obtain opioids on the street. He has been struggling to get clean, and has spent all but 65 days of the past 2-½ years in VA-funded treatment or in jail, as he is currently.
............................................. End Part One ...........................................
The VA Hooked Veterans on Opioids, Then Failed Them Again
__________________


Improvise - Adapt - Over Come...
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to mlurp For This Useful Post:
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 04:16 PM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,487
Thanks: 19,199
Thanked 10,921 Times in 8,518 Posts
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Quote:
............................ ..................Part two .................................................

During one stay at the VA’s crisis mental health unit, a doctor in another section prescribed him Percocet for his chronic back pain, he says. “Please don’t give me that,” he says he told the doctor. Mr. Grady says he has sometimes bought drugs from veterans selling just-filled narcotic prescriptions outside VA facilities.

Last month, Mr. Grady had several teeth pulled by a VA contractor, who prescribed him Vicodin for the pain. Mr. Grady says he protested, but “you don’t have to twist my arm too much.” He relapsed, bought more pills on the street and landed back in jail. He hoped to be out by Christmas but his mother says it is taking longer than expected to find treatment and a place to stay.

Ms. Goolsby, director of the Fayetteville center, says VA facilities are sprawling public places, and it would be regrettable but not unheard of for veterans to sell pills on campus. She also says the VA has improved its record-keeping to better track prescriptions for veterans with substance-use disorder.

The VA system’s treatment options are limited. The Fayetteville VA has an outpatient alcohol detox unit but no opioid detox unit. It refers veterans to other local facilities for detox, the initial period of up to about a week when an addict comes off drugs, endures withdrawal and is stabilized. The VA then refers them to its outpatient substance-abuse treatment program, the much longer process of overcoming addiction and underlying issues through therapy, group programs and medication. The outpatient program has 1,000 visits a month, and saw a total of 2,800 new patients from January to October of this year.

Addicted veterans can be referred to one of the VA’s 43 inpatient rehab centers around the country, which combined have 906 beds, according to a 2014 VA audit. Waits are usually longer than 30 days, though, which deters referrals, and beds often stay empty because of lack of staffing, the audit said.

The nearest inpatient VA facility to Fayetteville is in Salisbury, N.C., nearly three hours away.

Given the scarcity of VA services, addicted veterans often turn to public and private providers, which typically are also overwhelmed by demand. Cape Fear Valley Health System has a contract to provide mental-health services for the county, and has 16 detox beds, which stay full.

Cape Fear, a not-for-profit hospital system overseen by county commissioners and other local leaders, has no residential treatment. It sees about 8,000 outpatient cases a year involving opioid abuse and employs only three doctors who can provide medication like buprenorphine to treat addiction. They are limited to seeing a combined 160 patients, and have a month-long waiting list, according to Cape Fear.

Users seeking methadone or other medication to treat their addiction mainly rely on a handful of private clinics. The largest is the Carolina Treatment Center, in an office park behind the hospital. The clinic dispenses medication to 600 patients each day, with lines forming before the clinic opens at 5 a.m.
Alan Shay Davis, a moonlighting obstetrician, started filling in as the medical director three years ago after a loved one became addicted to opioids. His clients range from veterans and active-duty soldiers to stay-at-home mothers and blue-collar workers. “I’ve been a part of the problem for some patients,” he says, by prescribing opioids in his obstetric practice. “Hopefully now I’m part of the solution.”

One of Dr. Davis’s patients at the clinic is Mr. Deatherage, who is taking Vivitrol, a long-acting drug that attaches to receptors in the body and blocks the effects of opioids.

Mr. Deatherage was the youngest of five children raised by a single mother in Tecumseh, Okla. He idolized his grandfather, an Army helicopter pilot in Vietnam who died of cancer when Mr. Deatherage was 10. Mr. Deatherage says he was determined to join the military: “I thought, ‘I want to become somebody. I want to make a big impact in the world.’ ”

Shortly after enlisting in 2006, Mr. Deatherage was prescribed Percocet for a back injury from paratrooper training. He says he took pills during most of his deployment in Afghanistan in 2009 and 2010. His armored vehicle was bombed repeatedly while clearing roads in remote areas. He suffered back, neck, facial and shoulder injuries, and cracked his skull in an explosion that he later learned caused a traumatic brain injury.
“I got blown up seven times,” he says. “I would go see my medic, get bandaged, get Percs and get on with it.”

Back home, he was prescribed opioids for his injuries while stationed on the West Coast and in Hawaii. As his tolerance increased, he started buying pills from other soldiers. He lost his marriage, his savings and his job, and was medically discharged for substance use in February 2014.

“They threw me out there and said, ‘Take care of yourself,’ ” he says. “So I did.”

Mr. Deatherage says he sought substance-abuse treatment from the VA over the years, including the spring of 2014 when he says he was told there was a four-month wait for residential treatment. The VA continued to prescribe opioids for his injuries.

He overdosed six times, once at his mother’s house in Oklahoma. She has trained as an emergency medical technician and revived him. “That’s how my family found out,” he says. “They thought I was just depressed.”

His mother, Louise Johnson, 54, says her son had been fooling no one since he came home with a blank stare and a gallon-sized Ziploc bag full of VA prescriptions.

Mr. Deatherage would call home during his 18 months in Afghanistan and tell her horror stories, like cleaning up after a bomb severed his buddy’s leg and fatally shooting a civilian whom he feared was carrying a bomb. “The things that he saw and the things that he did hurt him deep,” she says. “As time went by and I saw the destruction the medication was doing, I knew why.”
She says she was close to finding a VA facility for him to check into when he left town.

Mr. Deatherage says he bounced around Texas awhile before heading to his brother’s house west of Fayetteville in early 2015. By then he could no longer get pills from the VA because of tighter prescribing policies. He got kicked out of his brother’s house after stealing his nephew’s prescription cough syrup and replacing it with Robitussin. He started using heroin, which was cheap and plentiful.

Mr. Deatherage was arrested for theft and other charges, and spent stretches of the past two years homeless or in jail. He was referred earlier this year to one of two area veterans treatment courts, which allow low-level offenders to avoid prison by completing programs that address their underlying conditions.

In court this fall, Mr. Deatherage, looking thin and disheveled, told the judge he was sleeping in his car and spending half of his $3,000 monthly disability check on child support for his two sons, and the other half on heroin. Court staff arranged for him to start medication at Carolina Treatment Center, and to stay at a local halfway house that has a federal contract to serve up to 18 homeless veterans at a time.

There, he made friends with another veteran in the court program, Reggie Scott. In an interview in the fall, Mr. Scott said he was grateful for the VA’s help connecting him to treatment. “I’d be dead without them,” he said. But he still felt unmoored and prone to relapse.

In October, Mr. Deatherage and Mr. Scott used heroin together, and both went to jail under the terms of the court program.

Mr. Scott got out in October and kept using. He overdosed on heroin on Dec. 9 and went back to jail. He says he’s going to drop out of the veterans treatment program and serve his original sentence.

In court last week, Mr. Scott shuffled out of a holding cell in shackles to address other addicted veterans, his father and his mother, who was crying in the front row. “I want to give up. I’m done,” Mr. Scott said. “I don’t know if I’ll ever quit using drugs. But I do love y’all, I do.”
“Love you, Reggie!” several veterans said.

Mr. Deatherage was in the courtroom. He got out of jail in November and has been sober more than two months. He starts a 10-week training program in January to be a foreman at a natural-gas company.
He is optimistic that he will finally get clean. “I can’t worry about Reggie,” he says. “I’ve got to focus on me."

Write to Valerie Bauerlein at valerie.bauerlein@wsj.com and Arian Campo-Flores at arian.campo-flores@wsj.com
The VA Hooked Veterans on Opioids, Then Failed Them Again
__________________


Improvise - Adapt - Over Come...
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mlurp For This Useful Post:
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 04:31 PM
saltwn's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Esto perpetua
Posts: 81,008
Thanks: 55,344
Thanked 26,230 Times in 18,767 Posts
Send a message via AIM to saltwn Send a message via MSN to saltwn Send a message via Yahoo to saltwn
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

well they probably aren't going to get any pretty soon and may go w/o care period as doni tiny hands is in favor of privatizing the VA he announced today
And we alreafy know where the new congress stands on that
__________________
Trump’s only true skill is the con; his only fundamental belief is that the United States is the birthright of straight, white, Christian men, and his only real, authentic pleasure is in cruelty. It is that cruelty, and the delight it brings them, that binds his most ardent supporters to him, in shared scorn for those they hate and fear: immigrants, black voters, feminists, and treasonous white men who empathize with any of those who would steal their birthright.~Serwer|The Atlantic
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to saltwn For This Useful Post:
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-29-2016, 09:29 PM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,487
Thanks: 19,199
Thanked 10,921 Times in 8,518 Posts
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by saltwn View Post
well they probably aren't going to get any pretty soon and may go w/o care period as doni tiny hands is in favor of privatizing the VA he announced today
And we alreafy know where the new congress stands on that
salty your getting harder and harder to understand... Do you know of any news or have a link?

Who announced what? All I know about the Congress is they can't work well with the other party. And both parties suck.

I speak English plain and simple...
__________________


Improvise - Adapt - Over Come...
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mlurp For This Useful Post:
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-24-2017, 07:28 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Exclamation Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Granny says keep yer pain pills where kids can't get to `em...

Some of Youngest Opioid Victims are Curious Toddlers
March 23, 2017 — Curious toddlers find the drugs in a mother's purse or accidentally dropped on the floor. Sometimes a parent fails to secure the child-resistant cap on a bottle of painkillers.
Quote:
No matter how it happens, if a 35-pound toddler grabs just one opioid pill, chews it and releases the full concentration of a time-released adult drug into their small bodies, death can come swiftly. These are some of the youngest victims of the nation's opioid epidemic — children under age 5 who die after swallowing opioids. The number of children's deaths is still small relative to the overall toll from opioids, but toddler fatalities have climbed steadily over the last 10 years.

In 2000, 14 children in the U.S. under age 5 died after ingesting opioids. By 2015, that number climbed to 51, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, alone, four children died last year of accidental overdoses. Another 2-year-old perished in January. Each family who loses a toddler to opioids confronts a death that probably could have been prevented. Here are a few of their stories:

An energetic birthday girl, a methadone mystery

Cataleya Tamekia-Damiah Wimberly couldn't sit still. She spent most of her first birthday party in Milwaukee dancing and diving into the cake. But her first birthday party was also her last. Nearly three weeks later, she was found dead of a cause her mother never suspected — a methadone overdose. Helen Jackson, 24, was styling her older daughter's hair when she got a call from Cataleya's father, who shared custody of the little girl. He sobbed on the phone as he explained how he found their daughter unresponsive the morning of Feb. 16, 2016. "I screamed so hard and so loud," Jackson said. "The screams that came out of me took all my strength, all my wind. It was just terrible."


OxyContin pills, an opioid drug, are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont, Feb. 19, 2013. Americans, even though comprising only five percent of the world's population, consume eighty percent of the its supply of pain medication

Police were puzzled. They looked into whether the toddler was smothered while co-sleeping with her father and his girlfriend. They also investigated carbon monoxide poisoning because of a gas smell. Toxicology tests eventually revealed the methadone in her system. Jackson said her daughter, while in the care of her father, was at a relative's house when she swallowed the methadone that took her life.

Police are still investigating how Cataleya got the methadone. The case could be referred to the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office for consideration of criminal charges, said Sgt. Timothy Gauerke. Since Cataleya's death, friends and family have commented on what they perceive as Jackson's strength in dealing with her loss. In reality, she said, she feels fragile and weak. "I don't know when I'm going to fall apart," she said. "I don't know when I'm going to explode. It's all still in there."

Mother's prescription proves fatal for daughter
See also:

State Department: US in Worst Heroin, Opioids Crisis in 60 Years
March 02, 2017 — The United States has its worst heroin and opioid crisis in more than 60 years. In 2015, mostly due to the heroin and opioid painkiller epidemic, more than 52,000 deaths in the U.S. were related to drug overdoses, the highest number in U.S. history, according to the State Department's International Narcotics Control Strategy Report released Thursday.
Quote:
Ambassador William Brownfield briefed reporters on the release. The Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs said that the incredible demand is domestic, but that 100 percent of all heroin, and the great majority of all synthetic drugs that are used and abused in the United States, come from other countries. He estimates that between 90 and 94 percent of all heroin consumed in the U.S. comes from Mexico and that as little as 2-4 percent of it comes from Colombia. The remainder, around 4-6 percent, comes from Asia, mainly from Afghanistan. The U.S. has more communities, more families, more regions and towns confronting an explosive drug addiction problem related to heroin, opioids and to fentanyl and other synthetic drugs now than in the immediate post World War II era.


This undated photo provided by the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner’s Office shows fentanyl pills.

Brownfield said the potent and wildly addictive drug fentanyl is mostly coming in its raw form from China. He said it processes through Mexico, where it enters into that trafficking stream and moves north into the United States and Canada. "And it then becomes an exceptionally dangerous product in the United States," said Brownfield, "because fentanyl is 10-50 times as potent as heroin, and when the user does not realize that he or she is consuming fentanyl and not consuming heroin, the likelihood of overdose and death is extremely increased.” Brownfield had high praise for China for working with the United States to control fentanyl and 130 new synthetic drugs, saying this is saving lives in the U.S. He said cooperation between the U.S. and China has improved “astronomically” during the past four years. He was asked about whether President Donald Trump’s plan to build a wall along the U.S. southern border with Mexico would help stop the flow of heroin and other drugs.


A bag of 4-fluoro isobutyryl fentanyl which was seized in a drug raid is displayed at the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Testing and Research Laboratory in Sterling, Virginia

Brownfield said the U.S. and Mexico have developed a law enforcement “cooperative wall” at this point without having the physical construction of a wall. But he said since the president has been clear on his intentions to build a wall, the State Department will integrate any new realities into their efforts to curb drug trafficking across the U.S.-Mexico border. Brownfield said the State Department has determined for more than 20 years that the U.S. and Mexico share responsibility for the drug problem, and that it requires shared solutions. He added that though the U.S. drug epidemic is unprecedented, the United States is also much better positioned with the mechanisms and international cooperation it has in place today to confront the crisis than it would have been 20 years ago.

http://www.voanews.com/a/us-in-worst...s/3747278.html

Last edited by waltky; 03-24-2017 at 07:38 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-25-2017, 11:46 AM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,487
Thanks: 19,199
Thanked 10,921 Times in 8,518 Posts
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

What is all this government about. The reason I ask this is simple. This govt., is in fact the reason so much relating to gangs and drugs and these Pill Mill Doctors who prescribe to much to the wrong people who come in the office, has gotten out of hand.

The Feds policy of, "well it is a state problem." When they, the govt., has labeled a few of these gang as International Gangs, some what like with the Terrorist groups.

I would point out it is the federal govt., main duty to protect it's citizens, not pass the buck to each state.

And this would apply to patients and doctors who issue/receive said
OPIOID'S.
Yet as usual the Democrats (Progressives in this case) don't consider that in this opioid problem there are some situations that shouldn't be changed from the doctors in charge.

Take the VA as a case in point. My doctor (before he had an accident and is now on bed rest) told me as he had no choice but to remove a medication form my use. That he has several patients in terrible pain with cancer who will die in a short span.
Which because of this new policy of removing or reducing opioid's that a patient receives, means they will die with more pain.

A flat out new policy isn't the correct answer to a problem that will continue no matter what.

That is part of the reason for this worst case heroin and opioid crisis in 60 years.
As a patient is removed from any of the standard opioids that they might have been issued they now look to the streets, and the local dealers of Mexico Heroin..
The damn Federal Government is the driving force behind this overdose problem.
Instead of dealing with the actual cause of the problem ie, bad Pill Mill Doctors (which by the way are not to hard to locate, as each one has a drug license number tied to the prescription pad) And those whom bring in this Black Tar Heroin and those who sell it on the streets. many who are in Gangs.

By removing both of these and informing patients who do receive any opioids
on the proper storage as well as use, this problem would end.

I do hope somehow this advise would reach the fools in office who are not so as I have sent this idea to them a while back and nothing. Except the dumb get dumber
__________________


Improvise - Adapt - Over Come...
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-25-2017, 07:21 PM
saltwn's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Esto perpetua
Posts: 81,008
Thanks: 55,344
Thanked 26,230 Times in 18,767 Posts
Send a message via AIM to saltwn Send a message via MSN to saltwn Send a message via Yahoo to saltwn
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlurp View Post
salty your getting harder and harder to understand... Do you know of any news or have a link?

Who announced what? All I know about the Congress is they can't work well with the other party. And both parties suck.

I speak English plain and simple...
just two but look at more opinions as there are plenty

Trump considering plans for privatizing VA medical options

Vets Groups to Trump Team: Don't Privatize VA | Military.com
__________________
Trump’s only true skill is the con; his only fundamental belief is that the United States is the birthright of straight, white, Christian men, and his only real, authentic pleasure is in cruelty. It is that cruelty, and the delight it brings them, that binds his most ardent supporters to him, in shared scorn for those they hate and fear: immigrants, black voters, feminists, and treasonous white men who empathize with any of those who would steal their birthright.~Serwer|The Atlantic
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to saltwn For This Useful Post:
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-26-2017, 01:52 AM
mlurp's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Flatlands
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,487
Thanks: 19,199
Thanked 10,921 Times in 8,518 Posts
Default Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by saltwn View Post

Unreal as it might sound I agree with our veterans groups and would ask Trump to not screw up the VA Admin., any more than it is already messed up.

All that needs to be done is remove these bad administrators and the few major **** ups calling themselves doctors.
And apply any newer regs., with an open mind after plenty of review which should also include these Veterans Groups comments as they have the Veterans interest at heart unlike any others..

P.S. I do thank you for the extra time you spent making your remarks understandable...
__________________


Improvise - Adapt - Over Come...
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to mlurp For This Useful Post:
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-18-2017, 09:48 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Question Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Pentagon's mental illness 'Bad Paper' discharges...

Pentagon Issued 'Bad Paper' Discharges to Troops with Mental Illnesses
17 May 2017 | WASHINGTON -- More than 13,000 service members separated from the military for misconduct in recent years suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury or another disorder and were prevented from receiving treatment from the Department of Veterans Affairs because of their discharge status.
Quote:
The Government Accountability Office released a report Tuesday detailing the thousands of possibly improper discharges the Defense Department issued from 2011 through 2015. The report states the Defense Department is inconsistent and doesn't always follow its own policies to take into consideration that a service-related medical disorder could have led to a service member's misconduct. The report particularly focuses on PTSD and TBI, signature wounds of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars that the GAO report stated can change service members' moods and behaviors and lead to disciplinary problems. "Really, it's providing us with definitive proof to support what we've been saying for years: that the vast majority of veterans with bad paper are those who have been afflicted by PTSD, TBI and other conditions," said Kris Goldsmith, with Vietnam Veterans for America, who has been advocating for years for the Defense Department to change their discharge procedures. "DOD has been treating veterans like they're disposable."

During the four-year span, the Defense Department separated 91,764 service members for misconduct, and 57,141 -- or 62 percent -- were diagnosed with PTSD, TBI or other conditions such as adjustment, anxiety, bipolar or substance abuse disorders within two years before leaving the service. About 35 percent of service members had adjustment disorders, which are psychological responses to stressful events. Eleven percent had TBI and 8 percent were diagnosed with PTSD. Most of the service members were given a "general" discharge, making them ineligible for some VA services. But 13,283 were given the more stringent "other-than-honorable" discharge, which disqualifies them from receiving VA health care. The GAO report found the Navy and Air Force didn't have a policy to medically screen service members for PTSD and TBI before they're separated for misconduct.


U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Freddy Toruno, positions a service member for a CT scan at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan’s Craig Joint Theater Hospital

Included in the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act was a measure titled the "Fairness for Veterans Act" that requires Defense Department panels that review discharges to consider medical evidence from a veteran's health care provider. Panels are supposed to review each case presuming PTSD, TBI or another condition led to the discharge. The office also found that in cases where service members facing disciplinary action chose separation rather than go through a trial by court-martial, the Army and Marine Corps might not have told servicemembers that the decision meant they were ineligible for VA services. Army officials also might not be following a policy to train officers to identify symptoms of TBI in service members, the report states. Inconsistencies and unfollowed policies have led to increased risk that service members are being "inappropriately" separated from the military, the GAO wrote.

The Defense Department agreed with most of the GAO's recommendations to fix the issues. However, the department disputed some of the data included in the report, including a finding that 16 percent of separated service members suffered from PTSD or TBI. The Defense Department argued GAO double counted, and GAO maintained it didn't. The Defense Department also had concerns the GAO included adjustment and depression in its list of conditions that could have caused misconduct and led to service members' separation. The Defense Department said there was no clinical evidence to back that up, but the GAO said they came up with the list by talking with Defense Department and mental health professionals about conditions that could be caused or exacerbated by military service.

Tuesday's report prompted Vietnam Veterans of America to renew their plea to President Donald Trump to establish a program to upgrade "bad paper" discharges for post-9/11 veterans who suffered from mental health conditions. The group first asked Trump in December to pardon the veterans. Advocates estimate about 22,000 veterans with mental illnesses have received other-than-honorable discharges since 2009. "These are veterans who volunteered to serve in a time of war, yet they've been failed by previous administrations," VVA National President John Rowan said Tuesday in a statement. "Our current commander-in-chief can't hesitate now. President Trump has always supported our veterans, and we are confident that he will listen to our plea."

Pentagon Issued 'Bad Paper' Discharges to Troops with Mental Illnesses | Military.com
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2017, 06:32 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Angry Re: The VA & the OPIOID Problem

Expose' was on 60 Minutes last night...

Trump drug czar nominee accused of hindering opioid crackdown
Mon, 16 Oct 2017 - The lawmaker whose state is ravaged by painkiller abuse is accused of being a drug industry stooge.
Quote:
US President Donald Trump's nominee for drug czar is accused of helping relax enforcement on pharmaceutical firms blamed for fuelling the opioid crisis. Pennsylvania congressman Tom Marino pushed a bill that reportedly stripped a government agency of the ability to freeze suspicious painkiller shipments. His co-sponsor on the act was Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee. Both their states have been ravaged by opioids. Experts estimate the drugs could kill 500,000 Americans in the next decade.


Mr Marino has not responded to requests for comment on the report

Deadly addiction to opioids - a class of drug covering everything from legal painkillers to heroin - has been described as America's biggest public health crisis since the spread of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. President Trump was pressed on Monday about the allegations surrounding his drug czar nominee that were detailed in an expose by the Washington Post and CBS News' 60 Minutes programme.

During a press conference at the White House, Mr Trump told reporters he took the journalistic investigation "very seriously". "We're gonna be looking into Tom [Marino]," he told reporters from the Rose Garden. "He's a great guy. I did see the report. We're gonna look into the report." Mr Trump also said he would formally declare a national opioid emergency next week, as he pledged to do more than two months ago. Mr Marino and Ms Blackburn, both Republicans, helped force out an official at the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) who was taking on the drug firms, report the Post and 60 Minutes.


Marsha Blackburn (L) and Tom Marino co-authored "industry-friendly" legislation, according to the investigation

According to the investigation, they also introduced and lobbied for an "industry-friendly" bill called the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act. A DEA whistleblower said the legislation made it harder for the agency to prevent distributors from shipping pills to rogue pharmacies and corrupt doctors around the US. The so-called suspension orders - which the DEA slaps on suspicious shipments - have not been issued for at least two years, according to the report.

A murky mess
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to waltky For This Useful Post:
Reply

Tags
and, opioid, problem, the

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0