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Health, Wellness, Sex and Body Discuss Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly at the General Discussion; If true, we are going to have a lot of absent-minded people in this country considering the obesity rate. Americans ...

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Old 02-20-2012, 09:29 AM
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Default Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

If true, we are going to have a lot of absent-minded people in this country considering the obesity rate.

Americans sure love their food. It has become an epidemic here.

Quote:
A link between memory loss and a high calorie diet has been suggested by researchers in the US.

They were investigating mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which can be an early sign of dementia.

Research, presented at a conference, claimed a high calorie diet was linked to having twice the risk of MCI, compared with a low calorie diet.

Alzheimer's Research UK said a healthy lifestyle was known to help protect against dementia.

Mild cognitive impairment has become increasingly interesting to researchers as it may help predict who will go on to develop dementia, such as Alzheimer's.

A team at the Mayo Clinic in the US has investigated the effect of diet in 1,233 people aged between 70 and 89. None had dementia, but 163 were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment.

Doubling

The patients were divided into low calorie intake (600 to 1,526 calories a day), middle (1,526 to 2,142.5) and high (2,142.5 to 6,000) and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment was compared.

The results were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology. They showed no difference in the low and middle groups, however, the high intake group had more than double the incidence of MCI.

Researcher Dr Yonas Geda said: "We observed a dose-response pattern which simply means; the higher the amount of calories consumed each day, the higher the risk of MCI."

The study cannot say that a high calorie diet causes MCI, people who are cognitively impaired could end up eating more food or there could be another factor involved which increases the risk of both.

It has also not yet been published in a peer-reviewed academic journal.

But Dr Geda did suggest there was potential for therapy: "Cutting calories and eating foods that make up a healthy diet may be a simpler way to prevent memory loss as we age."

Dr Marie Janson, from Alzheimer's Research UK, said the findings were interesting, and fitted in with "the bigger picture of a healthy lifestyle preventing Alzheimer's in later life".

She said it was "difficult" to work out what a mechanism linking calories and cognitive impairment would be.

But she added: "We know that age is one of the greatest risk factors for dementia, but adopting a healthy lifestyle including a balanced diet and regular exercise, is beneficial in protecting against dementia along with a number of other chronic diseases."
BBC News - Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

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Old 04-07-2017, 07:50 PM
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Lightbulb Re: Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

Everything you know about memory may be wrong...

Rules of memory 'beautifully' rewritten
Fri, 07 Apr 2017 - What really happens when we make and store memories has been unravelled in a discovery that surprised even the scientists who made it.
Quote:
The US and Japanese team found that the brain "doubles up" by simultaneously making two memories of events. One is for the here-and-now and the other for a lifetime, they found. It had been thought that all memories start as a short-term memory and are then slowly converted into a long-term one. Experts said the findings were surprising, but also beautiful and convincing.

'Significant advance'

Two parts of the brain are heavily involved in remembering our personal experiences. The hippocampus is the place for short-term memories while the cortex is home to long-term memories. This idea became famous after the case of Henry Molaison in the 1950s. His hippocampus was damaged during epilepsy surgery and he was no longer able to make new memories, but his ones from before the operation were still there. So the prevailing idea was that memories are formed in the hippocampus and then moved to the cortex where they are "banked". The team at the Riken-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics have done something mind-bogglingly advanced to show this is not the case.


The human brain is a biological masterpiece

The experiments had to be performed on mice, but are thought to apply to human brains too. They involved watching specific memories form as a cluster of connected brain cells in reaction to a shock. Researchers then used light beamed into the brain to control the activity of individual neurons - they could literally switch memories on or off. The results, published in the journal Science, showed that memories were formed simultaneously in the hippocampus and the cortex. Prof Susumu Tonegawa, the director of the research centre, said: "This was surprising."


The experiments were performed on mice but are thought to apply to human brains too

He told the BBC News website: "This is contrary to the popular hypothesis that has been held for decades. "This is a significant advance compared to previous knowledge, it's a big shift." The mice do not seem to use the cortex's long-term memory in the first few days after it is formed. They forgot the shock event when scientists turned off the short-term memory in the hippocampus. However, they could then make the mice remember by manually switching the long-term memory on (so it was definitely there). "It is immature or silent for the first several days after formation," Prof Tonegawa said.

'Strong case'
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Old 04-07-2017, 08:06 PM
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Default Re: Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

Holy archive Batman......
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Old 04-07-2017, 08:47 PM
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Default Re: Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

I'm really getting tired of the mice getting all the tests to extrapolate human results.
Test on humans already.
Get real results that actually apply to humans. By testing on humans.
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Old 04-08-2017, 08:31 PM
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Default Re: Big meals in 'memory loss link' in elderly

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bat View Post
I'm really getting tired of the mice getting all the tests to extrapolate human results.
Test on humans already.
Get real results that actually apply to humans. By testing on humans.
I think we tried that in Tuscaloosa.

side note/ I had forgotten how prolific Hairy's science posts were back in the day.
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