Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > General Discussion > Health, Wellness, Sex and Body
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health, Wellness, Sex and Body Discuss Diabetes research & treatment at the General Discussion; Preventable diabetes deaths... 24,000 diabetes deaths a year 'could be avoided' 14 December 2011 - Insulin injections can control the ...

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 05:54 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Lightbulb Diabetes research & treatment

Preventable diabetes deaths...

24,000 diabetes deaths a year 'could be avoided'
14 December 2011 - Insulin injections can control the condition
Quote:
Up to 24,000 deaths from diabetes could be avoided in England each year, if patients and doctors better managed the condition, a report concludes. The first-ever audit of patient deaths from the condition said basic health checks, a good diet and regular medication could prevent most of them. Diabetes UK said it was vital the 2.3 million sufferers had top quality care. The Department of Health in England said shocking variations in care and an unacceptable death toll were evident. About a third of people in the UK affected do not realise they have the condition. It means their bodies cannot use glucose properly. If they do not manage it, they can develop potentially fatal complications like heart or kidney failure. The report, by the NHS Information Centre, compared information about people with diabetes in England with data from death records. Around 70-75,000 diabetic patients die every year.

The study estimated that a third of them were dying from causes that could be avoided if their condition were better managed. That includes basic health checks from doctors, and patients taking medication and keeping to a healthy diet. For patients with Type 1, the risk of dying was 2.6 times higher than it was for the general population. With Type 2, the risk was 1.6 times higher. But in younger age groups, the risk was far greater. Women between the ages of 15 and 34 with diabetes were nine times more likely to die than other women of the same age. Men in the same age group were four times more likely to die if they had the condition. It is the first time there has been such a comprehensive assessment of the number of affected people dying. The National Diabetes Information Service said the number of people with the condition was rising, so if nothing was done, the number of deaths would also increase.

'Shocking' variations

"Many of these deaths could be prevented," said Dr Bob Young, diabetologist and spokesman for the National Diabetes Information Service. "Doctors, nurses and the NHS working in partnership with people who have diabetes should be able to improve these grim statistics." Diabetes UK described the figures as alarming. "We know that half of people with Type 2 and more than two thirds of people with Type 1 diabetes are not receiving the care they need to stay healthy," said Barbara Young, Diabetes UK chief executive.

"It is imperative we take action now to stop even more lives being needlessly cut short. "We will be holding the NHS to account wherever it fails to deliver high-quality care." The Department of Health in England said the audit had revealed shocking variations in care, and an unacceptable death toll. Care services Minister Paul Burstow said: "I expect the NHS to learn from the best. It's not rocket science - integrated health care can help people manage their diabetes, and stay well and out of hospital."

BBC News - 24,000 diabetes deaths a year 'could be avoided'
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to waltky For This Useful Post:
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 08:49 AM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,009
Thanks: 11,117
Thanked 9,252 Times in 5,734 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Education is the key to it all, not more rules and regs, as the US goverment is want to do.

As to the Type 1's, the LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults) form is growing at an alarming rate, and is definitely harder to diagnose, or is frequently misdiagnosed.

There is no 'cure' for either type, just onset delay and control.
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GottaGo For This Useful Post:
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 12:01 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 890
Thanks: 2,533
Thanked 1,116 Times in 541 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaGo View Post
Education is the key to it all, not more rules and regs, as the US goverment is want to do.

As to the Type 1's, the LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults) form is growing at an alarming rate, and is definitely harder to diagnose, or is frequently misdiagnosed.

There is no 'cure' for either type, just onset delay and control.
Adult onset type 1 is what my mom had, and it can be very hard to control. She lived a long and relatively healthy life even though she had the "brittle" form of the disease.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to skrekk For This Useful Post:
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 12:07 PM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,009
Thanks: 11,117
Thanked 9,252 Times in 5,734 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Adult onset type 1 is what my mom had, and it can be very hard to control. She lived a long and relatively healthy life even though she had the "brittle" form of the disease.
I am Type 1 LADA, diagnosed 5 years ago, blindsided. I have fortunately been very stable, once under control, but that doesn't mean I don't have my literal ups and downs.

Life's an adventure.
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 12:18 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 890
Thanks: 2,533
Thanked 1,116 Times in 541 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by GottaGo View Post
I am Type 1 LADA, diagnosed 5 years ago, blindsided. I have fortunately been very stable, once under control, but that doesn't mean I don't have my literal ups and downs.

Life's an adventure.
Good luck - my mom controlled hers very well (onset at menopause) and didn't have any direct complications of the disease (although probably lots of indirect issues). But she did have a number of hypoglycemic incidents where she was found unconscious with a count under 20, so from that standpoint she was lucky to have survived. A fall while ballroom dancing at 85 is ultimately what did her in.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 12:25 PM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,009
Thanks: 11,117
Thanked 9,252 Times in 5,734 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Good luck - my mom controlled hers very well (onset at menopause) and didn't have any direct complications of the disease (although probably lots of indirect issues). But she did have a number of hypoglycemic incidents where she was found unconscious with a count under 20, so from that standpoint she was lucky to have survived. A fall while ballroom dancing at 85 is ultimately what did her in.
Thank you.

I've had minor complications, and hope it stays that way. Never been that low yet, and again, hope it stays that way.

If you'll pardon my smile, I'd like to leave this earth dancing too.
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GottaGo For This Useful Post:
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 02:04 PM
1069's Avatar
Bookworm.
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5,073
Thanks: 4,721
Thanked 4,834 Times in 2,602 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

My dad has Type 2, diagnosed in his mid-50s (he's in his late 50s now).
It was very unexpected, as he is not overweight and has been quite active for most of his life. We figure it must be hereditary (his parents died young, and there aren't any other older family members still living, so it's hard to know what to expect as we get older).
He has had a hell of a time keeping his diabetes under control. I know it affects his moods/emotional state a lot, and I am assuming it affects his physical well being also.
I was borderline gestational diabetic with this last pregnancy, so I guess I'll probably have Type 2 diabetes too, when I get older. I worry about it a lot, but what can you do? Something is going to get us all, in the end.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 02:08 PM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,009
Thanks: 11,117
Thanked 9,252 Times in 5,734 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1069 View Post
My dad has Type 2, diagnosed in his mid-50s (he's in his late 50s now).
It was very unexpected, as he is not overweight and has been quite active for most of his life. We figure it must be hereditary (his parents died young, and there aren't any other older family members still living, so it's hard to know what to expect as we get older).
He has had a hell of a time keeping his diabetes under control. I know it affects his moods/emotional state a lot, and I am assuming it affects his physical well being also.
I was borderline diabetic with this last pregnancy, so I guess I'll probably have Type 2 diabetes too, when I get older. I worry about it a lot, but what can you do? Something is going to get us all, in the end.
Yes, we will all die of something, but I rather it be of old age.

Unfortunately you are correct, Gestational Diabetes greatly increases your chances of developing Type 2. Eat the best you can, exercise and monitor yourself, and hopefully you can delay the onset for as long as possible.
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to GottaGo For This Useful Post:
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 02:59 PM
crazyflamingos's Avatar
What?
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Alabama
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,352
Thanks: 12,200
Thanked 2,828 Times in 1,610 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment


I was diagnosed with what my doctor then called "reactive hypoglycemia" at age 13. What that meant was that my pancreas' "on switch" would get stuck when I consumed too much starch or sugar in a meal.

I first developed problems when I started school and began eating school lunches which probably had double the starch that I was used to eating at home. My symptoms were exactly the same as someone who had taken too much insulin except that my pancreas would eventually stop pumping insulin and my blood sugar would return to somewhat normal as my body drew on fat reserves for fuel. The lowest it ever measured on a glucose tolerance test was around 40.

My doctor told me then that I would probably become diabetic some day and that how long it took depended somewhat on how well I controlled my diet in the meantime.

As a teenager, I learned to avoid blood sugar crashes by eating a fairly low-carb, high protein diet and eating small protein snacks every two hours. I stuck to that routine most of the next forty years. Occasionally I did lapse into bad eating habits but, since that made me feel very ill all the time, I always got back on track.

But about 3 years ago I became diabetic anyway. My blood sugar shot up to around 300 and nothing that I did diet-wise seemed to make any difference. So I was put on insulin.

At the same time, I was also put on opiate pain killers for a separate problem. The opiates completely killed my appetite -- to the point that I had to force myself to consume enough calories to remain functional -- and I lost a lot of weight very quickly.

And, after about six months, suddenly my morning blood sugars were in the low 70s and my daytime numbers barely breaking 100.

I started waking up in the middle of the night with symptoms of hypoglycemia and started checking my sugars then. They were in the 50s to 60s.

I stopped taking insulin and, once again, I am able to control my blood sugar through diet. Occasionally it gets a bit high but I usually know that there is a piece of cake or pie to blame for that. LOL

The short version of this is that the thing that you hear about how losing weight will sometimes reverse diabetes symptoms is true. I am sure that is what did it for me.
__________________

"A rising tide has lifted all yachts." Warren Buffett


Obama is not a dark skinned, anti-war socialist who gives away free health care; you're thinking of Jesus.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to crazyflamingos For This Useful Post:
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 12-14-2011, 03:06 PM
GottaGo's Avatar
Sanity is overrated.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Miles to go before I sleep
Posts: 13,009
Thanks: 11,117
Thanked 9,252 Times in 5,734 Posts
Default Re: Diabetes research & treatment

Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyflamingos View Post

I was diagnosed with what my doctor then called "reactive hypoglycemia" at age 13. What that meant was that my pancreas' "on switch" would get stuck when I consumed too much starch or sugar in a meal.

I first developed problems when I started school and began eating school lunches which probably had double the starch that I was used to eating at home. My symptoms were exactly the same as someone who had taken too much insulin except that my pancreas would eventually stop pumping insulin and my blood sugar would return to somewhat normal as my body drew on fat reserves for fuel. The lowest it ever measured on a glucose tolerance test was around 40.

My doctor told me then that I would probably become diabetic some day and that how long it took depended somewhat on how well I controlled my diet in the meantime.

As a teenager, I learned to avoid blood sugar crashes by eating a fairly low-carb, high protein diet and eating small protein snacks every two hours. I stuck to that routine most of the next forty years. Occasionally I did lapse into bad eating habits but, since that made me feel very ill all the time, I always got back on track.

But about 3 years ago I became diabetic anyway. My blood sugar shot up to around 300 and nothing that I did diet-wise seemed to make any difference. So I was put on insulin.

At the same time, I was also put on opiate pain killers for a separate problem. The opiates completely killed my appetite -- to the point that I had to force myself to consume enough calories to remain functional -- and I lost a lot of weight very quickly.

And, after about six months, suddenly my morning blood sugars were in the low 70s and my daytime numbers barely breaking 100.

I started waking up in the middle of the night with symptoms of hypoglycemia and started checking my sugars then. They were in the 50s to 60s.

I stopped taking insulin and, once again, I am able to control my blood sugar through diet. Occasionally it gets a bit high but I usually know that there is a piece of cake or pie to blame for that. LOL

The short version of this is that the thing that you hear about how losing weight will sometimes reverse diabetes symptoms is true. I am sure that is what did it for me.
I've never heard of reactive hypoglycemia before. A new research path for me to explore.

Oh, what I didn't know about the subject 6 years ago....
__________________
Your life is the sum total of the choices you make.
If you don't laugh at yourself, a whole bunch of people will volunteer to do it for you
I never lose. I either win, or I learn....
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
and, diabetes, research, treatment

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0