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Economics Discuss Rural America Faces A Crisis In 'Adequate Housing' at the Political Forums; https://www.npr.org/2018/08/11/63464...t=nprml&f=1001 Along the country roads that fan out from Ogallala, Neb., there are abandoned, weathered old farmhouses and collapsed barns, ...

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Old 08-11-2018, 02:28 PM
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Default Rural America Faces A Crisis In 'Adequate Housing'

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/11/63464...t=nprml&f=1001
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Along the country roads that fan out from Ogallala, Neb., there are abandoned, weathered old farmhouses and collapsed barns, remnants of the hardscrabble settlers who first tapped the Ogallala aquifer and turned the dry, high plains into lush wheat and corn fields.

Like a lot of the Midwest, western Nebraska slowly emptied out over the years, which is why a lot of locals say the current housing shortage is nothing short of a paradox.

"It's a tricky situation," says Mary Wilson, director of the local economic development office in Ogallala, population 4,500. For Wilson, the crisis that rural towns face would be more aptly dubbed a shortage of adequate housing.

"People aren't updating their homes before they throw them on the market," she says. "And people are living in their homes longer here."

Economists say this phenomenon of "aging in place" is one of the main factors driving a shortage in housing nationwide. According to one analysis, people are living in their homes twice as long as they did before the Great Recession. Small towns like Ogallala are no exception to this trend. Ogallala's residents tend to skew older. And the town's remoteness and distance from a major power center like Omaha or Denver mean its problems with housing could be even harder to solve.

When Wilson moved to town from Colorado five years ago, drawn back to the small town Nebraska she grew up in, she and her husband had a hard time finding something suitable.

"We had to settle for what was available," Wilson says, driving down a quiet, leafy street of larger homes in the center of town. Many homes here were built for a far different time, before mechanization, when you needed big families to work the farms. Most are outdated. The few that are on the market, Wilson says, often need thousands of dollars worth of upgrades.

Most people can't — or aren't willing to — pay that.

"My role as the economic development director is bringing business and industry to town, retaining the business and industries that we have, doing what I can to expand that tax base," Wilson says. "It's difficult to do that when we don't have adequate housing."

This is the classic "chicken and egg" that has long plagued rural America, but the problem is being magnified now by the housing shortage. Nationally, housing economists lay blame on a number of things, including the high price of lumber due to new tariffs on Canadian wood. There's also a labor shortage — after the 2008 housing collapse, construction workers left the trades in droves.

Doug Davis, a longtime local real estate man and developer, says it's even worse in small towns. He says there's easily enough demand in Ogallala to build and sell 40 new houses in the next few years. For now, he's just proud to have built three recently.

"In the bigger cities, you [at least] have a selection," Davis says. "I couldn't go out and get five bids on a plumber to do this house, because they're all busy."

A lot of the contractors who are here are getting older and close to retirement. That slowed construction significantly on a 1,300-square-foot home Davis recently built and sold in the center of town. Marketed as workforce housing, the home has modern, higher-end furnishings and is considerably more energy efficient than much of the town's aging housing stock.

"The longest I've ever had a house up for sale has been probably three weeks," Davis says. "Most of my houses are sold before they're done."

That latest sold for $178,000. That's a lot of money in Ogallala, where wages are depressed because of agriculture commodity prices. Longtime locals are "aging in place" here, but there is also an influx of newcomers driving up prices. Retirees are moving to the area from higher-priced cities in the region. People are also drawn by the town's proximity to a popular boating reservoir and more generally to its small-town feel, including a vintage movie theater and downtown shops that still sell practical items.

"Prices have gone up quite a bit in this area from the influx of people from Denver buying second homes or retiring out here and willing to spend a little bit of money," says Joe Kempton, a physical therapist at the community hospital....the rest of article
Well the problem in adequate housing , as I see it, is like Elizabeth Warren described in a speech, there are no starter homes any more. All is priced at the 3rd home level. I can remember when people used to first invest in a one br, , wait for the markets to go up or maybe upgrade and sell :use leftover money for a down payment and furniture etc., for 2nd home or expansion to raise kids. If needed, purchase 3rd larger home. And or a retirement condo or lake house. That process has all been cut away now.
I first noticed mortgage lenders and Developers were driving the market when they started buying Arizona desert w/o access to water then selling it for in the millions. Can you spell stuck? M O R T G A G E P A Y M E N T.

Also it said a guy sold a home in Nebraska for 178K. If all the homes there are fixer uppers or must be upgraded, fvck paying that price

Not being able to pay off your first home till retirement age is a big drag on our economy imho.
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:55 AM
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Default Re: Rural America Faces A Crisis In 'Adequate Housing'

Pocahontas continues laying down the same demogoguery about wealthy people like her are keeping us poor folk down. This time the complaint is a lack of so-called starter homes. Alternatives like manufactured homes are ignored in the rush to condemn evil bankers.
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Old 08-12-2018, 11:44 AM
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Default Re: Rural America Faces A Crisis In 'Adequate Housing'

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Originally Posted by saltwn View Post
This whole @benshapiro offering to debate @Ocasio2018 issue is ridiculous and shows the bias of the media in favor of the right-wing. Fine, I offer the same $10,000 to debate @tedcruz. Not joking. Guaranteed it gets no coverage. Why won't the bumbling coward Ted Cruz debate me?!
Your signature line is completely idiotic.

Ms Ocasio-Cortez declared that the "right-wing" didn't want to debate. She was offered a chance to debate and tried to turn that offer into a bullspit hide-splaining wimpout.

Ted Cruz never claimed the left wasn't willing to debate, then dodged a debate offer from a known left personality.

Yer signature line is wrong twice.

By the way, owning a home isn't an investment, at best it's a hedge against inflation. Stocks are an investment, bonds are an investment, rental property is an investment. The home you live in, not an investment. Realtors and the media seem to think that home ownership is some sort of investment instead of a home to live in.

Oh, Seattle and San Francisco have way bigger homeless problems than any 'rural America' town.
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Old 08-12-2018, 07:00 PM
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Default Re: Rural America Faces A Crisis In 'Adequate Housing'

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Originally Posted by AZRWinger View Post
Pocahontas continues laying down the same demogoguery about wealthy people like her are keeping us poor folk down. This time the complaint is a lack of so-called starter homes. Alternatives like manufactured homes are ignored in the rush to condemn evil bankers.
Not bankers. Congress
Big Commercial banks were allowed again to mix with family checking and home mortgages. Other safety measures were torn off as well.
Nobody claims this is about rich vs poor but you.
Guilty conscience or Freudian slip?
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