Political Wrinkles  

Go Back   Political Wrinkles > Political Forums > Economics
Register FAQDonate PW Store PW Trivia Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Economics Discuss Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto Rico at the Political Forums; Whitefish Energy, from Ryan Zinke’s hometown, received a $300 Million contract to fix Puerto Rico’s power grid. A tiny, 2-year-old ...

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-24-2017, 10:27 PM
saltwn's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Esto perpetua
Posts: 81,673
Thanks: 55,567
Thanked 26,334 Times in 18,855 Posts
Send a message via AIM to saltwn Send a message via MSN to saltwn Send a message via Yahoo to saltwn
Default Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto Rico

Whitefish Energy, from Ryan Zinke’s hometown, received a $300 Million contract to fix Puerto Rico’s power grid.


Quote:
A tiny, 2-year-old energy company from a small town in Montana won a $300 million contract to fix Puerto Rico’s hurricane-ravaged power grid, raising concerns about the decision-making behind the lucrative deal and the company’s ties to people connected to the Trump administration, as well as the company’s ability to fully meet Puerto Rico’s recovery needs.
other concerns:
https://www.bustle.com/p/why-whitefi...ebrows-2979614
Quote:
At a rate of $330/hour for a site supervisor, along with $332/night for accommodations and $80/day for food, it's a personnel cost that is not quite the norm for similar projects. According to Fortune, a utility repair worker would normally earn $50/hour, though that wage does go up significantly for post-natural disaster repairs. Journeymen linemen repairing the damage from Hurricane Irma in Florida made $75/hour for regular work, and up to $100/hour for overtime. As one worker put it, "I'll probably make 30 grand this month."

read these informative articles also here's a quicker run down:

__________________
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."
- Albert Camus
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-27-2017, 05:25 PM
saltwn's Avatar
PW Enlightenment
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Esto perpetua
Posts: 81,673
Thanks: 55,567
Thanked 26,334 Times in 18,855 Posts
Send a message via AIM to saltwn Send a message via MSN to saltwn Send a message via Yahoo to saltwn
Default Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

Here's What's In That $300 Million Whitefish Contract : The Two-Way : NPR
Quote:
Last week, a tiny company in Montana called Whitefish Energy Holdings announced that it had been given a $300 million contract with Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority to help restore electricity on the island, which was severely damaged last month by Hurricane Maria. As we reported, that deal was met with surprise and suspicion from many: The project is enormous, and Whitefish is a two-year-old firm that until recently had just two full-time employees.
and The $300 Million Contract Awarded to the Interior Secretary's Friend's Company Is Exempt from Government Audits
Quote:
The federal government has awarded a tiny Montana company a $300 million no-bid contract to repair Puerto Rico's hurricane-wrecked electrical grid. The company, Whitefish Energy, has close ties to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. A copy of that contract leaked last night, and it seems to prohibit the federal government from auditing Whitefish's work and to shield other details of the company's efforts from being disclosed via open records laws.

"In no event," the contract says, will the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Comptroller General of the United States, "or any of their authorized representatives have the right to audit or review the cost and profit elements" of the deal.
Drain the Swamp?
__________________
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."
- Albert Camus
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-27-2017, 06:29 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Thumbs down Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

Granny says, "Dat's right...

... Da fix is in."
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-27-2017, 08:33 PM
Bat Bat is offline
Hinged
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,817
Thanks: 74
Thanked 1,224 Times in 739 Posts
Default Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

Nothingburger.
Puerto Rico's government awarded the contract, not the Federal government.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bat For This Useful Post:
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2017, 04:12 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Red face Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

G-men gonna get to the bottom of it...

Source: FBI opens inquiry into Whitefish's Puerto Rico contract
Mon October 30, 2017 | Washington (CNN)The FBI has opened a preliminary inquiry into the $300 million Whitefish Energy Holdings contract secured by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, according to a source with knowledge of the inquiry.
Quote:
The energy firm was contracted to rebuild the damaged electrical grid that was destroyed by hurricanes that struck the island. The Wall Street Journal was first to report the existence of the FBI probe. If the FBI's preliminary inquiry develops into a full investigation of the contract, it would join several other reviews of the contract already underway. It wasn't immediately clear what about the deal the FBI would be investigating. But members of Congress have raised concerns over the manner in which the contract for essential work to rebuild the island's decimated grid was awarded to the small Montana company. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has also raised concerns over whether the amount of the contract awarded was reasonable.

The company also has ties to the Trump administration. The company is based in and named after the small hometown of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, and the CEO is an acquaintance of the secretary. An investment firm that owns a major stake in the company is run by a donor to Trump's presidential campaign. The company, Zinke, the White House, and PREPA have denied any wrongdoing in issuing the contract. The Department of Homeland Security's inspector general said it opened a review of the contract after a CNN report highlighted the contract and calls from members of Congress. The office said it considers the investigation to be one of its high priority cases. At least two committees on Capitol Hill have also asked questions about the contract.

However, the FBI field office in San Juan would neither confirm nor deny an investigation.
Whitefish Energy spokesman Ken Luce said the company has not been contacted by the FBI. "While Whitefish is not aware of any such investigation, Whitefish is committed to full cooperation with any inquiry or investigation," Luce told CNN. "The procurement of the PREPA contract was at all times fully appropriate. Our focus continues to be on our work in Puerto Rico completing the work PREPA has tasked Whitefish to complete including the repair of the second major transmission line."

Source: FBI opens inquiry into Whitefish's Puerto Rico contract - CNNPolitics
See also:

Puerto Rico Power Authority Moves to Cancel Whitefish Contract After Plea From Governor
Oct 29 2017 — The head of Puerto Rico’s power authority moved on Sunday to cancel a controversial contract with Whitefish Energy, the small Montana company under scrutiny for the deal worth hundreds of millions to help restore power to the hurricane-ravaged island.
Quote:
The announcement of the upcoming cancellation came just a few hours after Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló asked the board of Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to cancel the contract with Whitefish during a news conference on Sunday morning. PREPA CEO Ricardo Ramos said during a news conference Sunday afternoon that he accepted the governor's recommendation and would be writing a letter to the board of directors "asking for a resolution that will allow me to cancel the contract," adding that the contract was not officially canceled as of yet. Ramos added that the plan was for Whitefish to "finish what they started," which was work on two transmission lines on the island. He added that he hoped to speak with officials at Whitefish within the next few hours and that the contract required a 30-day notice for cancellation. "Even if I cancel today it becomes effective in 30 days," he added.

Earlier Sunday, Gov. Rosselló said he was calling on PREPA to cancel the contract out of public interest. “In light of the information that has come about with regards to the contracting of Whitefish Energy and in the interests of protecting our public interests I have asked the board of the power authority to invoke the cancellation clause in the contract immediately,” Rosselló said. “There can be no distraction that alters the commitment to lift up the electrical system as quickly as possible,” he added in a post on social media. The governor had previously called for the Office of the Comptroller to investigate and audit the contracting process of the company by PREPA. The governor also called for the installation of a "special outside coordinator" in terms of contracts and purchases, "so that we can have more clarity in this process."

Ramos said he will follow the governor's suggestion and will move to cancel the contract. Ramos said that the move to cancel the deal comes after the controversy over the contract, but did not signal that there was anything "outside of the law" with the agreement. He added that Whitefish had been doing a great job but that political distractions had snowballed. Ramos said the cancellation will not stop any work the company currently has in progress, but could delay other grid-restoration efforts by 10 to 12 weeks. He also said it would cost PREPA additional money to demobilize the contract.

Whitefish Energy said in a statement Sunday evening that it was "very disappointed" that the governor asked PREPA to cancel the contract, "which led to PREPA's announcement this afternoon." "The decision will only delay what the people of Puerto Rico want and deserve — to have the power restored quickly in the same manner their fellow citizens on the mainland experience after a natural disaster," the company said in the statement. "We will certainly finish any work that PREPA wants us to complete and stand by our commitments knowing that we made an important contribution to the restoration of the power grid since our arrival on the island on October 2."

The company said it was proud of the work it had done and that in less than a month, it had "brought 350 workers with specific expertise in this task and were on track to have more than 500 linesmen on the island by this week if allowed to continue." "We only wish the best for the great people of Puerto Rico. We are very proud of our contributions to the island's recovery and proud of the tremendous work that our team has done under very challenging conditions," the statement added. The chief executive of Whitefish Energy, Andy Techmanski, told NBC News from San Juan on Saturday that he first made contact with officials on Puerto Rico through the business networking site LinkedIn shortly after Hurricane Irma hit in September — and not through any previous connections. He said he kept in contact with them through Hurricane Maria's devastation.

MORE
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to waltky For This Useful Post:
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-31-2017, 11:18 AM
Conservative Sage
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 17,924
Thanks: 11,299
Thanked 12,006 Times in 7,097 Posts
Send a message via ICQ to AZRWinger
Default Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

Compare site supervisor pay to lineman's pay then complain about gouging. This is what passes for journalism among the Trump hating media.
__________________
What is a 30 something year old single man with a rock in one hand and a Honduran flag in the other?

An asylum seeker.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-23-2017, 10:39 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Okolona
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,220
Thanks: 1,645
Thanked 609 Times in 522 Posts
Lightbulb Re: Small Company With Connections to Trump Administration Wins $300 Million Puerto R

Most of the island still without electricity...

If The Developing World Can Go Solar, Maybe Puerto Rico Can Too
November 22, 2017 • With most of the island still without electricity, some Puerto Ricans are hoping to follow the example of developing world countries — and turn to the sun for power.
Quote:
Puerto Rico is in the midst of the worst electricity outage in U.S. history. Most of the island remains without power more than two months after Hurricane Maria hit the island. Some Puerto Ricans are saying that the current crisis should be a wake-up call that the island needs to move to a less centralized power system — and that solar power might be part of the solution. In other words, they believe Puerto Rico should follow the lead of many developing nations where solar power production is expanding rapidly. Despite being part of the United States, Puerto Rico has electrical woes similar to those facing deeply impoverished nations in Africa and Southeast Asia. Hurricane Maria, which hit Puerto Rico on September 20 as a Category 4 hurricane, caused the entire electric grid to collapse.

But things weren't exactly in good shape pre-Maria. The transmission lines and power plants of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, also known as PREPA, were crumbling due to a lack of maintenance. The rates it charged were higher than any utility on the mainland, yet still PREPA was financially broke. This summer the power authority filed for bankruptcy after failing to make payments on part of its $9 billion in debts. "PREPA has failed," says Arturo Massol Deyá, who lives in the small city of Adjuntas in the island's mountainous interior. Weeks after Maria hit, most of the 20,000 residents of Adjuntas are still without electricity. "The only people that have power are the ones that own their own generators.But from the government ... zero, nothing." Massol is a professor of microbiology and ecology at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez and is on the board of directors of Casa Pueblo, a nonprofit community group based in Adjuntas.


These solar panels were set up by Tesla at the San Juan Children's Hospital after the island was hit by Hurricane Maria.

And Massol is one of the islanders who still has power because he has solar panels. Massol and other activists from Casa Pueblo have been advocating for years for Puerto Rico to embrace alternative forms of energy. The group installed its first array of solar panels 18 years ago. Massol and others are saying Puerto Rico should use this disaster as an opportunity to move away from what Massol refers to as an "obsolete, corrupt model of power generation." Currently utility crews, FEMA and the Puerto Rico government are frantically trying to re-string electric lines and get power back across the island.

Casa Pueblo is pushing a program they're calling "50 with Sun" which sets a goal of generating 50 percent of the island's electricity from solar. "Engineers at the University of Puerto Rico have stated that if 60 to 65 percent of all the roof surfaces that we have in the island right now were covered with solar power panels, we can generate 100 percent of that demand energy demand at peak hours," Massol says. "So what we're saying is the potential is out there." But that would be a huge shift for Puerto Rico. Prior to Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico was getting only a tiny percentage of its electricity from solar.According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration only two percent of island's power last year was coming from renewable energy sources of any kind. "The commonwealth has some renewable solar, wind, hydropower and biomass resources but relies primarily on imported fossil fuels to meet its energy needs," the EIA states in its latest profile of Puerto Rico.

MORE
See also:

Earth Is Lit, And That's A Problem
November 22, 2017 • Over the last five years, global light pollution has increased nearly 10 percent, a new study shows, The fastest rise occurred in developing nations.
Quote:
The ever-widening use of artificial lights is making the nighttime Earth glow increasingly brighter, with the amount of global light growing about 2 percent each year. That worries advocates for the protection of dark skies, who say that artificial night glow can affect wildlife like migrating birds and keeps people from connecting to the stars. What's more, they say, all that wasted light sent out into space is effectively wasted money. The findings are in a new study in the journal Science Advances that used five years of data from a satellite launched in 2011. This satellite has an instrument that gives scientists a more reliable way to measure nighttime light than they've had in the past. "The areas that are getting brighter rapidly are developing countries," says Christopher Kyba, a researcher at the German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam. "So a lot of places in South America, Africa and Asia are brightening really, really rapidly, up to 10 percent or more per year, even, in some cases."


Astronauts aboard the International Space Station took this image of southern Scandinavia lit up at night. A green aurora is visible over the horizon.

Only a few countries — like war-ravaged Yemen and Syria — showed a decrease. Some of the very brightest places on Earth, such as the United States, Spain, and Italy, appeared to remain relatively stable. With new solid-state lighting technology becoming available, some areas have started making a switch to LEDs. And because this satellite is not able to see all of the light emitted by LEDs, Kyba says the brightening that's actually happening is probably greater than what's been measured. "For the United States, for example, we don't see much of a change. But we know that a lot of LEDs are going in. And that means that the United States is almost certainly getting brighter, in terms of how people see the world with their human eyes," Kyba explains.

Some have suggested that energy-savings from LEDs will reduce the cost of lighting. But the researchers found that "as light gets cheaper, we use more of it, nearly proportionately to the rate at which it's getting cheaper," Kyba says. On a global or national scale, all this wasted light is expensive, he says: "It costs a lot of money to radiate that light into space and it's not doing anybody any good."


Paris, often referred to as the "City of Light", as photographed by astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

He and others argue that lighting efforts must be well-designed to reduce the amount of light going out into space while still providing a safe and comfortable experience for people on the ground who need to see at night. The rapid increase in night lighting has been a profound change, a kind of global experiment, that has happened in just the last 100 years. "My mum, for example, grew up on a farm in Saskatchewan, in a time before they had electrification," Kyba says. "So she grew up with an amazing starry sky, and now she lives, within one lifetime, under a very light-polluted sky."

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...it-up-at-night
Related:

Deputy Helps Native Puerto Rico From Houston
November 23, 2017 - Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Armando Aviles Jr. decided to hold a two-day relief drive at a Kroger in northwest Houston, an area he now patrols.
Quote:
Armando Aviles Jr. fondly recalls the soothing sounds of "coquis" or frogs during the summers he spent as a boy in Puerto Rico. The memory of those sounds was a call to arms for the Harris County Sheriff's deputy after Hurricane Maria devastated his native island. Just weeks earlier, the deputy with the Harris County Sheriff's Office had rescued flooded victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston. "They needed help, (and) I could get to them," said Aviles, who felt fortunate to only suffer some minor damage at the home he shares with his wife and five stepchildren. When Maria hit, he said: "My family needed help, and I couldn't get to them."

Aviles' cousins and grandparents live in Aguas Buenas, but he had no way of immediately getting to the mountain town thousands of miles away. Worry paralyzed the deputy as he sat at home trying to figure out a way to help his isolated relatives. "I'm not rich," he said. "I don't have the hook up with big organizations. I can't call somebody and say, 'Hey give me a plane.' " Aviles grew up in New Jersey but spent summers in Puerto Rico, where he was born. He couldn't stop thinking about his family running out of food and living without electricity and water. The 35-year-old deputy decided to hold a two-day relief drive at Kroger on Highway 6 in northwest Houston, an area he now patrols. He's worked six years for the sheriff's office. As Aviles started putting plans into place, he asked the area Kroger manager if he could use the store to keep donations and hold the drive.


Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Armando Aviles Jr.'s cousins and grandparents live in Aguas Buenas, but he had no way of immediately getting to the mountain town thousands of miles away. Worry paralyzed the deputy as he sat at home trying to figure out a way to help his isolated relatives.

The manager broke down in tears, confiding to Aviles that she, too, was Puerto Rican. The plan started to come together. Aviles spread the word on social media. He also partnered with another deputy who is an executive for United Sikhs, an organization that has been active in hurricane relief. In a moment of panic, he remembers asking his wife, "What if nobody shows up?" Instead, he watched Puerto Ricans from across Houston flood the store to donate whatever they could. "All these Puerto Ricans came out from different backgrounds, different jobs, even Puerto Ricans who didn't have any money. Puerto Ricans who are unemployed, children," Aviles said. "They came out and wanted to help."

MORE https://www.officer.com/command-hq/s...o-from-houston

Last edited by waltky; 11-23-2017 at 10:51 AM..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
$300, administration, company, connections, million, puerto, rico, small, trump, wins, with

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0