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Economics Discuss What Jobs Will the Robots Take? at the Political Forums; What Jobs Will the Robots Take? - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic Jan 23, 2014 I might have titled this ...

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Old 02-07-2014, 02:22 AM
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Default What Jobs Will the Robots Take?

What Jobs Will the Robots Take? - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic
Jan 23, 2014

I might have titled this article, Why You'd Be Kinder to Encourage Low-Skilled Workers to Sell Their Surplus Organs Than to Demand an Increase in the Minimum Wage. But maybe that's too wordy.

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It is an invisible force that goes by many names. Computerization. Automation. Artificial intelligence. Technology. Innovation. And, everyone's favorite, ROBOTS.

Whatever name you prefer, some form of it has been stoking progress and killing jobs—from seamstresses to paralegals—for centuries. But this time is different: Nearly half of American jobs today could be automated in "a decade or two," according to a new paper by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael A. Osborne, discussed recently in The Economist. The question is: Which half?

Another way of posing the same question is: Where do machines work better than people? Tractors are more powerful than farmers. Robotic arms are stronger and more tireless than assembly-line workers. But in the past 30 years, software and robots have thrived at replacing a particular kind of occupation: the average-wage, middle-skill, routine-heavy worker, especially in manufacturing and office admin.
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Meanwhile, lower-skill workers have been protected by the Moravec moat. Hans Moravec was a futurist who pointed out that machine technology mimicked a savant infant: Machines could do long math equations instantly and beat anybody in chess, but they can't answer a simple question or walk up a flight of stairs. As a result, menial work done by people without much education (like home health care workers, or fast-food attendants) have been spared, too.

But perhaps we've hit an inflection point. As Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee pointed out in their book Race Against the Machine (and in their new book The Second Machine Age), robots are finally crossing these moats by moving and thinking like people. Amazon has bought robots to work its warehouses. Narrative Science can write earnings summaries that are indistinguishable from wire reports. We can say to our phones I'm lost, help and our phones can tell us how to get home.
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Old 02-07-2014, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: What Jobs Will the Robots Take?

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Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
What Jobs Will the Robots Take? - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic
Jan 23, 2014

I might have titled this article, Why You'd Be Kinder to Encourage Low-Skilled Workers to Sell Their Surplus Organs Than to Demand an Increase in the Minimum Wage. But maybe that's too wordy.
"fast-food attendants"? If I had the money to invest, I'd build a "Big Mac machine" that would assemble burgers. I only know a little about implementation and I could easily design a system to make automated burgers. Put up a kiosk and the user simply punches in their order and in a couple of minutes you get your meal. McDonalds already uses automated pop machines, so all that's needed is the rest of the meal.
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Old 04-16-2017, 10:53 PM
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A robot took Uncle Ferd's job wringin' farts outta shirt-tails atta dry cleaners...

Will Robots Replace Human Drivers, Doctors and Other Workers?
April 15, 2017 - The impact of automation on U.S. jobs is open to debate. Robots have displaced millions of manufacturing workers, and automation is getting cheaper and more common, raising concerns it will eventually supplant far more workers in the services sector of the economy, which includes everything from truck driving to banking.
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University of Virginia Darden School of Business Professor Ed Hess says we are just starting to see automation's impact. "It is going to be broad and it is going to be deep," he said, adding that "tens of millions" of jobs could be at risk. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show 5 million U.S. manufacturing jobs have disappeared already. While some politicians blame trade for the job losses, most economists say automation is mainly to blame as robots do routine factory tasks previously done by humans.


A man uses an automated teller machine (ATM) machine at a shopping center in Yangon, Burma

Hess calls self-driving cars and trucks a threat to millions of human jobs, and says fast-food workers are also vulnerable, as companies install electronic kiosks to take restaurant orders. McDonalds says displaced workers will be reassigned to other tasks. The professor says research shows nearly half of U.S. jobs could be automated, including retail store clerks, doctors who scan X-rays for disease, administrative workers, legal staffers, and middle managers.

Future of jobs

Starting more than a century ago, advancing technology changed the United States from an agrarian to a manufacturing economy. Displaced farm hands eventually found factory work, but the transition took years. This new transition may also take a time because, Hess says, "We're not going to anywhere produce the number of jobs that we automate." But 50 years of experience in banking shows that while automation may change the industry, it does not necessarily end jobs for humans.


A laser-guided "parking robot" moves to slide under a car at a research and development center in Shenzhen, China

The first Automatic Teller Machines, or ATMs, were installed 50 years ago, and there are now 420,000 in the United States. International Monetary Fund analysis shows the number of human tellers did not drop, but rose slightly. "Humans were doing mostly service and routine types of tasks that could be converted into more automated tasks," Tremont Capital Group's Sam Ditzion said. But "the humans then became far more valuable in customer service and in sales in these branches." In a Skype interview, Ditzion said that while automation can be "scary," the oversight of ATMs created new kinds of work for "tens of thousands of people."

Automation grows
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Old 04-16-2017, 11:23 PM
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See also:

Rise of the robots: What advances mean for workers
Sun, 16 Apr 2017 - They may threaten the human workforce, but they are crucial to the modern economy.
Quote:
It's about the size and shape of a photocopier. Emitting a gentle whirring noise, it travels across the warehouse floor while two arms raise or lower themselves on scissor lifts, ready for the next task. Each arm has a camera on its knuckle. The left one eases a cardboard box forward on the shelf, the right reaches in and extracts a bottle. Like many new robots, it's from Japan. Hitachi showcased it in 2015 and hopes to be selling it by 2020. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy highlights the inventions, ideas and innovations which have helped create the economic world we live in.


Hitachi's prototype robot with two arms

It is broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can find more information about the programme's sources and listen online or subscribe to the programme podcast. It's not the only robot that can pick a bottle off a shelf - but it's as close as robots have yet come to performing this seemingly simple task as speedily and dextrously as a good old-fashioned human. One day, robots like this might replace warehouse workers altogether. For now, humans and machines run warehouses together.


Rethink Robotics' Baxter robot

In Amazon depots, Kiva robots scurry around, not picking things off shelves, but carrying the shelves to humans for them to select things. In this way, Kiva robots can improve efficiency up to fourfold. Robots and humans work side-by-side in factories, too. Factories have had robots since 1961, when General Motors installed the first Unimate, a one-armed automaton that was used for tasks like welding. But until recently, robots were strictly segregated from human workers - partly to protect the humans, and partly to stop them confusing the robots, whose working conditions had to be strictly controlled. With some new robots, that's no longer necessary. Take Rethink Robotics' Baxter.

'Reshoring' trend
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:55 PM
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Robots to begin replacing teachers...

'Inspirational' robots to begin replacing teachers within 10 years
11 September 2017 • Robots will begin replacing teachers in the classroom within the next ten years as part of a revolution in one-to-one learning, a leading educationalist has predicted.
Quote:
Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham, said intelligent machines that adapt to suit the learning styles of individual children will soon render traditional academic teaching all but redundant. The former Master of Wellington College said programmes currently being developed in Silicon Valley will learn to read the brains and facial expressions of pupils, adapting the method of communication to what works best for them.

The new era of automated teaching promises an end to grouping children by year, as the personalised nature of the robots will enable pupils to learn new material at their own pace, rather than as part of a class. "It will open up the possibility of an Eton or Wellington-style education for all,” Sir Anthony said. "Everyone can have the very best teacher and it's completely personalised; the software you're working with will be with you throughout your education journey.” He warned, however, that the new technology would have to be carefully introduced to avoid “infantilising” pupils and teachers.

As part of robot-led learning, teachers would adopt the role of “overseers”, monitoring the progress of individual pupils, leading non-academic activities and providing pastoral support, Sir Anthony said. The efficiency of automated teaching would also mean that only 30 per cent of school time will be spent in class. A contemporary historian who has written biographies of David Cameron, Tony Blair, John Major and Gordon Brown, Sir Anthony heralds the new educational era in a book, The Fourth Revolution", due out next year. “The impact is going to be massive” he said. “This is beyond anything that we've seen in the industrial revolution or since with any other new technology.”

The first revolution is understood to consist of learning the basics of survival - foraging, hunting, growing crops and building shelters. The second involved the first organised sharing of knowledge and the third was marked by the invention of printing. Automated teaching machines would be “extraordinarily inspirational”, Sir Anthony said. "You'll still have the humans there walking around during school time, but in fact the inspiration in terms of intellectual excitement will come from the lighting-up of the brain which the machines will be superbly well-geared for. "The machines will know what it is that most excites you and gives you a natural level of challenge that is not too hard or too easy, but just right for you." He expected the National Union of Teachers to be "very alarmed" by the prospect.

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Old 09-10-2017, 09:15 PM
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Default Re: What Jobs Will the Robots Take?

all of them
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Old 09-10-2017, 11:36 PM
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all of them
A robot can't take my job.
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:07 AM
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A robot can't take my job.
once doctors said that. now there's an ap.
likely more your job will change and have less hours going into the home more.
and AI will totally replace what we know as a nurse. the person manning the cams and auto technology for multiple patients will need a degree but there'll be no more. nursing as we know it today

i hope i'm gone by then. .
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