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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts him at the General Discussion; Another climate change conspiracy theory shut down. Pushing your agenda as a news anchor should cost you your job. Knowing ...

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Old 08-26-2017, 07:59 PM
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Default CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts him

Another climate change conspiracy theory shut down.

Pushing your agenda as a news anchor should cost you your job.

Knowing CNN they'll prolly give the douche a raise.

Watch: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change ? then scientist shuts him down – TheBlaze

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Old 08-26-2017, 08:12 PM
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Default Re: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts

Every chance for which they can invent a connection to further the lie....;Of Climate Change
Speaking of change...; It's nice to hear an "expert" shut it down.
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Old 09-27-2017, 02:36 AM
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Red face Re: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts

Granny says, "Dat's right - it's cause o' all dat climate change...

September is the most energetic month for hurricanes ever recorded in the Atlantic
September 26,`17 - The 2017 hurricane season has certainly been one for the record books. Whether it be Harvey’s scale-tipping rains, Irma’s off-the-chart winds, or the sheer number of storms that have spun up, this year is clearly anything but normal.
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But how wacky has the weather in the tropics been? For that, meteorologists refer to a figure known as ACE, a measure of every hurricane’s energy put together during its life span. September produced the most ACE in any month on record in the Atlantic Ocean. ACE, or Accumulated Cyclone Energy, is manifest in stirred-up oceans, steamy downpours, crackling lightning and ferocious winds. The force to instigate these nasty conditions is extracted from the roasting waters of the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean, and transformed into motion through a hurricane’s natural “heat engine.” To quantify this measure, scientists take into account the strength of the winds within each and every storm, as well as their duration. ACE is calculated every six hours, and a running tally is kept for each storm so long as it sticks around. The measure does not take into account a storm’s size.

In a given year, ACE across the Atlantic Basin stacks up to an average in the 90s. It’s not terribly unusual for ACE to rise into the triple digits, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration classifies any season that tops 111 as “above average.” On Monday, Phil Klotzbach, a tropical weather research at Colorado State University, tweeted that ACE in the Atlantic had soared to 155.4 for the month of September so far, a new record for any month. It ousted September 2004 as the previous record holder. This September’s ACE is more than we would see in the entirety of what’s considered an extremely active season. Considering the entire season’s hurricane activity, 2017’s ACE already ranks in the top 10 most on record. Thus far, we’re up to the high 180s, with about two months left in hurricane season.


Hurricane Maria

Even with the forecast drop-off of cyclone activity over the next few weeks, we still may approach record territory. 2005 boasted the most ACE of a given season, topping the charts at 250. ACE in the Pacific tends to be about 30 percent higher as a result of the size of the ocean and the greater number of storms that accordingly form. Even the individual storms this season have been in the realm of records. Consider Irma: Its ACE totaled 66.6 over the hurricane’s 13-day lifetime. This is more than two-thirds the typical ACE of an entire season. Only one or two storms have ever drawn up more energy as reported by the ACE model — Category 5 Ivan in 2004 at 70.4, and possibly the San Ciriaco hurricane of 1899. The latter, known as the longest-lived Atlantic hurricane on record, spun at hurricane status for a whopping 23 days. That storm lay siege to Puerto Rico, Turks and Caicos, and the Bahamas, killing more than 3,000 people. That storm’s ACE has been estimated at 73.6.

Klotzbach also listed another important figure that can serve as an indicator of cyclone activity, known as “hurricane days.” This is a simple sum of the number of hurricanes in the Atlantic on a given day. If there were two hurricanes in the ocean on one day, that would count for two “hurricane days.” Between Lee, Maria, Jose, Katia and Irma, September 2017 has generated 35 hurricane days, a record. Klotzbach stated that September 1926 had held the top spot before at 34.5 but said this may be underestimated because of the lack of satellites in that era. No matter how you slice it, it has already been a devastating hurricane season that ranks among the most extreme in history. Fortunately, the tropics are expected to calm down over next couple of weeks.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.ecb4b10c83dc
See also:

Why This Hurricane Season Is So Intense
Sept. 19, 2017 - Warm ocean waters, weak winds and hot air are conspiring to feed frequent and ferocious storms
Quote:
The most severe hurricane season in almost a decade is stoked by warmer-than-average Atlantic Ocean currents, weak westerly Pacific winds and turbulent hot tropical air over the Indian Ocean, with no sign conditions will slacken soon, climate analysts and meteorologists say. “It’s the trifecta,” said atmospheric scientist Jeff Weber, who studies tropical meteorology and climate change at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. “The atmospheric conditions are ideal for hurricane formations.”

So far, the Atlantic hurricane season has spawned 13 named storms and seven hurricanes. An average season, which runs from June through November, typically produces a dozen named storms, with six reaching hurricane strength. Formally rated a Category 5 hurricane, the Maria storm system powered winds up to 160 miles an hour toward the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Monday, while Hurricane Jose, downgraded from its peak intensity as a Category 4 hurricane to a Category 1 system, churned off the eastern seaboard with winds up to 75 miles an hour. Three factors are fueling such intensity, experts say.


Satellite images of hurricanes Jose, top, and Maria this week. Scientists say a confluence of factors are behind this year’s unusually active storm season in the Atlantic.

Warm Atlantic water—running two degrees Fahrenheit or so warmer than usual—is the engine that drives these storm systems and boosts their capacity to store more water vapor that can condense into torrential rains. At the same time, weakening winds from the Pacific have reduced the wind shear that normally saps the strength of developing Atlantic storms. “That is a huge, huge player,” said Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And over the Indian Ocean—far from the scene of the devastation in the U.S. and Caribbean—a tropical rainfall system called the Madden-Julian Oscillation is triggering the formation of the seeds of severe Atlantic storm systems. Its hot, roiling air spins off small atmospheric disruptions that drift across Africa and, under the right conditions, can develop into the beginnings of destructive Atlantic storms. “Right now we are at the peak of a very active season,” said Dr. Bell, “We know there will be more storms—not just more storms forming but more storms threatening” populated areas, he said.

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Old 09-27-2017, 07:13 AM
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Default Re: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts

Granny says, "Dat's right - it's cause o' all dat climate change...


And granny is off her rocker to.

She needs to lay off the hard stuff...

Regards, Kirk
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Old 11-15-2017, 12:55 AM
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Exclamation Re: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts

'Biblical' Rainfall Getting More Likely...

Study: Harvey's 'Biblical' Rainfall Getting More Likely
November 13, 2017 | WASHINGTON — The chances of a hurricane flooding parts of Texas, like Harvey did, have soared sixfold in just 25 years because of global warming and will likely triple once again before the end of the century, a new study says.
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Study author Kerry Emanuel, a meteorology professor and hurricane expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, found that what was once an extremely rare event — 20 inches of rain over a large area of Texas — could soon be almost common. From 1981 to 2000, the probability of 20 inches of rain happening somewhere over a large chunk of Texas was 1 in 100 or even less, Emanuel said. Now it's 6 in 100 and by 2081, those odds will be 18 in 100, he said. "The changes in probabilities are because of global warming,'' Emanuel said. The study was released Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Emanuel said he hurried the study to help Houston officials think about what conditions they should consider when they rebuild.


Cara Crawford, turns around after trying to ride her bike through high water to get to Sunday services at a nearby church, in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Vidor, Texas

Texas state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon said he was struck by the potential for much higher rainfall that Emanuel's simulations predict for the future and how important it is for the design of critical structures like dams and nuclear facilities. "If the worst-case precipitation scenario is getting worse, as Kerry's study and other evidence implies, that safety margin is shrinking,'' Nielsen-Gammon said in an email, highlighting Emanuel's results that also show the worst-case storms becoming wetter and more common. Gabriel Vecchi, a climate scientist at Princeton who wasn't part of the study, said the study confirms what scientists have already thought: "that the most extreme rainfall events will become more likely as the planet warms.'' "These results highlight the importance of finding ways to incorporate our understanding of climate change in long-term urban planning, storm water management and in flood mapping,'' Vecchi said in an email.

To do the study Emanuel had to use some innovative modeling techniques. Global climate models used for future warming studies aren't detailed enough to simulate hurricanes. Hurricane models don't say anything about the larger climate. So Emanuel combined the models and then created thousands and thousands of fictional storm "seedlings'' to see what would happen. Emanuel's calculations used the 20-inch (half a meter) rainfall total because that was the initial figure discussed as the storm was dying down. Later measurements showed that Harvey's rain was far heavier — and far rarer — than initially reported. After Emanuel had started his work, records showed Harvey's Houston-wide rainfall ended up closer to 33 inches (84 centimeters). And in individual areas pit peaked at 60 inches (1.5 meters).


A FEMA rescue team evacuates people from a neighborhood inundated by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston

Emanuel called those numbers "biblical.'' "By the standards of the average climate during 1981-2000, Harvey's rainfall in Houston was `biblical' in the sense that it likely occurred around once since the Old Testament was written,'' Emanuel's study said. While several scientists praised the study's technique, Christopher Landsea, science operations chief at the National Hurricane Center, had some reservations. He said Emanuel's results don't fit with other climate change model projections which do show higher rainfall totals but also show a decrease in the number of storms.

https://www.voanews.com/a/study-says...-/4113978.html
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Old 11-15-2017, 01:54 AM
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Default Re: CNN anchor tries to tie Hurricane Harvey to climate change — then scientist shuts

I remember when there was one significant hurricane every few years not multiple per year. and there has never been a snowfall in my area like there was here last year.
the locals called it snowmaggedon
but the brainwashed love their corporate propaganda so like guns we can't even talk about it without some hit and run bumper sticker knocking down the idea..
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