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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss 2017 Wildfire Season at the General Discussion; Wildfire season out west... California fires spread; blazes tamed in Colorado Mon, Jul 10, 2017 - A pair of California ...

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Old 07-09-2017, 02:02 PM
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Exclamation 2017 Wildfire Season

Wildfire season out west...

California fires spread; blazes tamed in Colorado
Mon, Jul 10, 2017 - A pair of California wildfires have quickly spread, threatening hundreds of homes and forcing evacuations at a popular lakeside campground and a summer camp where flames temporarily trapped children and counselors, a fire official said.
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In other parts of the western US, evacuation orders were lifted in Colorado and Montana towns threatened by wildfires, while air and ground crews battled a growing grass fire in northwestern Colorado. The fire that started early on Saturday afternoon in California’s Santa Barbara County had spread to both sides of Highway 154 and was “completely out of control,” county Fire Department Captain Dave Zaniboni said. About 90 children and 50 counselors were struck at the Circle V Ranch and had to take shelter there until they could be safely evacuated. The Santa Barbara County fire was one of three in California that grew quickly as much of the state baked in heat that broke records.

A record that stood 131 years in Los Angeles was snapped when the temperature spiked at 36.7°C downtown. The previous record of 35°C was set in 1886, the US National Weather Service said. Forecasters warned that temperatures up to 43.3°C would be common in some inland areas and could be deadly for the elderly, children and outdoor workers. Air quality reached “unhealthy” and “very unhealthy” levels in areas inland from Los Angeles. High temperatures and dry gusts tripled the size of another Santa Barbara wildfire to about 77km2 over eight hours and forced evacuations of about 200 homes in a rural area east of Santa Maria, fire spokesman Kirk Sturm said.


Cars drive past flames from the “Wall Fire” along Forbestown Road in Oroville, California

After five years of severe drought, California got a big break with record rainfall and snowpack in parts of the state this year that has delayed the start of fire season in some places, but has also led to explosive vegetation growth that could fuel future fires. In northern California, a Butte County wildfire swept through grassy foothills and destroyed 10 structures, including homes, and led to several minor injuries. The blaze about 97km north of Sacramento grew rapidly to nearly 11km2 and was 20 percent contained, the state Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

The area burning was about 16km south of Oroville, where spillways in the nation’s tallest dam began crumbling from heavy rains this winter and led to temporary evacuation orders for 200,000 residents downstream. In Colorado, residents of nearly 500 homes outside the ski town of Breckenridge were allowed to return home on Friday night. The grass fire in northwestern Colorado had burned 47km2 and was spreading in several directions at once because of wind patterns from passing thunderstorms, fire information officer Chris Barth said. A wildfire in southern Wyoming grew to 8km2. An unknown number of cabins remained under evacuation orders.

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/worl.../10/2003674283
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Old 08-14-2017, 02:40 AM
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Exclamation Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Fire an' flames an' vapors o' smoke...

Portugal, Corsica fight huge fires
Mon, Aug 14, 2017 - Firefighters on Saturday managed to contain huge wildfires in Portugal and the French island of Corsica, although hot weather meant the risk of them spreading again remained high.
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Nearly 1,000 people were evacuated in Corsica overnight, mostly tourists staying at campsites, as 2,000 hectares of scrubland was destroyed, although no casualties were reported. At Cap Corse, the most northerly point of the Mediterranean island where the fire had spread, the blaze was “contained but not controlled,” local authorities said. “It’s hell,” said Christian Burchi, a 50-year-old Sisco resident. “We tried to extinguish the flames with two buckets of water and a ridiculous hose. Everywhere is burning.”

About 180 firefighters, bolstered by reinforcements from the mainland, were battling the flames aided by three fire-bombing aircraft. French Minister of the Interior Gerard Collomb praised the “admirable work” of the hundreds of emergency services. In Portugal, firefighters managed to bring two of the major blazes under control in the center of the country by Saturday afternoon, the civil protection authority announced, while warning that the heatwave could reignite the fires.


A man fights a forest fire near the village of Cioga do Campo, Portugal, on Saturday

Firefighters have stopped the spreading of the flames from the forest fire that raged in the region of Abrantes since Wednesday, authorities said.[ However, more than 500 firefighters, nearly 200 vehicles and three water-bombing helicopters remain on standby should the fires flare up again, they added. A record 220 fires had started on Friday alone, civil protection agency spokeswoman Patricia Gaspar said.

Some residents have voiced anger at authorities after a season of repeated wildfires which have stretched resources. “Firefighters can’t perform miracles, they are exhausted,” Bracal resident Lucia Ricardo said. After an uncommonly dry winter and spring, nearly 79 percent of the Portuguese mainland was enduring extreme or severe drought at the end of last month, the national weather office said.

Portugal, Corsica fight huge fires - Taipei Times
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Firefighters contain huge wildfires in Corsica and Portugal
August 12, 2017 - Firefighters managed to contain huge wildfires in Portugal and the French island of Corsica on Saturday, though hot weather meant the risk of them spreading again remained high.
Quote:
Almost 1,000 people were evacuated in Corsica overnight, mostly tourists staying at campsites, as 2,000 hectares (nearly 5,000 acres) of scrubland was destroyed, although no casualties were reported. The evacuees were put up in schools and other temporary shelters. A man suspected of starting five fires in Bastia, a town with a population of 40,000 in northeast Corsica, was arrested and will remain in detention at least through the weekend, officials said. At Cap Corse, the most northerly point of the Mediterranean island where the fire had spread, the blaze was "contained but not controlled", according to the local authorities Saturday. "It's hell," Christian Burchi, a 50-year-old Sisco resident said. "We tried to extinguish the flames with two buckets of water and a ridiculous hose. Everywhere is burning."


Firemen seek to control a blaze at Pietracorbara on August 11, 2017, on the French island of Corsica

Around 180 firefighters, bolstered by reinforcements from the mainland, were battling the flames aided by three fire-bombing aircraft. Bernard Weber, a 60-year-old Frenchman on holiday in Corsica, spoke of "huge flames everywhere". "It's a bit scary," said a 36-year-old Czech tourist who gave her name as Monika. She said her relatives would spend the night in a school building in Sisco. France's Interior Minister Gerard Collomb praised the "admirable work" of the hundreds of emergency services workers battling the blazes.

- Freak dry spells -

In Portugal firefighters managed to bring two of the major blazes under control in the centre of the country by Saturday afternoon, the civil protection authority announced, while warning that the heatwave could reignite the fires. Firefighters have stopped the spreading of the flames from the forest fire that raged in the region of Abrantes since Wednesday, authorities said. But more than 500 firefighters, nearly 200 vehicles and three water-bombing helicopters remain on standby should the fires flare up again, they added. The other huge fire now under control was at Alvaiazere in the central region of Leiria. Civil protection agency spokeswoman Patricia Gaspar said a record 220 fires had started on Friday alone. "Despite the relentless fires, the situation is now more stable," said Gaspar in Lisbon. Emergency workers had nearly gained control of wildfires across Portugal's drought-hit central region on Thursday, but stronger winds fanned flames in several areas.


After an uncommonly dry winter and spring, almost 79 percent of the Portuguese mainland was enduring extreme or severe drought at the end of July

In the village of Bracal, flames were being blown towards houses as residents grabbed what they could to aid firefighters, an AFP journalist said. Some residents voiced anger at authorities after a season of repeated wildfires which have stretched resources. "Firefighters can't perform miracles, they are exhausted," said Lucia Ricardo, who lives in Bracal, close to Abrantes. Six villages had been evacuated around Abrantes on Thursday as fire-dousing planes flew sorties over the flames. The fires come after more than 60 people were killed in June, and more than 200 injured, in a giant blaze at Pedrogao Grande in central Portugal that raged for five days. After an uncommonly dry winter and spring, almost 79 percent of the Portuguese mainland was enduring extreme or severe drought at the end of July, according to the national weather office.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/huge-wild...004428511.html
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Old 08-19-2017, 07:54 PM
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Exclamation Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Wildfire smoke may obscure eclipse...

Oregon Wildfire Causes Evacuations, Closes Roads in Prime Eclipse Zone
August 19, 2017 — Residents of more than 400 homes in a prime eclipse-viewing location in Oregon were ordered to evacuate Friday because of a rapidly growing wildfire that had already closed access to a portion of a wilderness area and a regional highway.
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The late afternoon order threatened to create more tie-ups on rural and narrow roads already expected to be burdened with up to 200,000 visitors coming to the area from around the world to watch Monday’s total solar eclipse. About 1 million people are expected in Oregon, where the moon’s shadow first makes landfall in the continental U.S. The nearly 11-square-mile (28-square-kilometer) wildfire in the Deschutes National Forest was about six miles (9 kilometers) west of the town of Sisters, which sits on the southern edge of the 70-mile swath of Oregon where the moon will completely blot out the sun.

Regional roads closed

Sisters itself will experience 34 seconds of totality and is a popular tourist destination even without an eclipse brewing, but heavy smoke and the rapidly growing fire have prompted officials to close nearby campsites, recreational areas and roads. So far fire crews have not been able to contain any part of the wildfire and the McKenzie Pass Highway 242 has been closed between Highway 126 and Sisters, said Susie Heisey, a public information officer with Central Oregon Dispatch.


Wildfire burns in Willamette National Forest, Oregon. Elsewhere in the state wildfires have forced evacuations and closed roads near prime eclipse-viewing locations.

The closures will likely have a big impact on people traveling through the region for the eclipse, she said, and the risk is high for more conflagrations in the area with so many campers. “There’s absolutely no campfires allowed and no burning allowed. So we’re just hoping that everyone that’s here to enjoy the eclipse” follows the rules, Heisey said. Nearly two dozen other fires are also burning in Oregon, including nine more in the best eclipse-viewing zone. Large portions of the Mount Jefferson Wilderness, in central Oregon’s Willamette National Forest, are also closed.

Montana and California fires

Elsewhere, fire officials in Montana ordered additional evacuations Friday night after earlier telling residents of 750 homes to flee a fire that jumped control lines in gusty winds. The 30-square-mile (76 square kilometer) blaze on forest land, southwest of the town of Lolo, was started by lightning in July but blew up late Wednesday.


Solar Eclipse Oregon

Two homes burned Friday and several outbuildings burned late Thursday. Evacuations were in effect along the U.S. Highway 93 and U.S. Highway 12 corridors. The town of Florence was under an evacuation warning. In California, crews fighting a fire in Yosemite National Park were trying to guide the flames away from the small town of Wawona and into wilderness. The fire has closed campgrounds and trails in the park but authorities have not ordered anyone to leave. No structures have been damaged.

https://www.voanews.com/a/oregon-wil...e/3992238.html
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:29 AM
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Question Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Canyon Fire evacuees allowed to return home...

Evacuees return to homes threatened by Southern California wildfire
Sept. 27, 2017 -- A fast-moving wildfire in Southern California has been contained well enough that officials said Wednesday they will allow evacuees to return to their homes.
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The Canyon Fire forced the evacuation of roughly 1,500 residents of Corona, about 20 miles east of Anaheim, earlier this week. The fire burned about 2,000 acres along the border between Orange and Riverside counties, but Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Larry Kurtz told the Los Angeles Times Wednesday morning that the fire was 20 percent contained.


The Canyon Fire in Southern California was about 20 percent contained Wednesday morning, when officials allowed evacuees to return to their homes.

At about 10 a.m. Wednesday, the city of Corona Fire Department said in a news release that they had lifted all evacuation orders, allowing only residents to enter the area the fire previously threatened. But Kurtz cautioned the fire has not "completely been mopped up."

Officials from the fire authority said there have been no reported injuries, adding that the fire damaged three structures, KABC-TV, Los Angeles, reported. The fire started Monday and increased in size from 550 acres to around 1,500 in a couple hours.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2017...p&utm_medium=5
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Old 10-09-2017, 07:38 PM
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Wine country in Calif. all ablaze...

Wildfire burns Sonoma and Napa counties, forcing evacuations
Tuesday 10th October, 2017 - Tens of thousands of acres of land in Sonoma and Napa counties were burned down as massive wildfires ravaged the region, forcing mass evacuations.
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Late on Monday, Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency and authorized the mobilization of the California National Guard.b On Monday morning, a raging fire had Santa Rosa under siege, with a large swath of the city north of downtown under evacuation order. The fire jumped the 101 Freeway, forcing hospitals to be evacuated and burning homes and businesses. Napa County Supervisor Diane Dillon said during a televised press conference that as of 6.40 am, over 35,000 acres of land was burnt in the Tubbs fire near Santa Rosa. Officials added that at Atlas Peak, the other large fire in Napa County, between 8,000 and 12,000 acres had been destroyed. Schools throughout the Napa and Sonoma valleys remained closed on Monday, as cellphone service were affected in Napa County. Officials have said that residents and businesses were experiencing power outages and trees have been knocked down by the wind in the county.

Addressing the same press conference, Napa County Fire Chief Barry Biermann said that over 50 structures, including homes and barns, have burned in the Atlas peak fire alone. He added, “The fire has burned all the way through the Silverado Country Club.” Early this morning, residents rushed out of their homes as the flames approached. A Santa Rosa resident, Ron Dodds were quoted in a report in KTVU as saying, "People are running red lights, there is chaos ensuing. It's a scary time. It looks like Armageddon." Meanwhile, officials said that Fountaingrove appeared to be particularly hard hit, with photos posted online showing numerous homes on fire. Houses in the community of Kenwood and at a mobile home park off the 101 Freeway were also destroyed.


Authorities had set up many evacuation centers, however, some were filled to capacity due to a large number of people fleeing. Bay Area, San Francisco, and even San Jose were affected by the drifting smoke. Many people have been rushed to the hospitals for injuries, but no deaths have been reported yet in Napa County. So far, there are no estimates of how many people may be injured. Spokesman Will Powers said that Cal Fire is keeping track of three other fires in Napa, Sonoma and Lake counties. Authorities confirmed that the Adobe fire in Sonoma County is affecting Glen Ellen and Kenwood; the Partrick fire is hitting Napa, and the Sulphur Fire in Lake County is threatening Clearlake and has burned about 1,800 acres, including structures. He added that taking all the fires into account, more than 1,000 people have been evacuated so far.

Meanwhile, Napa County spokeswoman Kristi Jourdan added, “The smell of smoke is everywhere throughout the county. As the sun comes up we can’t really see it.” In Santa Rosa, Kaiser Permanente Hospital and Sutter Hospital were evacuated. And Kaiser spokeswoman Jenny Mack said, “We have safely evacuated the Santa Rosa medical center due to fires burning in the area. Many patients were transported to Kaiser Permanente in San Rafael and other local hospitals. All scheduled appointments and surgeries have been canceled for the day in Santa Rosa and the Napa Medical Offices.” Rattigan added that structures have burned, however, that there is no estimate of how far the fires have spread and how many structures have burned. The cause of the fires are still under investigation.

Rattigan added, “It’s been incredibly windy here,” winds are consistently “around 15 miles per hour and we have gusts up to 22 miles per hour, and we’re expecting that to continue throughout the day.” She added that over 300 firefighters are battling the blazes in Napa County currently. There are three evacuation centers for Napa County residents, however, one of them in Crosswalk Community Church is full. Napa Valley visitor Chris Thomas has said, “When I started loading stuff into the car it was a hell-storm of smoke and ash. There were 30- to 40-mph winds. I couldn’t even breathe. It went from being an annoying evacuation to something really scary.”

Wildfire burns Sonoma and Napa counties forcing evacuations
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Old 10-10-2017, 04:17 PM
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Exclamation Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Fires that are among the worst in state history...

California fires: Thirteen dead in wine country
Tue, 10 Oct 2017 - Wildfires that are among the worst in state history burn more than 100,000 acres in just 12 hours.
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At least 13 people have now died in fast-spreading fires that are ravaging parts of California's wine region. A state of emergency was declared in northern areas after mass evacuations, with 2,000 structures destroyed. About 20,000 people fled from Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties in response to some the state's worst-ever wildfires. Such fires are more common in southern California but a combination of dry weather and strong winds has fuelled the destruction in the north.


Fifteen fires were burning across eight Californian counties

Cal Fire officials said on Tuesday morning that 17 wildfires in nine counties have burned more than 115,000 acres in just the past 12 hours. "These fires have destroyed structures and continue to threaten thousands of homes, necessitating the evacuation of thousands of residents," Governor Jerry Brown said. President Donald Trump has approved a disaster declaration for the fire-ravaged state, allowing federal emergency aid to be sent. There is little sign the weather in the coming days will bring much relief to firefighters, BBC Weather says. More tinder dry conditions are forecast, with no rain expected. Meanwhile, in southern California, a separate wildfire burnt 24 homes or other buildings in the wealthy Anaheim Hills area of Orange County, forcing thousands of residents to evacuate.


What do we know of the loss of life and damage?

The fires - considered among the deadliest in state history - have sent smoke as far south as San Francisco, located about 60 miles (96km) away. A new fire is reportedly burning near the Oakmont area of Santa Rosa, a city that has already been devastated by the blazes. Hundreds of homes have been destroyed in the city by flames so hot that glass melted on cars. Details of how the seven people died in Sonoma were not immediately available, but country sheriff Rob Giordano said he expected the death toll to rise. "There is a lot of burned homes and a lot of burned areas, so it's just logical that we're gonna find more people," he said. Two people also died in Napa county and one in Mendocino county when thousands of acres burned in one valley.


Sonoma County officials said they had received more than 150 missing-person reports by Tuesday. Authorities said they have found a few of the missing persons but most of the reports were still under investigation, Sonoma County spokesman Scott Alonso said. Dozens of vineyard workers were reportedly airlifted to safety overnight. Wineries belonging to the rich and famous were abandoned. One belonging to musician Dave Matthews was closed and at risk of being burned to the ground, staff said, as was the nearby Francis Ford Coppola Winery. The vine harvest is already under way and many of the grapes have been picked.

Why did the fires spread so fast?
See also:

Wildfires cause 'dark' skies at California Disneyland
Tue, 10 Oct 2017 - Visitors to the theme park witness eerie orange vistas and ash clouds from nearby wildfires.
Quote:
The Disneyland theme park in southern California is Halloween-themed for the duration of October. However, as wildfires rage in the Californian countryside surrounding the park, visitors are posting images of "surreal" orange skies and ash clouds. Nate Griffey is an annual pass holder and visits the park once or twice a week. He snapped the ash "falling all over Disney" on Monday 9 October. Speaking to the BBC, Nate said: "You did have to watch out so you didn't get ashes in your eye and make sure you didn't inhale."


Jennifer Barnych posted photos to social media saying "the sky keeps getting darker here." On seeing the photos of ominous ash-clouds, one person on Twitter asked "Is the world ending or something?" The park is close to the community of Anaheim Hills, where thousands of residents have been evacuated as wildfires spread through the area. Rachel Serfati posted photos to social media with the caption "no filter used whatsoever". Andrew Veis was visiting the park on Monday with his wife and two-year-old son. He told the BBC: "It was surreal and spooky. The skies looked apocalyptic almost. "Our thoughts are with the brave first responders and the families who are in danger."

Wildfires cause 'dark' skies at California Disneyland - BBC News
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Old 10-13-2017, 02:05 AM
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Exclamation Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Fiery conflagrations in California...

California wildfires: Death toll climbs to 31
Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - The fires raging across northern wine counties are now the state's deadliest in 84 years.
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The number of people confirmed dead in wildfires sweeping northern California has climbed to 31, as officials warned that conditions would worsen. Hundreds of people remain missing as at least 22 fires rampaged across the state's famous wine country. More than 8,000 firefighters are now battling the flames. The wildfires have destroyed more than 3,500 buildings and homes over 170,000 acres (68,800 hectares) and displaced about 25,000 people. Seventeen people are now confirmed killed in Sonoma County, with another eight in Mendocino County, four in Yuba County and two in Napa County, officials said. The updated casualty figures mean the wildfires are the deadliest in California since 1933, when 29 people died in fires at Griffith Park in Los Angeles.



Strong winds that have fanned the flames eased in recent days, but forecasters warned they were set to pick up again on Friday night. "We are not even close to being out of this emergency," Mark Ghilarducci, state director of emergency services, told reporters. State fire chief Ken Pimlott warned of "erratic, shifting winds all weekend". Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said recovery teams with cadaver dogs were searching the smouldering ruins of homes. "We have found bodies that were completely intact, and we have found bodies that were no more than ash and bone," he said.


Only chimneys remain standing in fire-ravaged districts of Santa Rosa

It is not yet clear what started the fires on Sunday night, but officials say power lines blown over by strong winds could be the cause. One of the greatest threats to life is believed to be around the town of Calistoga, Napa County, where the entire population of 5,000 has been ordered to evacuate. Geyserville, a town of around 800 people, and the community of Boyes Hot Springs, both in Sonoma, were also evacuated. The huge fires have sent smoke and ash over San Francisco, about 50 miles away, and over some towns and cities even further south. At least 13 Napa Valley wineries have been destroyed, a vintners' trade group says.


Map showing active wildfires in California

Cannabis plantations in fire-scorched Mendocino County could lose millions as many are uninsured, according to Nikki Lastreto of the local industry association. Marijuana farmers cannot insure their businesses since federal law bans the drug. Though recreational cannabis was legalised in the state in 2016, California's retail market does not open until next January.

California wildfires: Death toll climbs to 31 - BBC News
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Death toll from California wildfire rises, search begins
- The death toll in the disastrous California wildfire great to 31 late on Thursday, even as weary fire crews began making progress against a firestorm.
Quote:
The fire has been spreading dramatically over the last few days and rescuers are now conducting a grim search for bodies amid the ashes of burned communities. In a press conference late on Thursday, Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano told reporters that a 15th person was found dead in his county. He said that search crews and cadaver dogs began sifting through debris for the first time on the day. Later in the day, officials confirmed the discovery of four more bodies. According to Sonoma County, Cal Fire and Yuba County officials, overall a total of 31 deaths have been reported, 15 in Sonoma County, eight in Mendocino County, four in Yuba County and two in Napa County.

At the briefing Giordano said that the searches could take hours, and identification will be difficult. He said, “So far, in the recoveries, we have found bodies that were almost completely intact and bodies that were nothing more than ash and bone.” He added that in the latter cases, sometimes the only way to identify someone is through a medical device, like an ID number with a metal hip replacement. Giordano said, “We will do everything in our power to locate all the missing persons, and I promise you we will handle the remains with care and get them returned to their loved ones. It could be weeks or even months before all the bodies are identified.”


Meanwhile, state and local officials expressed optimism that milder-than-expected winds and additional firefighting crews from across California were allowing them to make progress against the fires. Santa Rosa Fire Chief Tom Gossner said that hundreds of firefighters were battling the devastating Tubbs fire in Santa Rosa and added, “We need to hit this thing hard and get it done. It’s time to finish this thing.” According to Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey, as of Thursday, staff estimated 2,834 homes were destroyed in the city of Santa Rosa alone. Coursey said that about 400,000 square feet of commercial space was burnt too. Officials also added that the flames had destroyed the city’s newest fire station, on Fountaingrove Parkway.

Cal Fire spokeswoman Heather Williams has said that there is still concern for Calistoga and elsewhere. Officials are expecting winds between 10 mph and 20 mph on Thursday night, and stronger seasonal winds over the weekend. Meanwhile, the fire around Mt. St. Helena hopped Highway 29, which runs adjacent to the mountain north of evacuated Calistoga. Amy Head, a Cal Fire spokeswoman said, "It's so thick [with vegetation], it's so steep. The fire is unpredictable. We don't want to get trapped on this mountain." Further, crews have managed to start a containment line for the 43,000-acre Atlas fire. Residents have been warned that they might have to evacuate eastern sections of town closest to the fire.

http://www.bignewsnetwork.com/news/2...-search-begins
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Horrifying Drone Footage Shows Wildfire Devastation In Santa Rosa
October 11, 2017 - Wildfires have turned entire neighborhoods in Santa Rosa, California, to ash, according to drone footage The Association Press posted Tuesday.
Quote:
The video shows still-smoldering homes burned to their foundations, blackened trees, and cars that look like they were destroyed in warfare. Standing out in the rubble are the charred skeletons of refrigerators, patio furniture and barbeque pits.


Firefighters continue to battle at least 22 large wildfires across multiple counties, and are preparing for winds to make conditions even worse. The blazes have already burned some 117,000 acres, destroyed about 3,500 structures and triggered mass evacuations. At least 21 people have been killed.

The Tubbs Fire in particular ripped through residential areas of Santa Rosa late Sunday and early Monday. As of Wednesday, it alone had burned 28,000 acres and killed at least 11 people, making it the sixth-deadliest fire in California’s history, according to officials. Gov. Jerry Brown (D) has declared a state of emergency for Napa, Sonoma, Yuba Butte, Lake and Mendocino counties.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/horrifyin...183935269.html

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Unhappy Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

WWII vet and wife lost in California wildfire...

100-yr-old WWII Vet, 98-yr-old Wife Killed in California Wildfire
11 Oct 2017 | Charles and Sara Rippey met in grade school and had been married for 75 years.
Quote:
Mike Rippey stood among pieces of metal, porcelain and other remnants of the California home where his 100-year-old father and 98-year-old mother had died in the raging wine country wildfires. Rippey said Tuesday his brother had discovered their bodies after driving to the home and managing to get past security. He said his father Charles appeared to be heading to the room of his mother, Sara, when he was overcome by the smoke and flames. "My father certainly wouldn't have left her," Mike Rippey said. The couple had met in grade school in Wisconsin and been together ever since, celebrating their 75th anniversary last year. Rippey, 71, said he and his siblings couldn't imagine how either parent would have navigated life if just one had survived the flames. "We knew there's no way they would ever be happy, whoever was the last one. So they went together, and that's the way it worked," he said stoically.


Charles and Sara Rippey. Charles, 100, and Sara, 98, were unable to leave their Napa, Calif., home, and died when the Tubbs fire swept through.

In the charred remains of the home, only metal and porcelain survived to testify to the couple's long life together. There were coffee cups along a low sill; two metal chairs, side-by-side by a patio table; and a porcelain tea set of white and soft washes of blue, some pieces still intact. Charles Rippey — nicknamed "Peach" as a toddler for his chubby cheeks — and his wife were among the 17 victims who have died in the fierce, fast-moving fires that started on Sunday and raged through neighborhoods. None of the other victims had been identified. Authorities are expecting other older people to be among the dead, who like the Rippeys might not have been able to move fast enough to beat the flames. Mike Rippey said his mother had previously suffered a stroke. Seventeen wildfires raging across parts of seven counties have destroyed more than 2,000 homes, businesses and other structures.


Chuck Rippey looks over a cup found in the burned out remains of his parent's home at the Silverado Resort, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017, in Napa, Calif. Charles Rippey, 100 and his wife Sara, 98, died when wind whipped flames swept their home.

The wildfires rank among the five deadliest in California history, and officials expect the death toll to rise as the scope of destruction becomes clear. At least 185 people were injured, and nearly 200 have been reported missing in Sonoma County alone, though many may be safe but unable to use damaged communication systems. Mike Rippey was in London and boarding a flight to California when his brother called and told him their parents had died. The couple attended the University of Wisconsin and married in 1942 before Charles Rippey served as a U.S. Army engineer in World War II. He became an executive with the Firestone tire company. Rippey said he had no plans to rebuild the home. "Without them, it doesn't mean a thing," he said. "It's gone. They're gone."

100-yr-old WWII Vet, 98-yr-old Wife Killed in California Wildfire | Military.com
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Group Seeks to Name Navy Ship for Iwo Jima Photographer
9 Oct 2017 | Veterans have launched a longshot petition to the U.S. Navy asking that a warship be named for AP photographer Joe Rosenthal.
Quote:
The iconic image of six Marines raising an American flag over Iwo Jima on Feb. 23, 1945, is recognized around the world, credited with boosting morale at a critical moment of World War II, and generating record fundraising for war relief at home. It's also the first photograph to win the Pulitzer Prize in the same year it was taken. After 72 years, though, some worry that the man who made it, Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal, may fade from American memory. A group of veterans and photographers want to avoid that with their longshot petition to the U.S. Navy asking that a warship be named for him. Rosenthal had requested the dangerous wartime assignment after he was rejected for service because of poor eyesight.

After photographing the fighting on Guam, Peleliu and Angaur, he nearly drowned en route to Iwo Jima as he transferred from the command ship El Dorado to an amphibious landing craft the day he took the photograph. All accounts paint Rosenthal as a hands-on practitioner of his craft, not content to sit on a ship and take photos from afar. "He was a 33-year-old man basically volunteering for combat and not carrying a weapon, but carrying his camera," said Tom Graves, chapter historian of the USMC Combat Correspondents Association in the San Francisco Bay Area. "He was exposed to great danger and in fact, was nearly killed several times."


FILE - In this Feb 23, 1945 file photo, U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise the American flag atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima, Japan.

After coming ashore in Iwo Jima, Rosenthal and others learned an American flag had made it to Mount Suribachi, a volcanic cone at the southwestern tip of the island and a key objective of the Marines. Unfortunately, another photographer had already captured that image. "I wanted a flag going up on Iwo, and I want it badly," Rosenthal later recalled. When he learned that a second, much larger flag was on its way to the site, he began mentally composing what would become his iconic photo: Where would the men be? Where would the flag be? How tall would it be?

He built a platform of stones and sandbags to stand on, adjusted his shutter timing and tuned his aperture. It was about noon, with the sun directly overhead and a strong wind. "I see what had to be gone through before those Marines, with that flag, or with any flag, got up to the top of that mountain and secured the highest point, the most important point, perhaps, in the entire battle, the most important ground to be taken by those Marines," Rosenthal said in a 1997 interview. AP photo editor Jack Bodkin was the first to see Rosenthal's picture of six Marines raising the American flag on Mount Suribachi. "Here's one for all time," he declared as he sent the image by Navy radio to San Francisco. The image moved on Feb. 24 and appeared in newspapers on Sunday morning, 17½ hours after it was taken. The accolades poured in.

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Old 10-14-2017, 10:29 AM
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Default Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

Next up in CA is the rainy season.
After the fires, there isn't plant life to hold the dirt steady.
Mudslides are coming.
Typical CA seasonal weather pattern.
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:22 PM
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Default Re: 2017 Wildfire Season

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Originally Posted by Bat View Post
Next up in CA is the rainy season.
After the fires, there isn't plant life to hold the dirt steady.
Mudslides are coming.
Typical CA seasonal weather pattern.




And as these seasons grow worst each year it is possible there won't be much left to burn or to bring the foundation down.

Best sell Ca., back to Mexico while we can...
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