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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss Walt's Environmental News at the General Discussion; Granny wonderin' if it'll get cold enough to snow in August?... Spectators Gear Up in US for Coast-to-coast Solar Eclipse ...

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Old 06-24-2017, 09:16 AM
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Granny wonderin' if it'll get cold enough to snow in August?...

Spectators Gear Up in US for Coast-to-coast Solar Eclipse
June 21, 2017 — The first total solar eclipse across the continental United States in a century is expected to spark watching parties and traffic jams as it darkens skies from Oregon to South Carolina, authorities said Wednesday.
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During the August 21 eclipse, the moon will pass between the sun and Earth, blocking the face of the sun and leaving only its outer atmosphere, or corona, visible in the sky. It will be the first coast-to-coast total eclipse since 1918. Weather permitting, people can watch as the moon's 70-mile-wide (113 kilometers) shadow crosses through 14 states from 10:15 a.m. PDT (1715 GMT) around Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to 2:49 p.m. EDT (1849 GMT) in McClellanville, South Carolina.

'Be prepared'

With 200 million Americans within a day's drive of the path, national parks and highways officials are bracing for a travel surge. "Be prepared," Martin Knopp of the Federal Highway Administration said at a news conference, cautioning drivers against simply showing up. "It's not the time to pull over and be on the side of the road." Travel groups and many scientists will be heading to Oregon's northwest desert seeking favorable weather for viewing, according to the website eclipsophile.com.


A solar eclipse is seen from the beach of Ternate island, Indonesia

Total solar eclipses occur somewhere on Earth every year or so, but most cast their shadows over oceans or remote land. The last total eclipse over part of the contiguous U.S. was in 1979. All of North America will experience a partial eclipse, though the difference between a full and partial eclipse is "literally the difference between night and day," said astronomer Rick Fienberg of the American Astronomical Society.

Temperature drop

He noted that even a 99 percent eclipse will not reveal the sun's corona. And during a total eclipse, the temperature drops and the horizon is ringed by the colors of sunset. "The sky gets deep twilight blue and bright stars and planets come out," Fienberg said. "Animals and birds behave strangely, like it's the end of the day."


A partial solar eclipse occurs March 9, 2016, as seen from Taguig city, east of Manila, Philippines.

NASA said it plans to fly high-altitude research balloons and airplanes for solar physics and other experiments. Nearly a dozen U.S. science satellites will observe the sun and Earth. The U.S. space agency will also broadcast the eclipse live from locations along the path. Experts caution that the only safe time to look at the sun without special eclipse glasses is during totality when the surface of the sun is completely blocked by the moon.

https://www.voanews.com/a/spectators...e/3910997.html
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Solar Eclipse Mania Spurs US Festivals, Tours, Sold-out Hotels
April 04, 2017 - Get ready for solar eclipse mania. Destinations in the path of the Aug. 21 eclipse, which will be visible in the U.S. along a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina, are going wild with plans for festivals, concerts and viewing parties.
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Hotels in Casper, Wyoming, are charging five times their usual rates. Rooms at Idaho's Sun Valley Resort have been booked for years. An eclipse tour in Tennessee's Great Smoky Mountains National Park sold out in 10 minutes. The Smokies are among 20 National Park sites that will experience the total solar eclipse, from sections of the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina to Wyoming's Grand Tetons. "We are expecting record visitation,'' said NPS spokesman Jeffrey Olson.


The annular solar eclipse is seen as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains from downtown Denver, Colorado

Hopkinsville, Kentucky, population 32,000, and Carbondale, Illinois, population 23,000, expect 50,000 visitors each. The destinations, 140 miles apart, will experience about 2 minutes and 40 seconds of total darkness, among eclipse sites with the longest duration. Events in the region include an "Eclipse Con'' festival, concerts and tailgate parties. South Carolina's Clemson University also expects 50,000 people at a campus event that will feature astronomers and other experts. Twenty thousand people will gather in the Ochocho National Forest for Oregon Eclipse 2017, with music, yoga, theater, art installations and more. Wind River Reservation in Wyoming hosts "bring back the sun'' ceremonies. A Pink Floyd Tribute band plans a "Dark Side of the Moon'' concert in Jefferson City, Missouri. The South Carolina Philharmonic in Columbia offers "Star Wars Musiclipse.'' Sylva, North Carolina, has a "Moonlight Madness'' run.

Eclipse Chasers

Sharon Hahs and her husband, Billy, have chased 14 eclipses around the world from Mongolia to South Africa. They'll see this one from a family farm in Missouri, not far from their St. Louis home. "There is nothing else in our universe that looks like a total solar eclipse,'' said Hahs. "The air gets cool. You have 360-degree dusk. Nature sounds really happen: the cock crows, birds get quiet. We even had a horse cross our viewing area to return to the stable.''


People view an annular solar eclipse as they look towards the setting sun on the horizon in Phoenix, Arizona

Michael Allen of Southampton, England, is a "keen amateur astronomer'' who considers the eclipse "a once in a lifetime opportunity.'' He can't travel alone because he has cerebral palsy and epilepsy, so his brother Nick is accompanying him on a three-day tour to Nashville with eclipse-viewing at the Kentucky border. Jack Bohannon of Anchorage, Alaska, plans to see the eclipse in Nebraska as the "culmination of a summer-long RV trip'' with family. "We were originally going to book an RV park in the eclipse path in Wyoming, but everywhere was full,'' he said.

Hotels

In small or remote destinations, hotels and campsites in the path of totality are completely sold out. But bigger cities still have openings. As of March 25, Nashville hotels were only 54 percent booked. Don't assume lodging is sold out because a travel booking site says so. Call hotels directly to ask. Many hotels are offering eclipse packages. Nashville's Loews Vanderbilt package includes eclipse viewing glasses, commemorative T-shirt, Uber gift card and bar credit. Hotel Jackson in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, has an "eclipse concierge'' to help guests plan their $699-a-night stay. Consumers in Oregon have complained about hotels canceling reservations they made long ago, claiming rebranding or new ownership, then charging much higher rates for rebooking.

Location and Weather
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Last edited by waltky; 06-24-2017 at 09:23 AM..
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Old 06-24-2017, 12:41 PM
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Deadly landslide in China...

China landslide leaves 120 missing in Sichuan
Sat, 24 Jun 2017 : A frantic rescue operation continues in Sichuan province, with 15 bodies recovered so far.
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More than 120 people are missing after a landslide in Sichuan province in south-western China, state media say. About 40 homes were destroyed in Xinmo village in Maoxian county, after the side of a mountain collapsed at about 06:00 local time (22:00 GMT Friday). Rescue teams are frantically searching for survivors trapped beneath rocks dislodged by heavy rainfall. The bodies of 15 people have so far been found. President Xi Jinping urged rescuers to "spare no effort".


A couple and a baby were rescued and taken to hospital after teams of workers used ropes to move large rocks, AFP news agency reports, citing local authorities. Qiao Dashuai told CCTV the baby had woken them and when they came to the door of their home they were swept away by water. He said his parents and other relatives were still missing. An earlier toll of 141 missing people has now been revised down by state media. The landslide blocked a 2km (1.2-mile) stretch of a river, Xinhua news agency reported. Local police told state broadcaster CCTV a lack of vegetation in the area had made the landslide worse.


Rescue workers are frantically searching for survivors feared buried beneath rocks

Local officials said some 8m cu m (282m cu ft) of rock had been dislodged. Roads in the county were closed on Saturday to all traffic except emergency services, the news agency said. Landslides are a regular danger in mountainous regions of China, especially during heavy rains. In 2008, 87,000 people were killed when an earthquake struck Wenchuan county in Sichuan province. In Maoxian county itself, 37 tourists were killed when their coach was buried in a landslide caused by the earthquake.

China landslide leaves 120 missing in Sichuan - BBC News
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Over 120 people buried by massive southwest China landslide
Jun 24,`17 -- More than 120 people were buried by a landslide that caused huge rocks and a mass of earth to come crashing into their homes in a mountain village in southwestern China early Saturday, officials said.
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The landslide, which came from a mountain, engulfed a cluster of 62 homes and a hotel in the village of Xinmo in Mao County at about 6 a.m., the Sichuan provincial government said. Officials said 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) of road were buried in the disaster. "It's the biggest landslide to hit this area since the Wenchuan earthquake," Wang Yongbo, an official leading one of the rescue efforts, told state broadcaster China Central Television. Wang was referring to China's deadliest earthquake this century, a magnitude 7.9 temblor that struck Sichuan province in May 2008, killing nearly 90,000 people. The provincial government said more than 120 people were buried by the landslide. CCTV cited a rescuer as saying five bodies had been found.


Bulldozers were used to help move large boulders after homes were destroyed

Rescuers pulled out three people, two of whom had survived, the official Sichuan Daily newspaper said on its microblog. The paper also said a family of three, including a month-old baby, managed to escape just as the landslide started to hit their house. Qiao Dashuai told CCTV that the baby saved the family because he was woken up by the child's crying and was going to change the baby's diaper when he heard a noise that alerted him to the landslide. "We heard a strange noise at the back of our house, and it was rather loud," Qiao said. "Wind was coming into the room so I wanted to close the door. When we came out, water flow swept us away instantly." He said they struggled against the flood of water until they met medical workers who took them to a hospital. Qiao said his parents and other relatives had not been found.


Medical staff joined the search in the hope of assisting any survivors

Mao County, or Maoxian, sits on the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and is home to about 110,000 people, according to the government's website. Most residents are of the Qiang ethnic minority. The village is known locally for tourism, and Chinese reports said it was unclear if tourists were among those buried by the landslide. The landslide blocked a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) section of a river. The provincial government said on its website that an estimated 8 million cubic meters (282 million cubic feet) of earth and rock - equivalent to more than 3,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools - had slid down the mountain. Experts told CCTV that the landslide was likely triggered by rain. A meteorologist interviewed by CCTV said there was light rain in the area that would continue for a few days.

The Sichuan Daily said rescuers made contact with a villager buried under the rubble who answered her cellphone when they called and burst into tears. The woman was in the bedroom of her home when the landslide hit the village, and rescuers were trying to reach her, the report said. Search and rescue efforts were underway involving more than 400 workers, including police. CCTV showed footage of rescuers in bright orange uniforms using earth movers and excavators but also relying on ropes to pull at huge rocks and shovels to dig up the dirt. Provincial police sent 500 rescuers with two dozen sniffer dogs to the site, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

News from The Associated Press
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Old 06-30-2017, 09:13 PM
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Granny says, "Dat's right - it says inna Bible it gonna get real hot fer 5 months, den we all gonna die...

Iran's Ahvaz city records 129 degrees, tied for world record for the most extreme high temperature on Earth
Saturday 1st July, 2017 - Setting a new record, Iran’s southwest city of Ahvaz recorded the country’s hottest ever temperature on Thursday afternoon.
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Temperature in the city that houses 1.1 million people, soared to 129 degrees and is said to be tied with the world record for the most extreme high temperature. Experts said that the scorching temperature reading was brought about by a dome of heat centered over the Middle East. The excessively hot air over Ahvaz was said to have felt even more stifling due to high humidity. Readings noted that as the temperature climbed into the high 120s, the dew point, a measure of humidity, peaked in the low 70s; a high level for the desert location. Further, a measure of how hot it feels factoring in the humidity, or the heat index is said to have exceeded 140 degrees. Experts concluded that this combination of heat and humidity was so extreme that it was beyond levels the heat index was designed to compute.

Meanwhile, reports noted that about 800 miles southeast of Ahvaz, in the Persian Gulf city of Jask - the humidity was even more suffocating. According to reports, the highest dew point ever measured on Earth is 95 degrees set at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, on July 8, 2003. On Wednesday morning, the dew point hit 91.4 degrees in the area. According to a weather historian for Weather Underground, Christopher Burt, who has exhaustively analyzed world temperature extremes has determined that the highest records in modern times were recorded at Mitribah in Kuwait, on July 21, 2016 - with a reading of 129.2 degree and at Death Valley in California, on July 10, 1913 - with a reading of 134 degrees. However, the reading at Death Valley was highly criticized by Burt, who argued that it was “essentially not possible from a meteorological perspective,” and that the weather observer then had committed errors. The two readings are said to be the hottest credible temperature measurements that exist in modern records.


On Thursday, Etienne Kapikian, a forecaster at French meteorological agency MeteoFrance, said on Twitter that the city of Ahvaz soared to “53.7°C” (128.7 degrees Fahrenheit). Kapikian said the temperature is a “new absolute national record of reliable Iranian heat” and that it was the hottest temperature ever recorded in June over mainland Asia. Previously, Iran’s hottest temperature was recorded at 127.4. However, the Weather Underground website indicated that temperature in Ahvaz climbed even higher, hitting 129.2 degrees at both 4:51 and 5 p.m. local time. Experts noted that if the 129.2 degrees reading is accurate, it would arguably tie the hottest temperature ever measured on Earth in modern times.

Now, the World Meteorological Organization will review the 129.2 degree-reading that Ahvaz posted on Weather Underground in a bid to stand and match the highest modern global temperature. The Iranian temperature extremes came just a month after several locations in the Middle East recorded their hottest May temperatures during another exceptional heat wave. According to a report published by the National Academy of Sciences in 2016, worsening heat waves are among the weather events that can be most easily connected to human-caused climate change. Further, a study published in the journal Nature Climate change in 2015 had cautioned that by the end of the century, due to climate change, temperatures in the Middle East may become too hot for human survival.

Irans Ahvaz city records 129 degrees tied for world record for the most extreme high temperature on Earth
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Old 07-06-2017, 07:38 AM
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Rising waters threaten Louisiana way of life...

Rising waters threaten Louisiana culture
Thu, Jul 06, 2017 - Louise St Pierre paints pictures of shacks and swamps on the insides of oyster shells — tiny scenes of Cajun culture she sees washing away amid the rising saltwater and periodic floods inundating southern Louisiana. “Our culture is dying,” said St Pierre, who lives in Lafourche Parish, where cypress trees are hung with lacy strands of Spanish moss and alligators lurk in bayous, the region’s slow-moving swamp waterways. “It’s not like it was,” she said.
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People are moving away from the parish, about 97km southwest of New Orleans, faced with growing flood risks and unable to pay for insurance, which can reach thousands of dollars and is required by mortgage banks in high-risk areas. Since Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, nearly 10 percent of Lafourche’s population has left its southernmost end that is flood-prone and vulnerable to storm surges. Attrition due to soaring insurance premiums is visible from the proliferation of “For Sale” signs on houses and boats, said Gary LaFleur, a biologist and faculty member at the Center for Bayou Studies at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux. “No government is coming in and kicking people out, but all of a sudden the insurance rates are going up so high that it’s like a slow economic way of leading to a ghost town,” he told reporters. “Within 50 years the town is gone.”

Lafourche has been home for centuries to Cajuns who are descended from French-speaking settlers expelled in the 18th century from what is now Canada. Cajun culture is renowned for its spicy cuisine and lively traditional music. “It’s a lifestyle, people, language — just the way you were brought up by your parents and grandparents,” St Pierre said. Traditions such as the blessing of the fleets in the bayous — once an annual ceremony for shrimpers and others — are dimming as the ranks of family-owned fishing boats dwindle, he said. “When you see one shrimp boat and it’s followed by five party boats, you think, aww, this isn’t as cool as it used to be,” he said.

St Pierre, known as Ms Louise, sells her miniature Cajun paintings to customers at craft shows. “They can send them to their nephew in New York and say, ‘Hey, that is a part of our culture. Don’t forget,’” she said. St Pierre, 65, learned French from her grandparents and meets each Tuesday night with fellow francophones, whose numbers are falling. Fewer than 14,000 people in Lafourche are native French speakers, according to the latest census figures, down from some 16,000 a decade earlier. St Pierre also cooks a mean Cajun meal. “I can make you gumbo and jambalaya, and do your etouffees and of course boiled shrimp and crawfish, fried oysters,” she said. “And I love alligator tails.”

However, oyster beds were hit hard by the massive BP oil spill in 2010, crabs are under pressure from wetland loss and cheap foreign imports have depressed local seafood prices. Added to that, saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico is killing vegetation where rabbit, deer and other Cajun delicacies used to thrive, she said. Towns such as Leeville, once a vibrant fishing center, are under threat. The main artery was elevated to a causeway to avoid rising water, so the road that went through downtown now goes overhead, LaFleur said. “Leeville didn’t get washed away, but because they had to raise the road, now people just don’t go to Leeville anymore,” he said. “That’s kind of killing that community right there.”

Locals also worry about a loss of federal funding to protect the coast, advocated by US President Donald Trump’s administration. Under the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA), four states, including Louisiana, get nearly 40 percent of federal oil revenue from drilling off their coasts. Louisiana officials have said the state could see as much as US$140 million of GOMESA money for coastal restoration in a year. However, Trump’s proposed budget would divert that cash to the US Treasury. Former US PResident Barack Obama’s administration also sought to divert GOMESA funding but was blocked by US Congress. “If we don’t get that money this year, you can just kiss everything goodbye,” St Pierre said.

Source
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:18 PM
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Upside to climate change...

Researchers: Climate Change May Turn Africa's Arid Sahel Green
July 05, 2017 — One of Africa's driest regions — the Sahel — could turn greener if the planet warms more than 2 degrees Celsius and triggers more frequent heavy rainfall, scientists said on Wednesday.
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The Sahel stretches coast to coast from Mauritania and Mali in the west to Sudan and Eritrea in the east, and skirts the southern edge of the Sahara desert. It is home to more than 100 million people. The region has seen worsening extreme weather — including more frequent droughts — in recent years. But if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, the resulting global warming — of more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels — could change major weather patterns in the Sahel, and in many different parts of the world, scientists say.

Rainfall models vary

Some weather models predict a small increase in rainfall for the Sahel, but there is a risk that the entire weather pattern will change by the end of the century, researchers at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) said.[ “The sheer size of the possible change is mindboggling — this is one of the very few elements in the Earth system that we might witness tipping soon,” said co-author Anders Levermann from PIK and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of New York's Columbia University. If the Sahel becomes much rainier, it will mean more water for agriculture, industry and domestic use. But in the first few years of the transition, people are likely to experience very erratic weather — extreme droughts followed by destructive floods, the researchers said.


A boy drives a donkey to pull water up from a well outside Louri village in Chad in the Sahel.

Hard for people to plan

​This level of unpredictability makes it very hard for people to plan for coming changes, they said. “The enormous change that we might see would clearly pose a huge adaptation challenge to the Sahel,” said Levermann. “More than 100 million people are potentially affected that already now are confronted with a (multitude) of instabilities, including war,” he said. The region faces a range of conflicts, including some driven by groups such as Boko Haram and al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb. The researchers studied rainfall patterns in the months of July, August and September when the region receives most of its annual rain.

'A range of possible outcomes'

“There's a range of possible outcomes for societies in the Sahel which depend on the climate that eventually (develops) … and whether they are prepared for fluctuations,” lead author Jacob Schewe, from PIK, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Climate change from burning fossil fuels “really has the power to shake things up,” he said. “It is driving risks for crop yields in many regions and generally increases dangerous weather extremes around the globe,” he added. The study was published on Wednesday in Earth System Dynamics, a journal of the European Geosciences Union.

https://www.voanews.com/a/researcher...n/3930013.html
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Old 08-04-2017, 11:11 PM
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Finding methane gas leaks with Google Street View Maps...

Google Street View Cars Map Methane Leaks
August 03, 2017 — Finding underground gas leaks is now as easy as finding a McDonalds, thanks to a combination of Google Street View cars, mobile methane detectors, some major computing power and a lot of ingenuity.
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When a city’s underground gas lines leak, they waste fuel and release invisible plumes of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. To find and measure leaks, Colorado State University biologist Joe von Fischer decided to create "methane maps," to make it easier for utilities to identify the biggest leaks, and repair them. “That’s where you get the greatest bang for the buck," he pointed out, "the greatest pollution reductions per repair.” Knowing that Google Maps start with Google Street View cars recording everything they drive by, along with their GPS locations, von Fischer’s team thought they would just add methane detectors to a Street View car. It turned out, it was not that simple.

"Squirrelly objects"

The world’s best methane detectors are accurate in an area the size of a teacup, but methane leaks can be wider than a street. Also, no one had ever measured the size of a methane leak from a moving car. "If you’ve ever seen a plume of smoke, it’s sort of a lumpy, irregular object," von Fischer said. "Methane plumes as they come out of the ground are the same, they’re lumpy squirrelly objects.”


This portable methane analyzer uses laser-based technology to measure atmospheric methane concentrations, the same technology used in the analyzers that are deployed on the Google Street View cars.

The team had to develop a way to capture data about those plumes, one that would be accurate in the real world. They set up a test site in an abandoned airfield near campus, and brought in what looked like a large scuba tank filled with methane and some air hoses. Then they released carefully measured methane through the hose as von Fischer drove a specially equipped SUV past it, again and again. They compared readings from the methane detectors in the SUV to readings from the tank. “We spend a lot of time driving through the plumes to sort of calibrate the way that those cars see methane plumes that form as methane’s being emitted from the ground,” von Fischer explained. With that understanding, the methane detectors hit the road.

Turning data into maps

But the results created pages of data, "more than 30 million points,” said CSU computer scientist Johnson Kathkikiaran. He knew that all those data points alone would never help people find the biggest leaks on any map. So he and his advisor, Sanmi Peracara, turned the data into pictures using tools from Google. Their visual summaries made it easy for utility experts to analyze the methane maps, but von Fischer wanted anyone to be able to identify the worst leaks. His teammates at the Environmental Defense Fund met that challenge by incorporating the data into their online maps. Yellow dots indicate a small methane leak. Orange is a medium-size one. Red means a big leak - as much pollution as one car driving 14,000 kilometers in a single day.


Colored circles on the methane maps indicate the size of the detected gas leak.

Von Fischer says that if a city focuses on these biggest leaks, repairing just 8 percent of them can reduce methane pollution by a third. “That becomes a win-win type scenario," he said, "because we’re not asking polluters to fix everything, but we’re looking for a reduction in overall emissions, and I think we can achieve that in a more cost effective way.” After analyzing a methane map for the state of New Jersey, for example, the utility PSE&G has prioritized fixing its leakiest pipes there first, to speed the reduction of their overall pollution. “To me that was a real victory, to be able to help the utility find which parts were leakiest, and to make a cost effective reduction in their overall emissions," von Fishcher said. Von Fischer envisions even more innovation ahead for mapping many kinds of pollution… to clean the air and save energy.

https://www.voanews.com/a/mapping-me...s/3970924.html
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Old 09-11-2017, 01:26 AM
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Can we afford to with the damage of two hurricanes?...

Will the U.S. help after Mexico's most powerful earthquake in a century?
September 8, 2017 • In the short time between the immense flooding in Texas wrought by Hurricane Harvey and the destruction to come in Florida wrought by Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful earthquakes in Mexico's history rocked the country.
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Mexico City, more than 600 miles away, shook amid the tremors. The death toll has surpassed 30 and continues to climb as Mexico, too, prepares for a hurricane — Katia, Category 2, expected to slam into Mexico's east coast on Saturday. The Mexican government will stretch itself as it tries to ensure the safety of its citizens, and it's perhaps worth wondering whether its neighboring government to the north will lend a hand. The United States, as noted earlier, is handling the aftermath of one unprecedented disaster (Harvey) while trying to ready itself for yet another potentially unprecedented disaster (Irma). It, too, will stretch itself ying to ensure the safety of its citizens.

But in the wake of Harvey's catastrophic flooding, the Mexican government offered its assistance to Texas even while President Donald Trump again insisted Mexico would pay for his wall along the border between the two countries. On Aug. 27, the Mexican Secretary of Foreign Relations office released a statement rebuking Trump, but concluded by offering help to anyone in the U.S. reeling from Harvey: "The Government of Mexico takes this opportunity to express its full solidarity with the people and government of the United States for the damages caused by Hurricane Harvey in Texas, and reports that we have offered the US government all the help and cooperation that can be provided by the different Mexican government agencies to deal with the impacts of this natural disaster, as must good neighbors in times of difficulty."


The Mexican government, in contact with the State Department and the government of Texas, reportedly offered to help residents affected by Harvey in the same way the nation's government helped victims of Hurricane Katrina, which rocked Louisiana and other states in 2005. Texas Governor Greg Abbott accepted the offer. Following Katrina, Mexican soldiers found themselves on U.S. soil for the first time in more than 150 years. They stayed for three weeks in Louisiana and Mississippi, according to The Washington Post, where they delivered about 184,000 tons of supplies, and around 170,000 meals.

A State Department spokesperson wrote in an email that Mexico hasn't requested aid following the earthquake, but that the U.S. government is "in close contact with Mexican authorities as we monitor the situation." "In addition to Mexico, we are monitoring the situation in Guatemala and El Salvador closely regarding earthquake and tsunami-related impacts," the spokesperson wrote. Trump has so far not publicly spoken about potential aid to Mexico, and, yes, that means no tweets, either. President of Mexico Enrique Peña Nieto, however, tweeted his thanks to friendly nations and leaders for their solidarity and support. Maybe that tweet is genuine. Maybe it's a subtweet. Maybe both.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/u-help-me...231608450.html
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