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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss Global Pollution at the General Discussion; Pollution is everywhere, including the deepest parts of the oceans... Toxic, Man-made Pollutants Found in Deepest Oceans February 13, 2017 ...

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Old 02-14-2017, 03:39 AM
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Pollution is everywhere, including the deepest parts of the oceans...

Toxic, Man-made Pollutants Found in Deepest Oceans
February 13, 2017 - No place is safe from pollution, including the deepest parts of the oceans.
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Writing in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom say small creatures called amphipods that live in the Mariana and Kermadec trenches, both of which are more than 10 kilometers deep, have “extremely high levels” of man-made toxic chemicals in their fatty tissues. The chemicals, called Persistent Organic Pollutants, include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). PCBs were produced from the 1930s through the 1970s when they were outlawed. But researchers estimate 1.3 million tonnes of PCBs were produced worldwide.


Hirondellea gigas are voracious scavengers that consume anything that comes down from the surface.

They entered the environment through “industrial accidents and discharges and leakage from landfills.” Furthermore, they are “invulnerable to natural degradation” so can last for decades. “We still think of the deep ocean as being this remote and pristine realm, safe from human impact, but our research shows that, sadly, this could not be further from the truth, said lead researcher, Alan Jamieson. “In fact, the amphipods we sampled contained levels of contamination similar to that found in Japan's Suruga Bay, one of the most polluted industrial zones of the northwest Pacific.” To reach their conclusions, researchers used deep-sea landers to bring organism samples up from the trenches, which are 7,000 kilometers apart.

The pollutants, according to Jamieson, likely sank to the bottom of the ocean through contaminated plastic garbage as well as dead animals that drifted to the bottom and were eaten by the amphipods. Amphipods with toxic chemicals are then eaten by bigger organisms as the pollutants make their way back into the food chain. “The fact that we found such extraordinary levels of these pollutants in one of the most remote and inaccessible habitats on earth really brings home the long term, devastating impact that mankind is having on the planet,” said Dr Jamieson. “It’s not a great legacy that we’re leaving behind.”

Toxic, Man-made Pollutants Found in Deepest Oceans
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Old 02-14-2017, 06:17 PM
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Granny says it's from all dem sacred cows fartin' whilst dey roamin' `round...

Report says air pollution in India surpassing China
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 - India’s rapidly worsening air pollution is causing about 1.1 million people to die prematurely each year and is now surpassing China’s as the deadliest in the world, a new study of global air pollution showed.
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The number of premature deaths in China caused by dangerous air particles, known as PM2.5, has stabilized globally in recent years, but has risen sharply in India, according to the report, issued yesterday by the Health Effects Institute — a Boston-based research institute focused on the health effects of air pollution — and the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, a population health research center in Seattle.

India has registered an alarming increase of nearly 50 percent in premature deaths from particulate matter between 1990 and 2015, the report said. “You can almost think of this as the perfect storm for India,” said Michael Brauer, a professor of environment and health relationships at the University of British Columbia and an author of the study, in a telephone interview. Brauer cited the confluence of rapid industrialization, population growth and an aging populace in India that is more susceptible to air pollution.

Pollution levels are worsening in India as it tries to industrialize, but “the idea that policymaking should be led by government is lacking,” said Bhargav Krishna, manager for environmental health at the Public Health Foundation of India, a health policy research center in New Delhi. As air pollution worsened in parts of the world, including South Asia, it improved in the US and Europe, the report said, crediting policies to curb emissions, among other things.

Environmental regulations in the US and action by the European Commission have led to substantial progress in reducing fine particulate pollution since 1990, the report said. The US has experienced a reduction of about 27 percent in the average annual exposure to fine particulate matter, with smaller declines in Europe. However, about 88,000 people in the US and 258,000 in Europe still face increased risks of premature death because of particulate levels, the report said.

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Old 03-07-2017, 02:11 AM
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Global pollution's affect on children...

WHO: Environmental Pollution Kills 1.7M Children Under Five Every Year
March 06, 2017 — Environmental pollution kills more than 1 in 4 children under the age of five every year - that's 1.7 million children worldwide. The World Health Organization warns these child deaths will increase dramatically if action is not taken to reduce environmental risks.
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WHO examines the impact of harmful environments on children’s health and offers solutions in two new studies, “Inheriting a Sustainable World: Atlas on Children’s Health and the Environment” and a companion report, “Don’t pollute my future! The impact of the environment on children’s health.” The authors agree that air pollution is the biggest killer and is responsible for 6.5 million premature deaths every year, including nearly 600,000 deaths among children under age five. Margaret Chan, WHO director-general, notes that young children are most at risk of dying from a polluted environment because of “their developing organs and immune systems, and smaller bodies and airways.”

While most of these child deaths occur in developing countries, Maria Neira, WHO Director, Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health told VOA that air pollution was a big leveler between rich and poor countries. “You can be a very rich child, your parents very rich, but living in a place, in a city, which is very polluted-then there is very little you can do because we all need to breathe. “So, even if you are rich or poor, you still need to breathe and this is very pernicious. Air pollution is everywhere,” she said.


People wear protective masks near the Bund during a polluted day in Shanghai, China

WHO reports the most common causes of death among children aged one month to five years are diarrhea, malaria and pneumonia. “These are very much affected by air pollution, water and sanitation, which is inadequate, but also the disease vectors, mosquitos around the house and the community,” said Annette Pruss-Ustun, scientist in WHO's Public Health and Environmental Department. “These are mainly a problem in low-and-middle-income countries except air pollution, which also children in high income countries are affected by,” she said. “But, there they do not die from it because the health care system takes care of them in time.” WHO reports actions including those of providing safe water and sanitation, limiting exposure to hazardous chemicals, and improving waste management can prevent many environmentally induced deaths.

Maria Neira cited access to clean fuels as one of the most important interventions. “Almost half of the world population is using dirty fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting at home. And, this is affecting very much mothers who are staying and cooking at home, but the children who are around mothers—they are exposed as well.” Neira said that providing clean energy and clean fuels to households will have enormous benefits for the health of the children and others as well.

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Report: Syrian Children Suffering from 'Toxic Stress' Due to War
arch 06, 2017 - Children in Syria are suffering from "toxic stress," a severe form of psychological trauma that can cause life-long damage, according to a report released Thursday.
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The report by the nonprofit Save the Children paints a horrifying picture of terrified children developing speech disorders and incontinence, and some even losing the capacity to speak. Others attempt self-harm and suicide. Authors of the study, the largest of its kind to be undertaken during the conflict, warned that the nation's mental health crisis had reached a tipping point, where "staggering levels" of trauma and distress among children could cause permanent and irreversible damage. "We are failing children inside Syria, some of whom are being left to cope with harrowing experiences, from witnessing their parents killed in front of them to the horrors of life under siege, without proper support," said Marcia Brophy, a mental health adviser for Save the Children in the Middle East.

[center] Children pulled by an adult after airstrikes killed nearly 30 people, mostly children, in the northern rebel-held village of Hass, Syria

Researchers spoke with 450 children, adolescents and adults in seven of Syria's 14 governorates. Adults said the main cause of psychological stress is the constant shelling and bombardment that characterize the war that is nearing its sixth anniversary. Half the children the researchers talked to said they never or rarely feel safe at school and 40 percent said they don't feel safe to play outside, even right outside their own home.

More than 70 percent of children interviewed experienced common symptoms of "toxic stress" or post-traumatic stress disorder, such as bedwetting, the study found. Loss of speech, aggression and substance abuse are also commonplace. About 48 percent of adults reported seeing children who have lost the ability to speak or who have developed speech impediments since the war began, according to the report. More than half of the adults interviewed by Save the Children said they knew of children or adolescents who were recruited into armed groups. The report called on the combatants to stop using explosives in populated areas, halt attacks on schools and hospitals, and stop recruiting children to fight.

Report: Syrian Children Suffering from 'Toxic Stress' Due to War
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China Vows Blue Skies Despite Economic Challenges
March 05, 2017 - China will work to clear its skies by increasing investment in clean energy and punishing polluters, Premier Li Keqiang said Sunday in comments aimed at mollifying public anger over chronic smog.
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Swathes of northern China were blanketed under toxic smog this winter, affecting more than 100 million people and forcing government agencies to take emergency measures to curb pollution. "Environmental pollution remains grave, and in particular, some areas are frequently hit by smog," Li told delegates to the rubber-stamp National People's Congress (NPC) in opening its annual session. But "we will make our skies blue again", he said in his annual state-of-the-nation speech. Pollution has plagued China for years, with the dramatic fouling of the country's air, water and soil representing the dark side of breakneck economic growth that has lifted hundreds of millions out of poverty.

Li listed a series of measures China will take this year to help clear the air, including upgrading coal-fired power plants to make them less polluting, reducing coal-fired heating, and implementing "round-the-clock monitoring" of industrial pollution. He said China would "basically" scrap all high-emission vehicles and pursue a three percent cut in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide -- key components of the country's toxic smog. "Faster progress in work to improve the environment, particularly air quality, is what people are desperately hoping for," Li said. China also will decrease its energy consumption per unit of GDP by 3.4 percent and reduce coal-fired power capacity.


Buildings are seen on a hazy day in Xiangyang, Hubei province, China

China has long promised to clean up its act, but the pledges have taken a back seat to ensuring rapid economic growth, which the government sees as critical for guaranteeing social stability. "Environmental issues are the most important because this affects people every day and leaves problems for the next generations," Chang Chunbun, a NPC delegate from Hong Kong, told AFP. "To solve pollution the authorities have to add power behind their laws to better enforce environmental protection policies." The ruling Communist Party is seeking to make a difficult transition away from dependence on heavily polluting industries to a more service-oriented economy fueled by consumer demand.

Last year GDP grew 6.7 percent, the slowest rate in a quarter of a century, and Li on Sunday lowered the growth target to "around 6.5 percent" for 2017. Maintaining the desired growth rates has so far meant spinning up the output of goods like steel, coal and cement, whose production is heavily polluting. But the government is increasingly having to balance its concern over an economic slowdown with fears of a public backlash over environmental pollution. In recent months, police have cracked down on protests sparked by pollution in several major cities and moved to censor complaints about bad air online.

China Vows Blue Skies Despite Economic Challenges
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Old 03-07-2017, 03:11 AM
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We have a severe pollution problem here in London. We were told that diesel was good for lessening pollution from vehicles so a lot purchased diesel. Now we are told they are bad for pollution. The popularity of Uber here has certainly increased traffic. Once we cease being members of the European Union any directives and laws that is good for us concerning pollution will be thrown out the window. Respiratory illnesses are exacerbated on high pollution days. We had one of those days a couple of weeks ago here.
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Old 03-08-2017, 05:09 AM
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Not one weather change denier present how nice... I mean the mere mention of weather or environment with my user name attached draws them like flies to a dead man.

let's wait and see.......................

I would believe that many die in these far E.Asian countries which are in either the beginning or middle of their Industrial drive to economic freedom..


In China's case it's drive started back in the late 1800's.
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Old 10-19-2017, 12:15 AM
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Garbage is going to start seeping out into waste disposal operations around the world. ..

The Chinese blockage in the global waste disposal system
Wed, 18 Oct 2017 - A ban on the import of waste in China is about create a major blockage backing up through the global waste disposal system
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Imagine the world as a global waste disposal system. Now imagine it with a blockage. And what if that waste is backing up around the world, reappearing in places where you really don't want it to be. That blockage is about to happen in China and the flood is going to start seeping out into waste disposal operations around the world. Three months ago, China decided to ban 24 different grades of rubbish as part of its "National Sword" campaign against foreign garbage. Until now China has been importing millions of tonnes of the world's waste every year to feed its recycling industry. The Bureau of International Recycling China estimates that China last year imported 7.3 million tonnes of plastic scrap from Europe, Japan and USA, and 27 million tonnes of waste paper.


In Hong Kong, 2,500 tonnes of waste paper are piling up at its docks every day

Robin Wiener, president of the US-based Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, said: "More than 155,000 direct jobs are supported by the US industry's export activities, earning an average wage of almost $76,000 and contributing more than $3bn to federal, state, and local taxes. "A ban on imports of scrap commodities into China would be catastrophic to the recycling industry." The new restrictions have yet to be agreed by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and China could still change its mind, but the waste is already starting to back up. In Hong Kong, 2,500 tonnes of waste paper are piling up at its docks every day.

Easy option

For China the problem is simply one of pollution. Its submission to the WTO reads: "We found that large amounts of dirty wastes or even hazardous wastes are mixed in the solid waste that can be used as raw materials. This polluted China's environment seriously." Western recyclers admit that China has been a cheap and easy waste bin for their industry. In theory the rubbish from your recycling rubbish bin is meant to be treated or sorted before it goes in the container overseas, but the rules have too often been ignored and rarely enforced. Mike Baxter, external affairs director at the recycler RPC Group, says: "The easiest option for years has been put it into a container and send it overseas where the labour is cheaper and it can be sorted by hand."


Western recyclers admit that China has been a cheap and easy waste bin for their industry

But with the ban expected to come into full effect by the new year, if not before, the UK industry has written urging the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to help with the expected overflow. Even so, Robin Latcham, editor of the recycling industry magazine MRW believes the recyclers are not spelling out the problems loudly enough, and says: "Why no mention of growing domestic stockpiles of waste and the danger of more fires or incidents of waste crime? "I don't think it is scare-mongering to set out such fears, along with concern that public perception of the recycling industry in its widest sense will be heavily scarred by greater fly-tipping, larger-scale dumping and more plumes of heavy black smoke crossing housing estates." No minister from Defra was available for comment, but a spokesman told the BBC: "We are aware of this situation and are looking into the potential implications."

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Old 10-20-2017, 06:45 AM
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Pollution linked to one in six deaths...

Pollution linked to one in six deaths
Thu, 19 Oct 2017 - Pollution has been linked to nine million deaths each year worldwide, according to a report in The Lancet.
Quote:
Almost all of these deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries, where pollution could account for up to a quarter of deaths. Bangladesh and Somalia were the worst affected. Air pollution had the biggest impact, accounting for two-thirds of deaths from pollution. Brunei and Sweden had the lowest numbers of pollution-related deaths. Most of these deaths were caused by non-infectious diseases linked to pollution, such as heart disease, stroke and lung cancer. "Pollution is much more than an environmental challenge - it is a profound and pervasive threat that affects many aspects of human health and wellbeing," said the study's author, Prof Philip Landrigan, of the Icahn School of Medicine, at Mount Sinai in New York.


The biggest risk factor, air pollution, contributed to 6.5 million premature deaths. This included pollution from outdoor sources, such as gases and particulate matter in the air, and in households, from burning wood or charcoal indoors. The next largest risk factor, water pollution, accounted for 1.8 million deaths, while pollution in the workplace was linked to 800,000 deaths globally. About 92% of these deaths occurred in poorer countries, with the greatest impact felt in places undergoing rapid economic development such as India, which had the fifth highest level of pollution deaths, and China, which had the 16th.

UK faring worse

In the UK, about 8% or 50,000 deaths are estimated to be linked to pollution. This puts the UK in 55th place out of the 188 countries measured, placing them behind the US and many European countries, including Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Denmark. Dr Penny Woods, of the British Lung Foundation, said: "Air pollution is reaching crisis point worldwide, and the UK is faring worse than many countries in Western Europe and the US. "A contributing factor could be our dependence on diesel vehicles, notorious for pumping out a higher amount of poisonous particles and gases. "These hit people with a lung condition, children and the elderly hardest." The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said a £3 billion plan had been put in place to improve air quality and reduce harmful emissions. A spokesman said: "We will also end the sale of new diesel and petrol cars by 2040, and next year we will publish a comprehensive Clean Air Strategy which will set out further steps to tackle air pollution."


Mike Hawes from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders said the latest diesel cars were the cleanest in history. He said the biggest change to air quality would be achieved "by encouraging the uptake of the latest, lowest emission technologies and ensuring road transport can move smoothly". In the United States, more than 5.8% - or 155,000 - deaths could be linked to pollution. The authors said air pollution affected the poor disproportionately, including those in poor countries as well as poor people in wealthy countries. Study author Karti Sandilya, from Pure Earth, a non-governmental organisation, said: "Pollution, poverty, poor health, and social injustice are deeply intertwined. "Pollution threatens fundamental human rights, such as the right to life, health, wellbeing, safe work, as well as protections of children and the most vulnerable." The results were the product of a two-year project. The authors have published an interactive map illustrating their data.

Pollution linked to one in six deaths - BBC News
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Old 10-21-2017, 07:12 PM
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I was reading earlier today where Scence s say screw it.[/U]ing that PollU]tion cost $4.6 billion[/U] and kills 9+ million a year.

More that all wars natural distastereds combined.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=Study+...ZI&form=MOZSBR
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