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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss African drought at the General Discussion; Drought a natural disaster in Kenya... Kenya declares drought a national disaster, seeks help 10 Feb 2017: Kenya declared a ...

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Old 02-10-2017, 11:11 PM
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Exclamation African drought

Drought a natural disaster in Kenya...

Kenya declares drought a national disaster, seeks help
10 Feb 2017: Kenya declared a national disaster on Friday, calling for aid to counter drought that is posing a major risk to people, livestock and wildlife.
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The Kenya Red Cross has estimated around 2.7 million people are in need of food aid after low rainfall in October and November and the next rainy season not due before April.

President Uhuru Kenyatta called for "local and international partners to come in and support the government’s efforts to contain the situation," a statement from his office said. The U.N. World Food Programme said it was short of US$22 million (18 million pounds) for the next six to nine months to provide support such as school meals for 428,000 children who often depend on them as their only substantial meal of the day.


A Kenyan soldier looks at a cow which is dying from hunger, a few hundred meters from the official boundary of the Kenya-Ethiopia border in northwestern Kenya

The presidency did not set out how much the government needed for the drought, but said it had released 7.3 billion shillings (US$70 million) and local authorities had provided another 2 billion. Out of Kenya's 47 counties, 23 have been deemed to be facing disastrous drought. "The government intends to enhance the interventions including doubling of food rations and cash transfers among other measures," the presidency statement said.

Early this month, residents in drought-struck northern Kenya said at least 11 people were killed and a tourist lodge torched due to conflicts when armed cattle herders flooded onto farms and wildlife reserves. (US$1 = 103.4500 Kenyan shillings)

Kenya declares drought a national disaster, seeks help - Channel NewsAsia
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Old 02-11-2017, 01:42 AM
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Default Re: African drought

om goodness. prayers for this region and its people
I will share the story. hopefully help will be on the way.
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Old 03-10-2017, 04:36 PM
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Keepin' watch on droughts could Aid Vulnerable Areas...

Monitoring Droughts' Movements Would Aid Vulnerable Areas, Researchers Say
March 09, 2017 — It's a major natural disaster that slowly grows in one place and then moves across a region, gaining intensity and size. As it spreads, it destroys land, ruins agriculture and tears apart communities, and it can kill people. It's a drought.
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Researchers are just beginning to view droughts as this type of dynamic force, and some hope that soon they will be monitored similarly to hurricanes — with scientists able to predict their development, helping to protect those living in their path. Ten percent of droughts travel between 1,400 to 3,100 kilometers from where they begin, according to a recent study. The study, which analyzed 1,420 droughts between 1979 and 2009, identified "hot spots" around the world and common directions in which droughts move.


Farmer Sindulfo Fernandez inspects a dried watering hole for llamas in Orinoca, Oruro Department, Bolivia, Jan. 8, 2016. The water dried due to a drought.

Some droughts in the southwest United States, for example, tend to move from south to north. In Argentina, they usually migrate the opposite direction. In Central Africa, droughts tend to go southeastern toward the coast. "It can start somewhere, move throughout the continent, and obviously cause harm throughout its way," Julio Herrera-Estrada, a doctoral candidate at Princeton University and leader of the study, said Thursday. Droughts that travel are usually the largest and most disastrous, the scientists found. They can cause a loss of agriculture, wildlife, wetlands and human life, according to the National Drought Mitigation Center in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Very costly

They are also one of the most expensive natural disasters that people face today, according to Herrera-Estrada, who collaborated on the study with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. The most recent moving drought that Herrera-Estrada studied began in 2008 in Ukraine and Russia, and moved 1,700 kilometers northeast, ending in northwest Russia and affecting parts of Kazakhstan on the way. It lasted almost a year. "People haven't really thought of droughts in this way," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Future research, Herrera-Estrada said, can shed light on what mechanisms cause some droughts to move and what affects their paths. This can be done accurately, however, only through collaboration among national governments, he said. "It's important to have a global or a continental understanding about how droughts are behaving," he said. Collaboration "benefits people on the ground, farmers, cities that need water, power plants that need water." The study was published last week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Monitoring Droughts' Movements Would Aid Vulnerable Areas, Researchers Say
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Old Yesterday, 04:52 PM
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Drought of epic proportions in Somaliland...

Official Says 80 Percent of Livestock Dead in Somaliland
March 24, 2017 — Authorities in the breakaway republic of Somaliland say at least 80 percent of the region's livestock have died due to the crippling drought that has also killed dozens of people and forced thousands into displaced persons camps.
Quote:
“The situation is very grave as most of the livestock were killed by drought,” said Mohamud Ali Saleban, governor of the Togdheer region, in the town of Buro. “We are waiting for the rain, but if it does not come in the next few days, we expect the government to declare an emergency,” the governor told VOA. Officials told VOA that nearly 50 people across Somaliland have died due to drought-related illnesses. Nomadic communities all across this region said they have never experienced this kind of drought. Jama Handulle Yassin, a 63-year-old herder, said he has lost more than 280 goats, leaving him with just 30. “The starvation affected everything, and the situation now is very dangerous where we run for our lives before we die here," he said. "We appeal to the world to immediately support us.”


The carcass of a dead animal lies in the middle of a street in the Sool region of Somaliland.

Another woman, age 73, said, “This is the worst I have seen in my life.” Somaliland was affected by the 2011 regional drought that killed an estimated 260,000 people, but that event had its gravest impact in south and central Somalia. Somaliland declared independence from Somalia in 1991 but is not recognized by any other country. The current drought has forced tens of thousands of pastoralists to flee from remote villages into towns, where they set up makeshift camps. As water becomes scarce, the drought is forcing many people living in camps outside the town of Las-Anod to drink dirty water.


Standing near the carcass of a camel, Roble Jama, a 13-year-old herder, said his family lost the only camel they had due to drought. “I have seen when the camel was dying and I felt so sad. The camel’s name was Cadaawe and was nine years old,” Roble Jama told VOA near the village of Ina-Afmadobe. The people affected by drought said they have received little or no help from the Somaliland government or aid agencies. The United Nations recently warned that 6.2 million people across Somalia are facing acute food shortages. More than 1.5 million of those live in Somaliland.

Official Says 80 Percent of Livestock Dead in Somaliland
See also:

Official: At Least 25 Starve to Death in Somaliland
March 22, 2017 - At least 25 people have died of starvation in the self-declared republic of Somaliland as the Horn of Africa grapples with an increasingly severe drought.
Quote:
“The drought situation is at its most dangerous level. Eighty percent of the livestock have gone and we are struggling with saving people, who have started dying. So far, we have recorded 25 deaths, most of them children who starved to death," said Ahmed Abdi Salay, the governor of Somaliland's northwest Sanag region. According to the United Nations, more than 50,000 children across Somaliland and Somalia are facing possible death because of the ongoing regional drought. Somaliland declared independence from Somalia in 1991 but is not recognized by any other country. The news about the deaths in Sanag emerged a day after government-owned Radio Mogadishu website reported that at least 26 people died of starvation in Somalia's southern region of Jubaland.


Children drink water delivered by a truck in the drought stricken Baligubadle village near Hargeisa, the capital city of Somaliland, in this handout picture provided by The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

The governor of the Togdheer region in Somaliland, Mohamud Ali Saleban, said the drought is affecting every part of Somali society. “The pain of the drought has touched us in all levels, every office and every household there is the impact," he said. "Relatives who lost their livestock have resorted to come to the cities in search of lifesaving assistance from their acquaintances and relatives,” Saleban said. On Monday, Somali Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khaire included a minister of disaster management in his Cabinet, saying the ministry will deal with the drought that has left more than 6 million Somalis in need of aid.

Governor Salay said more than 15,000 people who have fled rural areas are now living in makeshift displaced persons' camps in the Sanag region capital of Erigavo. According to a statement from the Somali doctors’ association, a group of Mogadishu doctors has joined the Drought Relief Campaign, providing medical services to individuals in the camps for the internally displaced.

http://www.voanews.com/a/somalia-som...r/3777227.html
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Last edited by waltky; Yesterday at 05:02 PM..
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