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Climate Change & The Environment Discuss Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas at the General Discussion; Well I guess they mean in the USA.. Yet there are plenty of areas which will be flooded first, before ...

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Old 08-13-2013, 12:36 PM
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Default Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Well I guess they mean in the USA.. Yet there are plenty of areas which will be flooded first, before some of our cities...

Then we can just say this won't happen And buy a big boat just in case..

Quote:
.Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich | 24/7 Wall St. – Mon, Aug 12, 2013 10:52 AM EDT.

If climate change goes unchecked, sea levels in the United States could rise as much as 23 feet, affecting 18 million people in hundreds of cities along the nation’s coasts. According to the nonprofit climate research group Climate Central, there is a real chance that some of the largest urban areas could be almost entirely submerged by the rising ocean levels caused by global warming.

Climate Central’s report estimated rising sea levels for thousands of municipalities around the country. In New Orleans, it found that there is at least a 50% chance that water levels will rise five feet by 2030, submerging 90% of the area’s homes and displacing more than 300,000 residents. Based on Climate Central’s data, these are the seven cities at risk of rising seas.

The Most Dangerous Cities in America
.................................................. ................. SKIPPED SOME ...............
America's Worst Companies to Work For

In addition, large residential or commercial areas in these cities are five feet or less above sea level. St. Petersburg, Fla., for example, is located on the Tampa Bay peninsula in the Gulf Coast. Its highest point is only 61 feet above sea level. In Metairie, La., the highest point is less than 20 feet above sea level.

Several of these at-risk areas have neighborhoods located so close to -- or even below -- sea level that they are protected by flood levees, which can fail in poor conditions. These risks were made apparent in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Stockton, Calif., located in the San Joaquin Valley, is also protected by levees.

The decade when these cities are most at risk varies widely. New Orleans and Metairie in Louisiana could see dramatic effects -- with well more than half the residents being displaced -- in the next few decades. For other areas -- St. Petersburg and Hollywood in Florida or Stockton and Huntington Beach in California -- extreme flooding isn’t a real possibility until closer to the end of the century.

The Most Oil-Rich States

In order to identify the cities that are at risk, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed sea level rise estimates provided by Climate Central for the 200 largest cities in the country by population.
............................................... SKIPPED SOME MORE ................

These are seven cities at risk of rising seas.


1. Metairie, La.
> Population at risk: 138,399 (est. 2040)
> Homes at risk: 65,649 (est. 2040)
> Pct. land area at risk: 100% (est. 2040)

According to recent measurements and climate projections,

............................................ CONTINUED AT:
Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas - Yahoo! Finance
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:23 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

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Originally Posted by mlurp View Post
Well I guess they mean in the USA.. Yet there are plenty of areas which will be flooded first, before some of our cities...

Then we can just say this won't happen And buy a big boat just in case..


Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas - Yahoo! Finance
If we are lucky, it will rise enough to engulf New York City and Los Angeles. You'd see the libs running like rats deserting a sinking ship.
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:48 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

If any of them go underwater, I can't wait to dive them.
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Old 10-30-2017, 04:44 AM
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Exclamation Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Climate change threatening defense installations...

In Trump Era, Rising Seas Still a Concern for Defense Department
29 Oct 2017 | Military leaders will continue to address the risks that climate change poses to bases and national security.
Quote:
Climate scientists in the federal government have been on the defensive since President Donald Trump took office in January. But military leaders will continue to address the risks that climate change poses to bases and national security, a senior Pentagon official said at conference Friday on sea level rise. Maureen Sullivan, a Defense Department deputy assistant secretary who oversees environmental issues, indicated that Defense Secretary James Mattis has set that tone from day one of the Trump administration. The Senate confirmed Mattis by 98-1 on the day Trump was inaugurated. Though it was apparent Mattis would breeze through, his senior aides still combed the written answers that Pentagon officials helped craft in response to senators' written questions.

Sullivan said they didn't like the "wishy-washy" words on climate change that her staffers submitted. "They came back to us and said: 'These are too weak. Secretary Mattis believes in climate change and the risk to national security. You need to make those stronger.' " Within the government, Sullivan said, "a changing climate" is replacing "climate change" as the term de rigueur. No matter what it's called, she said: "The fundamentals stay the same. The same general policy is that this is a risk that we need to integrate in day-to-day decision-making." Friday's conference, which drew more than 200 attendees, was called "Defending our Coasts: Ensuring Military Readiness & Economic Viability As Waters Rise." It was sponsored by the William & Mary Law School's Virginia Coastal Policy Center.


Families greet their loved ones returning home to Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va. According the the Union of Concerned Scientists, the base and its Dam Neck Annex will be underwater by 2100.

It didn't take long for presenters to make the case for why climate change and sea level rise threaten military readiness. Shana Udvardy, a climate preparedness specialist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, ticked through the highlights of some of her group's recent reports on the threats to coastal bases. If global sea levels rise by 3.7 feet this century, as the union has forecast, more than half of Naval Air Station Oceana and its Dam Neck Annex will be underwater every day in 2100. The base stands to lose more than 10 percent of its land mass to constant flooding in just the next 35 years, according to the group. Joint Base Langley-Eustis would suffer large land losses as well, the group says. Storm surges from hurricanes would wreak even more havoc in the era of higher sea levels, potentially swamping entire bases, including Naval Station Norfolk, Udvardy said.

Some conference speakers decried Trump's move to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord, saying the international agreement to reduce carbon emissions offers the clearest road map for slowing the global warming that's causing ice to melt and seas to rise. Udvardy said she found some encouragement in a vote by the Republican-controlled House in June. It approved an amendment to a military spending bill that requires the defense secretary to address climate change in numerous ways, including by compiling a list of the most vulnerable installations and proposing strategies for protecting them. The amendment still must be accepted by House and Senate conferees before it becomes part of a final bill.

https://www.military.com/daily-news/...epartment.html
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Old 11-08-2017, 10:47 AM
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Cool Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Dat's why Granny don't go to Hawaii - she don't want rising seas or cannibals to get her...

Island Nations Fear 'Apocalyptic' Storms Will Overwhelm Them
November 07, 2017 — Unless emissions can be drastically and quickly curbed, efforts by small island nations to adapt to climate change may be in vain, a leader of a group of small island nations said Tuesday.
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Hurricanes that hit the Caribbean this year were like nothing seen before, with Hurricane Irma so strong it was picked up by seismic machines that detect earthquake tremors, officials said. National plans to curb planet-warming emissions, drawn up ahead of the Paris Agreement, currently add up to a projected temperature rise of 3 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2100 — well above the 1 degree Celsius rise already seen. That may bring climate impacts that are impossible for small island nations to deal with, their leaders warned Tuesday at the U.N. climate talks in Bonn.


Sanjogeeta Kiran, right, with her sister Sulva Kiran, second left, and her children Shivendera, left, and Raajeen, sit amid the debris of their home in RakiRaki, Fiji, Feb. 24, 2016, after Cyclone Winston ripped through the island nation.

If ambition to curb climate remains modest, "have we created a situation for small island developing states where resilience may not necessarily be ... achievable?" asked Janine Felson, Belize ambassador to the United Nations and vice chair of the Alliance of Small Island States. This year, Hurricane Maria destroyed broad swaths of homes and infrastructure on the Caribbean island of Dominica and stripped its trees bare. Barbuda island was left temporarily uninhabitable when Irma whipped through the region. "In the Caribbean we're used to hurricanes, but ... for the first time we've seen storms turbocharge and supersize in a matter of hours," she said, speaking on the sidelines of the climate talks.


A traditionally dressed Fijian warrior with a weapon poses for a picture in front of a Fijian double-hulled sailing canoe during the COP23 U.N. Climate Change Conference 2017, hosted by Fiji but held in Bonn, at World Conference Center Bonn, Germany

The storms' impact was "quite apocalyptic," and magnified the acute vulnerability of small island states, Felson said. Even so, countries — who are now clear on the risks — can take steps to protect themselves by building structures better able to weather storms, and ensuring policies take into account the rapidly changing climate, she said. "If we do not know the extent of our vulnerability, then we will not change," Felson said.

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Old 11-08-2017, 03:59 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Hurricanes that hit the Caribbean this year were like nothing seen before, with Hurricane Irma so strong it was picked up by seismic machines that detect earthquake tremors, officials said............... I quote from the article.

What do you see that is wrong with the statement that critical thinking will easily reveal?

"Unlike nothing seen before". Lets start with that part. Pretty fuqing obtuse of a statement. According to who? Compared to what?

As for the seismic readings, how many other hurricanes had those? How far away were the readings taken? I would want to see some data, and talk to an expert on seismic readings before I would ever take what is being said as the "truth" of the matter...

And with out this lead and misleading statement at the preface of the article, the rest is rather meaningless, or pointless as the case may be...

I want more definite proof. I know an IPPC official who says this malarkey is just about wealth redistribution through taxation, and carbon credits bull sh1t. So between the above questions about the opening statement, and the fact of and IPPC official statements I say bullsh1t to the article.

Regards, Kirk
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Old 11-08-2017, 04:31 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Kinda like any hard liner Denier with this crap Kirk.. Look Trump is having a C.C. awaking. So catch up...

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Originally Posted by 300 H and H View Post
Hurricanes that hit the Caribbean this year were like nothing seen before, with Hurricane Irma so strong it was picked up by seismic machines that detect earthquake tremors, officials said............... I quote from the article.

So far so good, but from here it is all down hill.

What do you see that is wrong with the statement that critical thinking will easily reveal?

Nothing

"Unlike nothing seen before". Lets start with that part. Pretty fuqing obtuse of a statement. According to who? Compared to what?

As for the seismic readings
, how many other hurricanes had those? How far away were the readings taken? I would want to see some data, and talk to an expert on seismic readings before I would ever take what is being said as the "truth" of the matter...

Why not get off your ash bottom and goggle this and find out yourself.


And with out this lead and misleading statement at the preface of the article, the rest is rather meaningless, or pointless as the case may be...

I want more definite proof. I know an IPPC official who says this malarkey is just about wealth redistribution through taxation, and carbon credits bull sh1t. So between the above questions about the opening statement, and the fact of and IPPC official statements I say bullsh1t to the article.

Regards, Kirk
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Old 11-08-2017, 06:33 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

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Originally Posted by mlurp View Post
Kinda like any hard liner Denier with this crap Kirk.. Look Trump is having a C.C. awaking. So catch up...
NO you listen up.

Comment on my post or shut the F up.

You idiots believe anything your foolish minds believe with out question. Time to talk about it, and time for me to bury your foolish ideas.

Regards, Kirk
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Old 11-09-2017, 01:38 PM
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Default Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Quote:
Originally Posted by 300 H and H View Post
NO you listen up.

Comment on my post or shut the F up.

You idiots believe anything your foolish minds believe with out question. Time to talk about it, and time for me to bury your foolish ideas.

Regards, Kirk


DIPSTICK.............. Who made you king azzwipe? Plus I did comment clown... You post crap in this area"C.C."

Why doesn't that lap dog of yours, Infidel post his own thoughts.......
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:46 AM
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Exclamation Re: Seven Cities at Risk of Rising Seas

Miami Faces Future of Rising Seas...

Miami Faces Future of Rising Seas
November 21, 2017 — Sue Brogan's street is barely above sea level on a good day. During autumn's "king tides," when the sun and moon align to create the highest tides of the year, Biscayne Bay backs up through storm drains and flows into Brogan's street, in Miami's low-lying Shorecrest neighborhood.
Quote:
Roads flood. The salt water rusts cars and kills greenery. For now, it's mostly a nuisance several days a year. But Brogan knows it's only going to get worse. "It's more of a warning situation. Where is it going to go from this?" she asks. Climate change is expected to raise sea levels a minimum of three-quarters of a meter by the end of the century, according to the estimates that regional planners use. That puts most of Shorecrest underwater year-round, along with other low-lying waterfront neighborhoods. And higher seas mean increased risk of tidal flooding and storm surges across this hurricane-prone city.


Flood waters rise around signs at the Haulover Marine Center at Haulover Park as Hurricane Irma passes by, Sept. 10, 2017, in North Miami Beach, Florida.

The planners' high-end estimate is two meters of sea level rise. That would submerge most of the glitzy city of Miami Beach, across the bay. And scientists say three to three-and-a-half meters is extreme but plausible. In that scenario, Miami Beach is gone and Miami is an archipelago. Planning for this future is difficult, expensive and often controversial. But the Miami region has little choice. "Sea level rise is an existential threat," said City of Miami Chief Resilience Officer Jane Gilbert. "But it is not an imminent existential threat ... We have time to plan."

Miami Beach leads way

As a barrier island with some of the most expensive real estate in the region, Miami Beach is quite literally on the front lines of climate change. The city has the motivation, and the resources, to take some of the most aggressive action in the region. Residents are paying for roughly half a billion dollars' worth of seawalls, raised streets, sewer pumps and more. "Thankfully, our residents — the folks that are footing the bill for this work — realize that the cost of doing nothing is much greater," said Public Works Director Eric Carpenter.


Tidal flooding in Highland Village, North Miami Beach.

There have been some hiccups. Raising roads put adjacent properties below street level. At least one flood-damage insurance claim has been denied as a result, and residents and businesses are worried there will be more. Miami Beach is working to resolve the dispute. "I think there are inherent risks with being first," Carpenter said. But the city gets credit for moving forward despite the challenges. "It's not working perfectly. But they're at least doing the experimentation," said Zelalem Adefris with the advocacy group Catalyst Miami.

Redesigning Shorecrest
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